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DUKE 
UNIVERSITY 




LIBRARY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2012 with funding from 
Duke University Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/dukeuniversityca1979duke 



Duke University 

CALENDAR! 




September 2-9, 1979 



olume 79 



Published August 31, 1979 



Number 1 



Sunday, September 2 

Sept. 2-Oct. 1 D. U. U. Galleries Committee: CHRIS SIZEMORE, 
Paintings. W. Campus Gallery (Bet. Flowers Lounge and 
Page Aud.). 

9:30 & 11:30 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Gray Bldg., Di- 
vinity School). 

11:00 a.m. Duke Hillel Brunch for Jewish freshmen/transfers. E. 
Campus Ctr. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Robert T. Young, Minister to the Univer- 
sity. The Service of Worship is broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 
FM. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "THE BUDDY HOLLY 
STORY." Gary Busey in musical biography of Rock 'n Roll 
pioneer. Buddy Holly. Page Aud. $1.50. 

8:00-10:00 p.m. Baptist Stu. Union Coffee House. (Location 
TBA.) 

8:00 & 10:00 p.m. Duke Players Freshman Week Show: "THE 
PUBLIC EYE." Branson Theatre. Free. 

Monday, September 3 
LABOR DAY 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

2:00-4:00 p.m. Chapel Choir and Choral Auditions. 303 W. Union. 

7:30 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Freshman Week Film: "MIDNIGHT 

COWBOY." Jon Voight, Dustin Hoffman. Big City hustler 

befriends crippled con artist. Academy Awards, Inc. "Best 

Picture." Bio. Sci. Aud. Free. 

Tuesday, September 4 

Sept. 4-Oct. 9 D. U. U. Galleries Committee: SARAH VINCENT, 
Weavings. E. Campus Library. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

9:00 a.m. FALL SEMESTER CLASSES BEGIN. 
10:00 A.M.-Noon: 2:00-4:00 p.m. Chapel Choir and Chorale Audi- 
tions. 303 W. Union. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 

3:00-6:00 p.m. D. U. U. Crafts Center registration for Fall 
classes. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Botany Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. John D. 
Tenhunen. Bio. Sci. Bldg. Aud., Rm. III. 

7:30 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "THE DOVE." Death plays 
badminton in this spoof on Bergman. "THE SEVENTH 
SEAL." Max von Sydow as knight who plays game of chess 
with Death while Plague ravages Europe. Bio. Sci. Aud. 
Free, D. U. undergrads with I. D. $1.50, All others. 

Wednesday, September 5 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 

10:00 a.m. -Noon: 2:00-4:00 p.m. Chapel Choir and Chorale Audi- 
tions. 303 W. Union. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
7:00 p.m. Meeting of D. U. Drama Majors. Branson Theatre. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Players Annual Fall Open House. Branson 
Theatre. Open to University community. Refreshments. 
Tours of theatre facility. 



Thursday, September 6 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 

7:30 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film: "MR. SMITH GOES TO 
WASHINGTON." James Stewart. Jean Arthur, and Claude 
Rains star in this Frank Capra-directed drama about idealis- 
tic, naive young man elected U. S. senator by corrupt polit- 
ical machine. Bio. Sci. Aud. Free, D. U. undergrads with 
I. D. $1.50, All others. 

Friday, September 7 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Botany Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Norm L. Chris- 

tensen. Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
1:00 p.m. Duke Islamic Assoc. Prayers. Rm. 226 Perkins Library. 
7:30, 9:00 p.m. & Midnight. Freewater Film: "MIDNIGHT EX- 
PRESS." Harrowing tale of young American incarcerated in 
foreign prison on drug charge. Bio. Sci. Aud. Free, D. U. 
undergrads with I. D. $1.50, All others. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "THE PUBLIC EYE." Branson Theatre. 
$2.50 All Seats. 



Saturday, September 8 

10:00 a.m. D. U. Botany Dept. Greenhouses Plant Sale begins. The 
Ark (E. Campus). 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

10:30 a.m. Freewater Children's Films: "BEAST OF MONSIEUR 
RACINE": "ZLATEH THE GOAT": "THE RED BAL- 
LOON"; "PAWN SHOP." Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. Free 
(this showing only). 
5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Gray Bldg.. Divinity 

School). 
7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "CHINA SYNDROME." 
Tension-filled thriller about politics involved when nuclear 
reactor threatens disaster. Jane Fonda, Michael Douglas, 
Jack Lemon. Page Aud. $1.50. 
8: 15 p.m. Duke Players: "THE PUBLIC EYE." Branson Theatre. 
$2.50 All seats. 



Sunday, September 9 

9:30 & 11:30 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. Wm. Sloane Coffin, Sr. Minister, 
Riverside Church, N.Y.C. 
11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room. E. Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults $3.50; children under 12, x /i price. Wine service avail- 
able. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "CHINA SYNDROME." 
Page Aud. $1.50. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of September 9th- 16th 
is Friday, August 31st, before 3:00 p.m., as the 
usual Monday deadline falls on Labor Day, Sep- 
tember 3rd, a University holiday. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



DUKE PLAYERS OPEN FIFTIETH SEASON 

The Duke University Players will open their fiftieth 
anniversary season with four free performances to be 
given for the University community on Saturday and 
Sunday, September 1st and 2nd at 8:00 and 10:00 p.m. 
in Branson Theatre. No tickets are necessary for these 
performances. Two additional performances of The 
Public Eye will be held on Friday and Saturday, Sep- 
tember 7th and 8th, at 8:15 p.m. in Branson Theatre. 
All seats for this performance are $2.50 and are now on 
sale at Page Box Office. 

The Public Eye is a one-act comedy by Peter Shaf- 
fer, author of Equus, The Royal Hunt of the Sun, 
Black Comedy and White Liars and Five Finger Exer- 
cise. The play is about an accountant who suspects his 
wife of infidelity and hires a private investigator to 
confirm his suspicions. 

The additional season plays are: Shakespeare's As 
You Like It (October 18th-21st and 25th-28th); The 
Beeple, a children's theatre production by Alan Cullen 
(November 30th-December 2nd and December 7th- 
9th); Ring Round the Moon, a French comedy by Jean 
Anouilh (translated by Christopher Fry) (February 
21st-24th and February 28th-March 2nd); and Toys in 
the Attic by William Hellman (April 17th-20th and 
April 24th-27th). (Information about the various sub- 
scription plans is available from Duke Players, 684- 
3181 or in the Duke Players brochure.) 



ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Botany will sponsor a special 
ecology seminar on Tuesday, September 4th, at 4:00 
p.m. in the Biological Sciences Building Auditorium 
Room 111. Dr. John D. Tenhunen, Division of Biologi- 
cal Sciences, University of Michigan, will speak on 
'Simulation of Gas Exchange of Apricot Leaves under 
Field Conditions." Dr. Tenhunen is presently working 
in Wurzburg, West Germany, with Dr. Otto Lange. 
The work to be discussed is an extension of the series 
of papers entitled "Development of a Photosynthesis 
Model with an Emphasis on Ecological Application," 
which is being published in Oecologia. 

D.U.U. CRAFTS CENTER FALL CLASSES 

The Duke University Crafts Center maintains an ex- 
cellent faculty of professional artists and craftspeople, 
offering the following courses: 

POTTERY I 

Monday: Sept. 24-Nov. 12 7-10 p.m. 

POTTERY I 

Wednesday: Sept. 26-Nov. 14 7-10 p.m. 

POTTERY II 

Tuesday: Sept. 25-Nov. 13 7-10 p.m. 

SILKSCREEN ON FABRIC 

Tuesday: Sept. 25-Nov. 27 2-5 p.m. 

JEWELRY I 

Monday: Oct. 1-Nov. 26 7-10 p.m. 

JEWELRY II 

Wednesday: Oct. 3-Nov. 28 7-10 p.m. 

WEAVING 

Thursday: Sept. 27-Nov. 15 7-10 p.m. 

PHOTOGRAPHY I 

Tuesday: Sept. 25-Nov. 13 6-8 p.m. 

PHOTOGRAPHY I 

Tuesday: Sept. 25-Nov. 13 8:30-10:30 p.m. 

PHOTOGRAPHY II 

Thursday: Sept. 27-Nov. 15 6-8 p.m. 

PHOTOGRAPHY III 

Thursday: Sept. 27-Nov. 15 8:30-10:30 p.m. 

PAPERMAKING 

Tuesday: Sept. 25-Nov. 13 7-10 p.m. 

QUILTING 

Thursday: Sept. 27-Nov. 15 7-9:30 p.m. 

KODALITH WORKSHOP 

Saturday: Oct. 13 1-5 p.m. 

SOLARIZATION WORKSHOP 

Saturday: Oct. 27 1-5 p.m. 

PHOTOGRAMS WORKSHOP 

Saturday: Nov. 10 1-5 p.m. 

Registration for classes will be from 3:00-6:00 p.m., 
Monday-Friday, beginning September 4th. The regis- 
tration deadline for each course will be 48 hours prior 
to the first class. Cancellations must be received 48 
hours before class time to receive a refund. Classes 
lacking sufficient enrollment may be cancelled. Regis- 
trations will be taken on a first-come, first-served basis 
at the Craft Center, located in the northeast wing of 
Southgate dorm (East Campus). For more informa- 
tion, call 684-6213 between 3:00-6:00 p.m. 

DUKE PLAYERS OPEN HOUSE 
AND DRAMA MAJORS MEETING 

There will be a meeting for all Drama majors and 
prospective majors in Branson Theatre on Wednes- 
day, September 5th, at 7:00 p.m. Dr. John Clum, Di- 



rector of the Drama Program, will discuss require- 
ments for the major and course offerings for the com- 
ing year, introduce the Drama Program staff, and an- 
swer questions. At 7:30 p.m., also in Branson Theatre, 
the Duke Players will hold their Annual Open House. 
This event is open to the University community and 
the general public. Refreshments will be served, and 
tours of the theatre facility will be given to acquaint 
newcomers with Duke Players. The upcoming season 
will be discussed, and everyone interested in Duke 
Players is urged to attend. 

D. U. INSTITUTE FOR 
LEARNING IN RETIREMENT 

The Duke University Institute for Learning in Re- 
tirement will sponsor a Wine and Cheese Party on 
Thursday, September 6th, at 4:00 p.m. at the Campus 
Center, East Campus. This is an opportunity to be- 
come familiar with the courses to be offered by the 
Institute this Fall and to become acquainted with the 
program in general. Persons interested in attending the 
Wine and Cheese Party are asked to call 684-6259. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY SEMINAR 

The Department of Botany will sponsor a seminar 
on Friday, September 7th, 12:30 p.m., in Room 144 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Norm L. Christen- 
sen. Associate Professor of Botany, Duke University, 
will speak on "History of the Piedmont from Time 
Immemorial to Human Habitation: Influence on 
Present-Day Vegetation." 

D. U. GREENHOUSES PLANT SALE 

The Duke University Botany Department 
Greenhouses will sponsor a plant sale on Saturday, 
September 8th, beginning at 10:00 a.m. at The Ark, 
East Campus. (The Ark is the large white building next 
to the post office, located behind Wilson House and 
the Duke University Museum of Art. Cars should 
enter the campus at the entrance at Buchanan 
Boulevard and Trinity Avenue. Parking is available on 
adjacent side streets and in parking lots near The Ark.) 
Material for this sale will include many assorted tropi- 
cal foliage plants, succulents, stapeliads, orchids, 
bromeliads, palms, cacti, flowering plants, and hang- 
ing baskets. Both large and small plants will be avail- 
able, as will some rare plants not found in commercial 
outlets. All receipts from the sale will be applied to the 
purchase of needed greenhouse supplies and towards 
the beautification and modernization of the facility. 

SEASON TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE 

Season (or series) tickets, which represent a sub- 
stantial savings over the price of single ticket admis- 
sion prices, are now available for the following events: 

DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 

Performances at 8:15 p.m.. Page Auditorium 
Series Tickets: $33; $28: $23 



Oct. 19 MURRAY PERAHIA, Pianist 

Nov. 4 NICOLAI GEDDA. Metropolitan Opera Tenor 

Jan. 15 JEAN-PIERRE RAMPAL, Flutist 

Jan. 29 VIENNA CHAMBER ORCHESTRA with 

PHILIPPE ENTREMONT 
Feb. 2 LES GRANDS BALLETS CANADIENS: 

ROMEO & JULIET 
Mar. 19 SALVATORE ACCARDO. Violinist 

BROADWAY AT DUKE 

Performances at 8:30 p.m.. Page Auditorium 

Season Tickets: $37.50; $33; $28.50 



Oct. 4 


ESTELLE PARSONS IN MISS 




MARGARIDAS WAY 


Oct. 24 


CHICAGO 


Nov. 16 


JULIE HARRIS in THE BELLE OF 




AMHERST 


Jan. 18 


MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING. 




The National Shakespeare Company 


Feb. 8 


P. S. YOUR CAT IS DEAD 


Mar. 23 


AIN'T M1SBEHAYIS 




*DUKE PLAYERS 




Performances in Branson Theatre 


Sept. 7 & 8 


THE PUBLIC EYE 


Oct. 18-21; 




Oct. 25-28 


AS YOU LIKE IT 


Nov. 30-Dec. 2 




Dec. 7-9 


THE BEEPLE, OR JOHN WILL Y A: 




THE BEE PEOPLE 


Feb. 21-24; 




Feb. 28-Mar. 


2 RING ROUND THE MOON 


Apr. 17-20; 




Apr. 24-27 


TOYS IN THE ATTIC 



'Because of the various performance times, seating arrange- 
ments, and Season Ticket Plans ($12.50, $10.50, $9.50, $7.50), it is 
suggested that playgoers review the Duke Players brochure, avail- 
able from Duke Players, P. O. Box 6936, College Station, Durham, 
NC 27708; 684-3181. 

NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Performances at 8:00 p.m.. Page Auditorium 

Season Membership: 

$15 Gen. Public 

1 7.50 D. U. Student with I. D. 

$ 9 Other Students/65 + 
Sept. 27 JAIME LAREDO. Violinist 
Nov. 7 MISHA DICHTER. Pianist 

Feb. 11 GUHER and SUHER PEKINEL. Duo-pianists 

Apr. 21 MICHELE DJOKIC, Cellinist 

CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 

Performances at 8:15 p.m.. East Duke Building Music Room 

(unless otherwise announced) 

Season Membership: $25 

Tickets available: P. O. Box 6065. CoUege Station, Durham, NC 
27708: tel. 684-3836. 

Oct. 20 MURRAY PERAHIA and the CIOMPI QUARTET 

Nov. 17 CLEVELAND QUARTET 

Jan. 26 FRESK QUARTET (Stockholm) 

Feb. 23 JUILLIARD QUARTET 

Apr. 5 BEVERIDGE and MICHAEL WEBSTER, 

Clarinet and Piano 

N. C. CHAMBER PLAYERS 

Performances at 8:15 p.m.. East Duke Building Music Room 

Season Tickets: $8 

Sept. 29 Nov. 27 Jan. 27 

TRIANGLE DANCE GUILD 
Performances at 8:00 p.m., Page Auditorium 
Season Tickets: $12 Gen. Public 
$9 Students/65 + 



Oct. 22-26 ALVIN AILEY REPERTORY ENSEMBLE 
Feb. 4-23 WASHINGTON BALLET COMPANY 
Mar. 24-29 PAULINE KONER CONSORT 

(Please see "Page Box Office Information," this Calendar, for 
specific ticket ordering information for events other than those 
sponsored by the Chamber Arts Society.) 

N. C. CHAMBER PLAYERS 

The North Carolina Chamber Players announce 
their seventh Duke/Durham season, beginning Sep- 
tember 29th. After performing on national television, 
in pops concerts, opera performances, and their own 
chamber concerts for Artsfare '79, the Chamber 
Players will present three Duke/Durham series con- 
certs in the Music Room of the East Duke Building at 
8:15 p.m. and two special cooperative concerts. 

On Saturday, September 29th, the N. C. Chamber 
Players Gala Opening Performance will feature the 
music of Mozart, including his Piano Quintet. String 
Duo, and String Quintet. On Saturday, November 
27th, the music of the 20th Century will be featured 
with Dohnanyi's Serenade and Messien's Quartet for 
the End of Time. This series will conclude on Satur- 
day, January 27th, with Mozart's Horn Quintet, Pro- 
kofiev's Sonata for Two Violins, and Dvorak's 
"American" Quartet. 

The first special, cooperative concert is the annual 
benefit performance with the Durham Civic Choral 
Society on Sunday, October 28th, at 4:00 p.m. in 
Baldwin Auditorium (Duke University East Campus), 
featuring Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 3; 
Schubert's Mass in G Major, and the Bach Mag- 
nificat, conducted by Robert Porco and with John 
Ruggero, piano soloist. On Monday. December 10th, 
at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium, the Chamber Players 
will perform with the National Opera Company's pro- 
duction of Puccini's La Boheme, conducted by Don 
Wilder of the National Opera Company. Tickets for 
the benefit performance are $6.00 and for the opera 
performance, $4.50. 

They may be purchased with the regular series tick- 
ets, priced at $8.00 and available at Page Box Office 
and the Durham Arts Council. Individual performance 
tickets are priced at $4.00. 

OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 
FALL CLASS SCHEDULE 

The Duke University Office of Continuing Educa- 
tion announces a widely-varied short course program 
for the Fall season. Registration is open to all area 
residents without prerequisite. A detailed brochure is 
available upon request through the office at 107 Bi- 
vens, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, or by 
phoning 684-6259. Classes to be taught are: Savoir- 
Vivre: Getting around France (and the French); 
Whodunit?: The Reading and Writing of Mystery Fic- 
tion; Masters of Photography: Illusions or Reality; An 
Architectural Survey of North Carolina; Modern 
Southern Fiction; GRE Informational Session; Words 
as Tools; Math Workshop: Fear of Figuring; English 
as a Second Language; Speed Reading and Com- 



prehension; SAT Study Group; Separation and Di- 
vorce; Communication Skills; Working Women in 
Transition; Couples Communications; Drama Work- 
shop; Mothers and Daughters; Returning Students: 
What Can You Do?; Wholistic Health Day; Money 
Management (a home-study course); Conflict of Inter- 
est: A growing Problem for Working Couples, and 
Musical Theatre in Western Civilization. 

Further information on these courses or other pro- 
grams is available by calling the office of Continuing 
Education, 684-6259. Early registration is advised to 
avoid disappointment, as many classes allow limited 
enrollment. 

CHILDREN'S FILM SERIES 

The Freewater Children's Film Series will include 
six films this semester. Films will be shown on Satur- 
days in the Gross Chemistry Lab Auditorium, begin- 
ning at 10:30 a.m. Each feature will be preceded by a 
short film or cartoon. Admission is $1.50 or $4.50 for 
season tickets. The September 8th showing is free. 
The films and showing dates are: 
Sept. 8 "The Beast of Monsieur Racine" 

"The Red Balloon:" "Zlateh the Goat"; "Pawnshop" 
Sept. 22 "The Adventures of Robin Hood" 
Oct. 6 "Yellow Submarine" 
Oct. 20 "The Island of the Blue Dolphins" 
Nov. 10 "The 5000 Fingers of Dr. T" 
Dec. 1 "The Miracle of 34th Street" 

ROUND TABLE ON SCIENCE AND 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURE SERIES 

The Round Table on Science and Public Affairs is an 
activity of the Duke University Graduate School with 
a severalfold purpose: to inform members of the 
academic community concerning the constructive 
roles of science and engineering in society, to encour- 
age scientists and engineers to contribute to the solu- 
tion of societal problems in those instances where their 
special competence is relevant, to contribute to the 
preparation of scientists and engineers for careers in 
public service, to contribute to the improvement of 
education in science at the precollegiate levels, and to 
increase the public's understanding of science and 
technology and their place in the modern world. 

As part of this commitment, the Round Table each 
year arranges a series of public lectures and coffee 
hours at which leading experts discuss major national 
and international problems to which science and 
technology are — or could be — significantly related. 
Accordingly, the Round Table is pleased to announce 
the following schedule of lectures for 1978-79. 

September 26 — The Honorable Lucy Wilson Benson, Undersec- 
retary for Security Assistance, Science and Technology. De- 
partment of State 

October 24 — The Honorable Harold Levanthal, Circuit Judge. 
U. S. Court of Appeals, Washington. D. C. 

October 31 — Dr. Arthur Bueche, Senior Vice President for Cor- 
porate Technology, The General Electric Co. 

November 28 — The Honorable Elmer B. Staats, Comptroller 
General of the United States. General Accounting Office 
December 4 — Dr. John M. Deutch, Director of Energy Re- 
search, U. S. Department of Energy 



January 23 — Congressman George E. Brown, Jr., of California, 

Chairman of the House Subcommittee on Science, Research and 

Technology 

January 30— Ms. Barbara Culliton, Editor, News and Comment, 

Science. 

February 27 — Dr. Frank Press, Director, Office of Science and 

Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President 

March 5 — Dr. William O. Baker, President, Bell Laboratories. 

All lectures will be held at 8:15 p.m. in the au- 
ditorium of the Paul M. Gross Chemical Laboratory. 
On the following morning a coffee will be held between 
10:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon in the Commons Room, 
Room 331, Sociology-Psychology Building. All mem- 
bers of the university community are cordially invited 
to attend the lectures and to meet the visiting speaker 
and exchange views on the topic of the lecture at the 
morning coffee. 

Persons desiring additional information on the 
Round Table may contact the Graduate School Office 
(684-3913). 

1979-1980 
COLLOQUIA SERIES 
INSTITUTE OF POLICY SCIENCES 
AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
The Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs 
which was created in 1971 is committed to the study of 
public policy. It is an academic department which 
conducts research and offers degree programs at the 
undergraduate, graduate and professional levels. In 
support of traditional coursework, the Institute spon- 
sors lecture series and colloquia which bring to Duke 
speakers from many disciplines and professions. 

During the 1979-80 academic year, a series of speak- 
ers will focus on a single issue, "The Fate of Social 
Programs in an Age of Fiscal Austerity." 

The speakers will address this topic from their dif- 
ferent perspectives. Speeches are open to the public 
and will be held at 3:00 p.m. in 204 Perkins, unless 
otherwise indicated: 



October 8: 



October 24: 



November 14: 



Lead-off speaker — J. Michael McGinnis, M.D.. 
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health, De- 
partment of Health, Education and Welfare. 
Dr. Robert W. Hartman, Economic Studies 
Program, The Brookings Institution. 
Dr. Robert D. Reischauer. Deputy Director, 
Congressional Budget Office. 
Mr. Joel Havemann, Deputy Editor, National 
Journal. 

January 23: Dr. Rudolph G. Penner, American Enterprise 

Institute 

February: TBA 

March 26: Dr. Frank Levy, The Urban Institute. 

Other Speakers and Events 
In addition to the single focus series, other speakers 

have been invited to visit and speak on a variety of 

topics. 

January 25: Co-sponsor with Major Speakers Union, Duke 

Law Forum and North Carolina Press Associa- 
tion of Presidential Candidates and Journalists 
Forum, Cameron Indoor Stadium, 8:00 p.m. 

PERKINS LIBRARY EXHIBIT 
DUKE UNIVERSITY CARILLON 
An exhibit detailing the history of the Duke Univer- 
sity Carillon, from its conception to the present, is on 



display in the lobby of the Undergraduate Library at 
Perkins Library. Using materials, photographs, and 
music from the University Archives and the Duke 
Music Library, the exhibit traces the development of 
the carillon and highlights the careers of Duke's caril- 
loneurs, Anton Brees and J. Samuel Hammond. Of 
special interest are original carillon recital programs, 
the daily carillon log of J. Samuel Hammond, and 
photographs of the carillon and its installation. A rare 
recording of an Anton Brees recital of the Duke Caril- 
lon highlights this exhibit. The exhibit on the Duke 
Carillon, prepared by Gary S. Lloyd of the Under- 
graduate Library, may be seen now through the month 
of September. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 
Following is the schedule for the Duke University 
Library, 1979-1980. Any deviations from this 
schedule, such as Thanksgiving, Exam Period, 
Christmas, New Year, Spring Recess, Final Exam 
Period, and Summer Session, will be posted and dis- 
tributed. The Library now has a telephone number 
with a recording giving the hours the Library is open. 
The telephone number is 684-3009. 

Perkins Library 

Monday-Friday 8 am-midnight 

Saturday 9 am-6 pm 

Sunday 2 pm-midnight 

(The Circulation Desk discontinues service 15 minutes before the 

building closes) 



Interlibrary Loan 






Monday-Friday 
Saturday & Sunday 




8 am-5 pm 
Closed 


Manuscript Department 






Monday-Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 




8 am-5:30 pm 
9am-12:30 pm 
Closed 


Newspapers & Microform 


Dept 




Monday- Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 




8 am-10 pm 

9 am-5 pm 
2 pm-10 pm 


Photo Services 






Monday-Friday 
Saturday & Sunday 




8 am-5 pm 
Closed 


(A Change Machine is located in the sub-basement. Coin-op copy 
machines are located in the sub-basement and the Deryl Hart Room) 


Public Documents 






Monday- Friday 

Saturday 
Sunday 




8 am-5 pm 
7 pm-10 pm 

9 am-5 pm 
2 pm-6 pm 


Rare Book Room 






Monday-Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 




8:30 am-5 pm 
9 am-1 pm 
Closed 


Reference Department 






Monday-Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 




8:30 am-10 pm 
9 am-5 pm 
2 pm-10 pm 


Undergraduate Library 






Monday-Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 




8 am-midnight 

9 am- 10:30 pm 
12:30 pm-midnight 



University Archives 



Monday-Friday 


8 am-5 pm 


Saturday & Sunday 


Closed 


BRANCH LIBRARIES 


Biology 1 Forestry Library 




Monday-Thursday 


8 am-5 pm 




7 pm-11 pm 


Friday 


8 am-5 pm 


Saturday 


9 am-5 pm 


Sunday 


2 pm-11 pm 


Chemistry Library 




Monday-Thursday 


8:15-11 pm 


Friday 


8:15-5 pm 


Saturday 


9 am-5 pm 


Sunday 


1 pm-11 pm 


Divinity School Library 




Monday-Friday 


8 am-1 1 pm 


Saturday 


9 am-5 pm 


Sunday 


2 pm-6 pm 


East Campus Libary 




Monday-Thursday 


8 am-midnight 


Friday 


8 am- 10:30 pm 


Saturday 


9am-10:30pm 


Sunday 


12:30 pm-midnight 


Engineering Library 




Monday-Thursday 


8 am-midnight 


Friday 


8 am-7 pm 


Saturday 


9 am-5 pm 


Sunday 


2 pm-midnight 


Math/Physics Library 




Monday-Thursday 


8 am-11 pm 


Friday 


8 am-5 pm 


Saturday 


Closed 


Sunday 


1 pm-11 pm 


Music Library 




Monday-Friday 


8 ami 1 pm 


Saturday 


9 am-5 pm 


Sunday 


2 pm-11 pm 




CLOSED 


Nov. 22 




Dec. 22-25 




Dec. 30 through Jan. 1 




May 11 





School Supplies 
Soda Fountain 
Magazines, Misc 



School Supplies 
Soda Fountain 



DUKE UNIVERSITY STORES 

Union Bldg.— (Tel. 684-2344) 
Mon.-Fri. Sat. 

5:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
5:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
S:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

E. Campus Store— Crowell Bldg. (Tel. 684-3473) 
8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. CLOSED 
D. U. Bookstore— Union Bldg. (Tel. 684-6793) 
8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. CLOSED 
Gothic Bookshop— Page Bldg. (Tel. 684-3986) 
8:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m. CLOSED 
Med. Center Bookstore— Seeley G. Mudd Bldg. (Tel. 684-2717) 
8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. CLOSED 
Stores Operations Office— 2111 Campus Dr. (Tel. 684-5132) 

8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. CLOSED 
Vending Service Dept.— E. & W. Campuses (Tel. 684-3762) 
24 hr. service 



7:30- 9:30 A.M. 
11:30- 2:00 P.M. 
5:00- 7:00 P.M. 
9:00-11:00 A.M. 



DINING HALLS 
HOURS OF OPERATION 

The West Campus Dining Halls will begin their reg- 
ular operating schedule on the following dates: 
Blue and White Room Cafeteria: Wed., Aug. 29 
The Oak Room Thurs., Aug. 30 

(CLOSED Labor Day, Sept. 3) 

Cambridge Inn Thurs., Aug. 30 9:00 a.m. 

The Sprig will open regular hours on Tuesday, Sep- 
tember 4th. 

SCHEDULE OF HOURS 

WEST CAMPUS DINING HALLS 
MONDAY thru FRIDAY— Blue & White Room 

Breakfast 

Lunch 

Dinner 

Snack Bar 

(When Cambridge Inn is closed) 
SATURDAY— Blue & White Room 

Breakfast 8:30-10:30 A.M. 

Snack Bar 9:00-11:00 A.M. 

Lunch 11:30- 2:00 P.M. 

Dinner 5:00- 7:00 P.M. 

SUNDAY— Blue & White Room 

Breakfast 9:00-11:00 A.M. 

Lunch 11:30- 2:00 P.M. 

Dinner 5:00- 7:00 P.M. 

THE OAK ROOM 
Monday thru Friday and Sunday (Open Saturday for Home Football 
Games) 

Lunch 11:30- 2:00 P.M. 

Dinner 5:00- 7:00 P.M. 

THE CAMBRIDGE INN 
Monday thru Friday and Sunday (Closed Saturday) 

SNACK BAR 9:00-12:30 A.M. 

Sunday 2:00-12:30 A.M. 

NOTE: Saturday only, breakfast will be served from 8:30 a.m.- 
10:30 a.m. Sunday only, breakfast will be served from 9:00 a.m.- 
11:00 a.m. All dining rooms on West Campus will open for their 
regular meal hours Tuesday, September 5. The operating hours of 
the other West Campus food services will be posted in The Chroni- 
cle, the student newspaper. 

Trent Drive Dining Hall 

Cafeteria 
Monday-Friday Breakfast 7:30 a.m.- 9:30 a.m. 

(Tues. and Thurs.. Lunch 11:15a.m.- 1:30p.m. 

Breakfast, 6:30 a.m.) Dinner 5:00 p.m.- 6:30 p.m. 

8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m. 
11:30a.m.- 1:30p.m. 
5:00 p.m.- 6:30 p.m. 
8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m. 
11:30a.m.- 1:30p.m. 
5:00 p.m.- 6:30 p.m. 



7:45 a.m.- 9:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m.- 9:30 a.m. 
11:30a.m.- 2:00p.m. 

5:00p.m.- 6:30p.m. 

8:30 a.m.- 9:30 a.m. 

9:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m. 
11:30 a.m.- 1:30 p.m. 

5:00 p.m.- 6:30 p.m. 



Saturday 


Breakfast 

Lunch 

Dinner 


Sunday 


Breakfast 

Lunch 

Dinner 




GrodelTs Lounge 


Monday-Friday 


9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 




East Campus Dining Hal 


Monday-Friday 


Breakfast 

Continental Breakfast 
Lunch 
Dinner 


Saturday and Sunday 


Breakfast 

Continental Breakfast 
Lunch 
Dinner 



SEPTEMBER CALENDAR 



WEDNESDAY 



3 



;ept.-Oct 1 CHRIS 

SIZEMORE. 

Paintings. W. 

Campus Gallery 

(104 Flowers). 

1:00 am Chapel: 
. The Rev. Robert T 
, Young 
':00&9 15 p.m. Quad 

Flicks BUDDY 

HOLLY STORY." 

Page Aud. $1.50. 

:00 & 10 00 p.m. 

Duke Players 
' Freshman Week 

Show THE 

PUBLIC EYE." 

Branson Theatre. 

Free 



Labor Day 
7:30 & 9:30 p.m. 

Freewater Film for 

Freshmen 

"MIDNIGHT 

COWBOY." Bio. 

Sci. Aud. 



9 



lO 



1:00 a.m. Chapel 4 00-6:00 p.m. 

The Rev. Dr. Wm. STUDENT 

Sloane Coffin. ACTIVITIES DAY. 

00 & 9 15 p.m. Quad Main Quad. 
Flicks. CHINA 
SYNDROME Page 
Aud. $1.50. 



16 



17 



1:00 a.m. Chapel. 

The Rev Robert T. 

Young. 
':00 p.m. Arts in Duke 

Chapel: ORGAN 

RECITAL. JOHN 

MUELLER Chapel. 
1:00. 7 00& 9:15 p.m. 

Quad Flicks: 

"AUTUMN 

SONATA. Page 

Aud. $1.50. 



24 



11:00 am. Chapel: 
The Rev Dr Wm. H. 
Willimon. 

7:00 & 9 30 pm. Quad 
Flicks "JAWS." 
Page Aud. $1.50. 



30 

11:00 a.m. Chapel 
TBA 

3:00 p.m. D. U. Wind 
Symphony Garden 
Concert. Sarah B. 
Duke Memorial 
Gardens (If rain. 
Baldwin Aud.) 

700&9 00 p.m. Quad 
Flicks: GREASE." 
Page Aud. $1.50. 



Sept. 4-Oct. 9 SARAH 
VINCENT. 
Weavings. E. 
Campus Library. 

9:00 a.m. Fall 
Semester classes 
begin. 

3:00-6 00 p.m. D.U.U. 
Crafts Center 
registration for Fall 
classes. 

7:30 & 9:30 p.m. 
Freewater Films: 
"THE DOVE"; THE 
SEVENTH SEAL." 
Bio. Sci. Aud. Free, 
D. U. under- 
grads/l. D. $1.50. 
Others. 



11 



IS 



4 00 p.m. D.U.U. 
Major Speaker. 
FREDERIC 
STORASKA: "How 
to Say No' to a 
Rapist and 
Survive." Main 
Quad (If rain. Page). 

7:30 & 9:30 p.m. 
Freewater Film: 
"WILD 

STRAWBERRIES." 
Bio. Sci. Aud. Free. 
D. U. under- 
grads/l. D. $1.50, 
Others. 



Sept. 12-14. Forestry 
Environmental 
Studies 
Symposium. 



18 



19 



6:30 p.m. Women's 

Volleyball: DUKE vs 

APPALACHIAN 

ST. U. 
7:30 & 9:30 p.m. 

Freewater Film: 

"THE VIRGIN 

SPRING." Bio. Sci. 

Aud. Free, D. U. 

undergrads/l. D. 

$1.50, Others. 
8:00 p.m. D. U. U. 

Major Attraction: 

MIKE CROSS. Page 

Aud. $6 Gen. Pub.; 

$5 D. Stu. 



10:00 a.m. Duke 
University 

Newcomers' Coffee. 
1508 Pinecrest Rd. 



25 



26 



7:30 & 9:30 p.m. 
Freewater Film: 
"ALL SCREWED 
UP." Bio. Sci. Aud. 
Free, D U. 
undergrads/l. D. 
$1.50. Others. 



6 



7:30 & 9:30 p.m. 
Freewater Film: 
"MR. SMITH GOES 
TO WASHINGTON." 
Bio. Sci. Aud. Free, 
D. U. under- 
grads/l. D. $1.50. 
Others. 



13 



7:30 & 9:30 p.m. 
Freewater Films: 
"THE UGLY 
DUCKLING '; 
"STAGECOACH." 
Bio. Sci. Aud. Free. 
D. U. under- 
grads/l. D. $1.50, 
Others. 



20 



7:30 & 9:30 p.m. 
Freewater Films: 
"SKINNY THE 
MOOCHER"; 
"DARK VICTORY." 
Bio. Sci. Aud. Free. 
D. U. under- 
grads/l. D. $1.50, 
Others. 

8:15 p.m. BSA 
Speaker: HOYT 
FULLER. Page Aud. 



2T 



1:15 p.m. Round 
Table Lecture: THE 
HON. LUCY 
WILSON BENSON. 
Gross Chem. Lab. 
Aud. 



7:30 4 9:30 p.m. 

Freewater Films: 
OLD GLORY"; 
NINOTCHKA." Bio. 

Sci. Aud Free, D. U. 

undergrads/ 

I. D. $1.50, Others. 
8:00 p.m. N. C. 

Symphony Orch. 

JAIME LAREDO, 

Violinist. Page Aud. 

$6 Gen. Pub.; $3 

Stu./65+. 



7:30, 9:00 p.m. & 
Midnight. Freewater 
Film: "MIDNIGHT 
EXPRESS." Bio Sci. 
Aud Free. D U. 
undergrads/l. D. 
$1.50, Others. 

8:15 p.m. Duke 
Players: THE 
PUBLIC EYE." 
Branson Theatre. 
$2.50 All Seats. 



14 



7:30. 9:00 p.m. & 
Midnight. Freewater 
Film: "CHILDREN 
OF PARADISE." 
Bio. Sci. Aud. Free, 
D. U. under- 
grads/l. D. $1.50. 
Others. 



21 



6:30 p.m. Women's 
Volleyball: DUKE vs. 
ST. AUGUSTINE 
COLLEGE. 

7:30, 9:00 p.m. & 
Midnight. Freewater 
Film: "THE HILLS 
HAVE EYES." Bio. 
Sci. Aud. Free, D. U. 
undergrads/l. D. 
$1.50. 



28 



7:30. 9:00 & Midnight. 
Freewater Film: 
"WOODSTOCK. " 
Bio. Sci. Aud. Free, 
D. U. under- 
grads/l. D. $1.50, 
Others. 



10:00 a.m. D. U. 
Botany Dept. 
Greenhouses Plant 
sale begins. The Ark 
(E. Campus). 

10:30 a.m. Freewater 
Children's Films: 
"BEAST OF M. 
RACINE;" "ZLATEH 
THE GOAT"; "RED 
BALLOON"; 
"PAWN SHOP." 
Gross Chem. Lab. 
Aud. Free (This 
showing only). 

7:00&9:15p.m.Quad 
Flicks: "CHINA 
SYNDROME." Page 
Aud. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Duke 
Players: "THE 
PUBLIC EYE." 
Branson Theatre. 
$2.50 All Seats. 



lo 



11:00 a.m. Soccer. 

DUKE vs 

DAVIDSON. 
1:30 p.m. Football. 

DUKE vs ECU. W. 

Wade Stad. 
8:30 p.m. Music 

Dept.: DOC 

DIKEMAN'S "BIG 

BAND '86." Page 

Aud. Free. 



22 



Rosh Hashanah 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 
N. C. Geneological 
Society & 
Manuscripts Dept. 
Meeting. Page Aud. 

10:30 a.m. Freewater 
Children's Films: 
"RABBIT HOOD"; 
"ADVENTURES OF 
ROBIN HOOD." 
Gross Chem. Lab. 
Aud. $1.50. 

7:00& 9:30 p.m. Quad 
Flicks: "JAWS." 
Page Aud. $1.50. 



29 



7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quad 
Flicks: "GREASE." 
Page Aud. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. N. C. 
CHAMBER 
PLAYERS. EDMR. 
Season Tickets $8; 
Sgl. $4. 



Gilbert-Addoms Cafeteria will open on the first day of classes. 
Until then students who normally obtain meals in Gilbert-Addoms 
will be served in the East Campus Union. The Down Under will 
open at 8:00 p.m. the evening of the first day of classes. 

Please check regular serving hours which will be posted after 
Orientation Week. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Ms. Julia Glenn Hester for 
the Ph.D. degree in Education was held on Wednes- 
day, August 29th. The subject of Ms. Hester's disser- 
tation was "Sex Differences in the Structural De- 
velopment of Self : Concept Across Grades Nine 
Through Eleven.'* The committee conducting the 
examination consisted of Professors Robert N. 
Sawyer, Chairman; Robert Ballantyne, Robert Colver, 
Lucy Davis, and Everett Hopkins. 

DUKE HOMESITES— HOUSE FOR SALE 

Only those homes located on lots originally de- 
veloped and sold by the University and which are still 
owned by a member of the faculty or staff of the Uni- 
versity will be listed in the University Calendar. Fred 
E. Miller, 684-2054, has information regarding listings. 
Persons interested in information about a particular 
house should call the number listed with the house. 
LOCATION: 152 Pinecrest Road 
Phone: 489-8198 
Number of Bedrooms: Five (5) 
Number of Baths: VA 
Type of Heating/ Air Conditioning: Oil heat 

Page Box Office, located on West Campus (to the 
left of the Duke Chapel as you face the Chapel) is open 
Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. Tickets may be 
purchased in person, using cash, check (with two 
forms of I.D.), travelers' checks, and Master Charge 



or Visa. Tickets for most events may be purchased by 
telephone (684-4059; 684-3227) from 10:00 a.m.-3:00 
p.m., using Master Charge or Visa. (Please note: The 
box office does not hold tickets without payment.) 

Tickets may also be ordered by mail. The person 
requesting tickets should indicate the name of the 
event, the date, the number of tickets desired, and the 
ticket price. Checks should be made payable to the 
sponsor of the event. A self-addressed, stamped en- 
velope should also be enclosed with the order. (Mail 
orders without a return envelope are held at the box 
office for pick-up prior to curtain time.) 



DUKE UNIVERSITY YEARLY CALENDAR 

The 1979-80 Yearly Calendar is in the mail to all 
members of the University Community, Calendar 
subscribers, and interested friends at their home 
address. Those who do not receive a copy by mail 
may secure the Calendar at the Flowers Information 
Desk. 

Undergraduate students will receive one Calen- 
dar for each residential room. Graduate students 
will receive copies in individual boxes in de- 
partmental offices where available. Graduate stu- 
dents in the School of Arts and Sciences may get 
copies of the Calendar in the Graduate School of- 
fice. Room 124 Allen. 

SCHEDULING OF EVENTS AND MEETINGS 
The University requests that all special meetings 
and events to be held on the campus be registered 
with the Duke University Calendar. This will 
greatly facilitate the handling of such information 
and prevent unnecessary conflicts. The Calendar 
office is located in 108 Page, telephone 684-5578. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



calendar: 




September 9-16, 1979 



Mlume 79 



Published September 7. 1979 



Number 2 



Sunday, September 9 

9:30 & 11:30 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Gray Bldg., Di- 
vinity School). 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. Wm. Sloane Coffin. Senior Minister, 
Riverside Church. N.Y.C. 

11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults, $3.50; children under 12. Vi price. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Tour. 

3:00-5:00 p.m. Reception. EXHIBITION OF DYED WOVEN 
SILKS by SARAH G. VINCENT sponsored by D.U.U. 
Galleries Committee. E. Gallery Book Lovers Rm., E. Cam- 
pus Library. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: -CHINA SYNDROME." 
Tension-filled thriller about politics involved when nuclear 
reactor threatens disaster. Jane Fonda, Michael Douglas. 
Jack Lemon. Page Aud. $1.50. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Committee to Reverse the Arms Race. Discussion 
led by the Rev. Dr. Wm. Sloane Coffin, Jr.: "The Arms Race: 
What's at the Finish Line?" York Chapel, Divinity School. 

Monday, September 10 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 

10:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m. SALE OF ORIGINAL ORIENTAL ART 
from the Marson Galleries, sponsored by the D.U.U. Gal- 
leries Committee. Rm. 101 Union Bldg. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. STUDENT ACTIVITIES DAY. Main Quad. 

4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Martha Crump. 
Rm. Ill 

7:00-1:00 p.m. Duke Players Auditions for As You Like It. Branson 
Theatre. 

Tuesday, September 11 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics and Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
R. Bruce Nicklas. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Anthony 
Means. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. D.U.U. Major Speaker, FREDERICK STORASKA: 
"How to Say No' to a Rapist and Survive." Main Quad (If 
rain. Page Aud). 

7:30 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film: "WILD STRAWBERRIES." 
Traveling to receive an honorary degree, an aging doctor is 
confronted with flashbacks and memories which reveal the 
depths of his psyche. Grand Prize, Berlin Film Festival. Bio. 
Sci. Aud. Free. D.U. undergrads/I.D. $1.50, others. 

7:00-10:00 p.m. Duke Players Auditions for As You Like It. Bran- 
son Theatre. 

Wednesday, September 12 

September 12-14: Forestry Environmental Studies Symposium 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 



Thursday, September 13 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 

10:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m. D.U.U. Special Events Committee PLANT 
SALE. Main Quad, W. Campus. 

12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 

3:45 p.m. Meeting of the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts 
and Sciences. Rm. 139 Soc. Sci. Bldg. 

7:30 p.m. & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "STAGECOACH." 
John Wayne's burst into stardom began as the Ringo Kid in 
this giant western. Chase scene finale. Also, Disney's "The 
Ugly Duckling." Bio. Sci. Aud. Free. D.U. undergrads/I.D. 
$1.50, others. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Chapter, Amnesty International. Room 204 Per- 
kins Library. 

Friday, September 14 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Botany Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Steve 

Oberbauer. Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry. Speaker: Dr. Chas. F. Stevens. 

Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
1 :00 p.m. Duke Islamic Assoc. Prayers. Rm. 226 Perkins Library. 
3:30 p.m. Dept. of Chemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. R. G. Den- 
ning. Rm. 103 Gross Chem. Lab. 
7:30, 9:00 p.m. & Midnight. Freewater Film: "CHILDREN OF 
PARADISE." Drama about crisscrossed passions of a group 
of Parisian clowns, charlatans, and tragedians in the mid- 
nineteenth century. Bio. Sci. Aud. Free, D.U. under- 
grads/I.D. $1.50, others. 

Saturday, September 15 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 
11:00 a.m. SOCCER: Duke vs. Davidson 
1:30 p.m. Football: Duke vs. EAST CAROLINA. W. Wade 

Stadium. 
5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Gray Bldg., Divinity 

School). 
8:30 p.m. Dept. of Music presents DOC DIKEMANS "BIG 
BAND '86." Page Aud. Free. 

Sunday, September 16 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Gray Bldg.. Di- 
vinity School). 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Robert T. Young. Minister to the Univer- 
sity. 
11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room. E. Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults, $3.50; children under 12, '/i price. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

4:00, 7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "AUTUMN 
SONATA." Ingrid Bergman as concert pianist responding to 
anguish and hostility of her daughter, played by Liv Ullman. 
Ingmar Bergman film. Page Aud. $1.50. 

7:00 p.m. Arts in the Chapel Organ Recital: JOHN MUELLER 
(N. C. School of the Arts). Chapel. Free. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of September 16th- 
23rd is Monday, September 10th, before 3:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



*DUKE PLAYERS 
Performances in Branson Theatre 
THE PUBLIC EYE 



SEASON TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE 

Season (or series) tickets, which represent a sub- 
stantial savings over the price of single ticket admis- 
sion prices, are now available for the following events: 

DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 

Performances at 8:15 p.m., Page Auditorium 

Series Tickets: $33; $28; $23 

MURRAY PERAHIA, Pianist 
NICOLAI GEDDA, Metropolitan Opera Tenor 
JEAN-PIERRE RAMPAL. Flutist 
VIENNA CHAMBER ORCHESTRA with 

PHILIPPE ENTREMONT 
LES GRANDS BALLETS CANADIENS: 

ROMEO & JULIET 
SALVATORE ACCARDO, Violinist 

BROADWAY AT DUKE 

Performances at 8:30 p.m., Page Auditorium 

Season Tickets: $37.50; $33: $28.50 



Oct. 


19 


Nov 


4 


Jan. 


15 


Jan. 


29 


Feb. 


2 


Mar 


19 



Oct. 


4 


ESTELLE PARSONS IN MISS 
MARGARIDAS WAY 


Oct. 


24 


CHICAGO 


Nov 


16 


JULIE HARRIS in THE BELLE OF 
AMHERS T 


Jan. 


18 


MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING. 
The National Shakespeare Company 


Feb. 


8 


P. S. YOUR CAT IS DEAD 


Mar 


23 


A/AT T MISBEHAVIN' 



AS YOU LIKE IT 



THE BEEPLE, OR JOHN WILLY AND 
THE BEE PEOPLE 



2 RING ROUND THE MOON 



Sept. 7 & 8 
Oct. 18-21; 

Oct. 25-28 
Nov. 30-Dec. 2; 

Dec. 7-9 

Feb. 21-24; 

Feb. 28-Mar. 
Apr. 17-20; 

Apr. 24-27 TO YS IN THE A TTIC 

*Because of the various performance times, seating arrange- 
ments, and Season Ticket Plans ($12.50, $10.50, $9.50, $7.50), it is 
suggested that playgoers review the Duke Players brochure, avail- 
able from Duke Players, P. O. Box 6936, College Station, Durham, 
NC 27708; 684-3181. 

NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Performances at 8:00 p.m., Page Auditorium 

Season Membership: 

$15 Gen. Public 

1 7.50 D. U. Student with I. D. 

$ 9 Other Students/65 + 
Sept. 27 JAIME LAREDO, Violinist 
Nov. 7 MISHA DICHTER. Pianist 

Feb. 1 1 GUHER and SUHER PEKINEL, Duo-pianists 

Apr. 21 MICHELE DJOKIC, Cellinist 

CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
Performances at 8:15 p.m., East Duke Building Music Room 
(unless otherwise announced) 

Season Membership: $25 

Tickets available: P. O. Box 6065, College Station, Durham, NC 
27708; tel. 684-3836. 

Oct. 20 MURRAY PERAHIA and the CIOMPI QUARTET 

Nov. 17 CLEVELAND QUARTET 
Jan. 26 FRESK QUARTET (Stockholm) 

Feb. 23 JUILLIARD QUARTET 

Apr. 5 BEVERIDGE and MICHAEL WEBSTER, 

Clarinet and Piano 

N. C. CHAMBER PLAYERS 

Performances at 8:15 p.m., East Duke Building Music Room 

Season Tickets: $8 

Sept. 29 Nov. 27 Jan. 27 

TRIANGLE DANCE GUILD 
Performances at 8:00 p.m.. Page Auditorium 
Season Tickets: $12 Gen. Public 
$9 Students/65 + 
Oct. 22-26 ALVIN AILEY REPERTORY ENSEMBLE 
Feb. 4-23 WASHINGTON BALLET COMPANY 
Mar. 24-29 PAULINE KONER CONSORT 

(Please see "Page Box Office Information," this Calendar, for 
specific ticket ordering information for events other than those 
sponsored by the Chamber Arts Society.) 

DUKE UNION GALLERIES 
COMMITTEE EXHIBIT 

The art work of Chris Sizemore is being exhibited 
September 2nd through October 1st in the West Gal- 
lery, 104 Flowers. The film Three Faces of Eve, de- 
scribing a woman with a multi-person personality, was 
based upon the life of Chris Sizemore. A fully- 
integrated personality for many years now, Ms. Size- 
more has recently written an autobiography entitled 
I'm Eve. Ms. Sizemore's art exhibition consists of 
works created by former personalities, as well as art 
work from the present. 



D.U.U GALLERIES COMMITTEE: 
SARAH VINCENT WEAVINGS 

The Ikat weavings of Sarah Vincent are now being 
shown in the East Gallery, East Campus Library. 
September 2nd through October 9th. A reception will 
be held Sunday. September 9th, from 3:00-5:00 p.m. 
on the steps of the East Campus Library. 

ARMS RACE DISCUSSION 

The Duke Committee to Reverse the Arms Race is 
sponsoring a discussion led by the Rev. William 
Sloane Coffin, Jr. this Sunday evening, September 9th, 
at 7:30 in York Chapel, Gray Building. The topic will 
be "The Arms Race — What's at the Finish Line' 1 " 

On the following evening, Monday, September 10th, 
a small group interested in studying the issue of nu- 
clear disarmament will have its first meeting. The 
place will be the Conference Room in the basement of 
the Chapel, and the time will be 7:00 p.m. Anyone 
interested is welcome to come. 

CAREER APPRENTICESHIPS 

Undergraduate apprenticeships for persons wanting 
to explore career interests several hours a week are 
available on campus or in local business, government, 
and other organizations. Interviews will be held week- 
day mornings beginning Monday, September 10th, and 
continuing through Friday, September 21st. Informa- 
tion about these voluntary opportunities is available 
from Gordon Stanley, Office of Placement Services, 
214 Flowers: tel. 684-3813. 



D.U.U. GALLERIES COMMITTEE 
SPONSORS ORIENTAL ART SALE 

The D.U. Union Galleries Committee will sponsor a 
sale of original oriental art by the Marson Galleries on 
Monday, September 10th, from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 
in Room 101 Union Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, September 10th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111, 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Martha Crump, De- 
partment of Zoology, University of Florida, will speak 
on "Size and Relationships of Amphibian Eggs." 
Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES DAY 

The Duke Student Activities Day will be held Mon- 
day, September 10th, from 6:00-10:00 p.m. on the 
Main Quad, West Campus. This event will give stu- 
dents an opportunity to survey the existing organiza- 
tions in the Duke-Durham community and to decide in 
which ones they want to participate. 



PLANT SYSTEMATICS 
AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Dr. Bruce Nicklas, Professor of Zoology, Duke 
University, will present a seminar entitled "DNA for 
Students of Systematics and Evolution" on Tuesday, 
September 11th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 130 Biological 
Sciences Building. 

RAPE PREVENTION PROGRAM 

Frederick Storaska will present his internationally- 
acclaimed rape prevention program "How to Say 'No' 
to a Rapist and Survive" on Tuesday, September 1 1th, 
at 4:00 p.m. on the Main Quad, West Campus. Rain 
location will be Page Auditorium. The program is 
sponsored by the D.U. Union Major Speakers Com- 
mittee and Duke Public Safety. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Anthony Means, Ph.D., Professor of Cell Biology, 
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, will 
speak at a seminar on Tuesday, September 11th, at 
4:00 p.m. in 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. The 
seminar topic is "Calmodulin: A Likely Candidate for 
the Intracellular Calcium Receptor." The seminar is 
sponsored by a Pharmacological Sciences Training 
Grant, Department of Pharmacology. Coffee will be 
served in the lobby at 3:45 p.m. 

D.U.U. SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE 
SPONSORS PLANT SALE 

The D.U. Union Special Events Committee will 
sponsor the Rain Forest Company plant sale on 
Thursday, September 13th, from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 
p.m. on the Main Quad, West Campus. 

MEETING OF THE UNDERGRADUATE 
FACULTY COUNCIL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

There will be a meeting of the Undergraduate Fac- 
ulty Council of Arts and Sciences on Thursday, Sep- 
tember 13th, at 3:45 p.m., in 139 Social Sciences 
Building. 

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL MEETING 

Thursday, September 13th, at 7:30 p.m. in Room 204 
Perkins Library, the Duke Chapter of Amnesty Inter- 
national will have a special organizational meeting 
with an emphasis on informing potential members. The 
case of a young South American woman who was im- 
prisoned, later adopted by the Duke Chapter, and re- 
cently released, will be reviewed, providing prospec- 
tive AI workers with insight into the Duke Chapter's 
techniques. All interested persons are urged to attend 
and explore how they can utilize their skills in support 
of the human rights of oppressed people throughout 
the world. Professor J. D. Barber, Department of Po- 
litical Science, will act as Presiding Officer. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

The Department of Biochemistry will sponsor a 
seminar on Friday, September 14th. at 12:30 p.m. in 
Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. The speaker. 
Dr. Charles F. Stevens, Department of Physiology, 
Yale University School of Medicine, will speak on 
"The Function of the Acepylcholine Receptor in 
Synaptic Transmission." Coffee will be served at 
12:15 p.m. in the lobby. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 
ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Botany will sponsor an ecology 
seminar on Friday, September 14th, at 12:30 p.m. in 
Room 144 Biological Sciences. The speaker, Steve 
Oberbauer, Graduate Student, Department of Botany, 
Duke University, will discuss "Some Aspects of 
Plant-Water Relations in Wet and Dry Tropical Low- 
land Forests." 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. R. G. Denning, Magdalene College, Oxford 
University (England), will present a seminar entitled 
"Recent Developments in Laser Isotope Separation" 
on Friday, September 14th at 3:30 p.m. in Room 103 
Gross Chemical Laboratory. Refreshments will be 
served in the Lobby at 3:10 p.m. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC SPONSORS 
DOC DIKEMAN'S BAND 

Brasses, percussion, piano, and the voice of Carol 
Baron will brighten the stage in Page Auditorium when 
DOC DIKEMAN AND "BIG BAND 86" offer the 
Triangle Area audience the big band sounds of Glenn 
Miller. Stan Kenton, and Count Basie LIVE at 8:30 
p.m. on Saturday, September 15th. 

Ted "Doc" Dikeman, leader of the band, plays 
tenor saxophone. He took up the instrument in 1939 
primarily due to his admiration for Tex Beneke. Dike- 
man joined the very popular Duke Ambassadors while 
attending this university. After graduating from Duke, 
Dikeman attended Georgetown University in the mid 
forties where he became involved in the flourishing 
Washington musical scene. After World War Two, as 
the demand for big bands diminished, Dikeman de- 
voted all of his time to the dental profession. In 1953, 
however, his strong love of the big band sound 
wouldn't let him leave his horn stored away — he began 
to play again. In 1968 he formed his present group, and 
named it the Ambassadors. The orchestra was com- 
posed primarily of college students. Eventually the 
students were replaced with more mature and stable 
musicians. The year 1972 brought forth the present day 
unit which was built around Washington professionals. 

The group caught on with the audience wherever 
they played which took them to the West Indies and 
Hawaii as well as dates in the Washington area. The 
Ambassadors returned to Duke University in the fall of 
1974 to perform in the jazz festival during the dedica- 



tion of the new Mary Duke Biddle Music Building. 

"Doc Dikeman believes that big band music is still 
very popular with young people if they are given the 
opportunity to hear it," says Lou Byers who writes a 
column called HAPPENINGS for a Washington area 
community paper. We believe the same thing. Help 
prove that we're right. Come hear DOC DIKEMAN 
AND "BIG BAND 86!" 

The public is invited. Admission is free. 

ARTS IN DUKE CHAPEL ORGAN RECITAL 

The Arts in Duke Chapel will present John Mueller 
in an organ recital on Sunday, September 16th, at 7:00 
p.m. in the University Chapel. Dr. Mueller has been 
head of the Organ Department at Salem College since 
1957 and is a teacher of organ at the North Carolina 
School of the Arts. He holds degrees from Oberlin 
College, the University of Michigan, and Boston Uni- 
versity. A Fulbright Grantee in Frankfurt, Germany, 
where he studied with Helmut Walcha at the 
Hochschule fur Musik. Dr. Mueller has done addi- 
tional work with Anton Heiller, Luigi Tagliavini, and 
Marie-Claire Alain at the Summer Academy for Organ 
in Haarlem, The Netherlands. He has been guest fac- 
ulty member of the Longy School of Music, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, summer organist and choir- 
master at Harvard University, and North Carolina 
State Chairman of the American Guild of Organists. 

The program follows: 

Fantasia Chromatica Sweelinck 

Quinto Tiento Correa de Arauxo 

Batalha de 6. Ton Anonymous 

Suite on the First Tone Nivers 

Fantasia and Fugue in G Minor Bach 

Fantasia in F minor. K. 594 Mozart 

Piece Heroi'que Franck 

There is no admission charge to the recital. The 
public is invited. 

OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 

A wide variety of short courses and conferences are 
offered to the public by the Duke University Office of 
Continuing Education. Included are courses in skill- 
building, arts and sciences, and personal development. 
A detailed brochure will be mailed upon request, sent 
to Duke University, Office of Continuing Education, 
107 Bivins, Durham, N. C. 27708; tel. 684-6259. 

OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 
DANCE CLASS 

"Dance for the Health of It," a class in aerobic 
dancing, is being offered to the public on Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday mornings, beginning Sep- 
tember 17th for eight weeks. A physical fitness pro- 
gram that exercises hearts and lungs while teaching a 
variety of social dance steps, the course is offered 
through the Duke University Office of Continuing 
Education and taught by Beverly McCraw. Partici- 
pants may register by sending a check for $36.00, pay- 



able to Duke University, to the Office of Continuing 
Education, 107 Bivins, Duke University, Durham, 
N. C. 27708. Further information may be obtained by 
calling 684-6259. 

COMPUTATION CENTER OFFERS 
FREE COURSES 

The Duke Computation Center is offering a series of 
courses on computer programming. The series starts 
with an Introduction to Computing course, which as- 
sumes no background in computer programming. 
These courses are free of charge and are open to all 
members of the Duke community. This includes stu- 
dents, faculty, staff, bi-weekly employees, and mem- 
bers of Duke-related organizations such as the V.A. 
Hospital. Family members of the above are also eligi- 
ble. Classes will meet Monday, Wednesday, and Fri- 
day from 4:00-5:00 p.m. Any course will be cancelled if 
fewer than five people register. To register or obtain 
more information, call Tana Kirzinger at 684-4217. 



UTS 




Dates 


Location 


Instructor 


10 


Introduction 


Sept 17-21 


Zener Auditorium 


Paris 


'30 


Beginning FORTRAN 


Sept 24-Oct 12 


208 Language Bldg. 


Begeman 


31 


Advanced FORTRAN 


Octl5-Nov2 


208 Language Bldg. 


Paris 


20 


Beginning PL/I 


Sept 24-Oct 12 


Zener Auditorium 


Silver 


21 


Advanced PL/I 


Octl5-Nov2 


217 Language Bldg. 


Tuan 


"75 


Beginning COBOL 


Sept 24-Oct 12 


211 Language Bldg. 


Stone 


76 


Advanced COBOL 


Octl5-Nov2 


21 1 Language Bldg. 


Grady 


52 


SPSS 


Sept24-Oct5 


231 Social Sciences 


Poss 


V4 


Beginning APL 


Nov 5-16 


100 North Bldg. 


Grady 


i*, 


Advanced APL 


Nov 26-Dec 7 


100 North Bldg. 


Butler 



MUSEUM OF ART DOCENTS 

The Docents of the Duke University Museum of Art 
invite all interested individuals to join them for coffee 
and orientation at the Art Museum on Monday, Sep- 
tember 17th, for the beginning of their Fall docent 
course. Throughout the year, the trained docents take 
tours of school children and adults through the 
Museum on an appointment basis. A stimulating 
training couse is available every Monday morning dur- 
ing the Winter session for those wishing to participate 
as docents. Further information may be obtained by 
calling Mrs. Robert Bouse, 383-7010. 

MIKE CROSS IN CONCERT 

The Duke University Union Special Events Com- 
mittee and the Major Attractions Committee will co- 
sponsor Mike Cross in concert on Tuesday, September 
18th, at 8:00 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Tickets, now on 
sale at Page Box Office, are priced at $6 for the general 
public and $5 for Duke undergraduate students with 
I.D.'s All tickets are General Admission. 



Correction at Printing 

Freewater films on Tuesdays and Thursdays will 
be shown at 7:00 and 9:30, and on Fridays at 7:00, 
9:30, and 12 midnight. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 

Published by Duke University PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 




like University 

calendar/ 




September 16-23, 1979 



\)lume 79 



Published September 14, 1979 



Number 3 



Sunday, September 16 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Divinity School). 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Mr. Robert T. Young, Minister to the 
University. The Service of Worship is broadcast over WDBS, 
107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -11:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults, $3.50; children under 12, Vi price. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

*4:00. 7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "AUTUMN 
SONATA." Ingrid Bergman as concert pianist'responding to 
anguish and hostility of her daughter, played by Liv Ullman. 
Ingmar Bergman film. Page Aud. $1.50. 
'Please note afternoon performance. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayer Service. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 p.m. Arts in the Chapel Organ Recital: JOHN MUELLER of 

Salem College and the N.S. School of the Arts. Chapel. Free. 

Monday, September 17 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

9:00 a.m. Aerobic Dancing Class, first meeting. Sponsored by Of- 
fice of Continuing Education. 

9:30 a.m. Museum of Art Docents' Meeting. Art Museum. 

4:00 p.m. First Meeting of Introduction to Computers Class. Com- 
putation Center. 

4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Tom Cronin. Rm. 
Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

7:30 p.m. First Meeting of Office of Continuing Education Class. 
Savior-Vivre: Getting around France (and the French). 
E. Campus Center. 

Tuesday, September 18 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 10:00 a.m. Duke Law 
Forum Talk by Chief Justice Richardson of the Hawaii Su- 
preme Court. Brown Lounge of the Law School. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Botany Plant Systematics and Evolution Semi- 
nar. Speaker: Dr. James W. Hardin. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Daniel 
Nebert. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

6:30 p.m. WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL. Duke vs. Appalachian 
State U. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film: "THE VIRGIN SPRING.' Max 
von Sydow stars as a father seeking revenge for rape and 
murder of his daughter. Bio. Sci. Free, D. U. undergrads 
w/I.D.'s. $1.50, others. 

8:00 p.m. D.U.U. presents MIKE CROSS in Concert. Page Aud. 
$6, Gen. Public; $5, Duke undergrads with I.D.'s. All Tickets 
Gen. Adm. 

Wednesday, September 19 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
10:00 a.m. Campus Club NEWCOMERS' COFFEE. Program by 

D. U. staff members. 1508 Pinecrest Rd. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 



Thursday, September 20 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. Memorial Chapel (Duke 
Chapel). 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film: "DARK VICTORY." Bette 
Davis, George Brent, Humphrey Bogart in melodrama about 
a young heiress who learns she has only months to live. Plus 
"Skinny the Moocher." Bio. Sci. Free, D. U. undergrads 
w/I.D.'s. $1.50. others. 

8:15 p.m. Black Student Alliance presents HOYT FULLER. Page 
Aud. 



Friday, September 21 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Botany Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Lucinda 
McDade. Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, of Duke University Prayers. York Room 
(Divinity School). 

3:30 p.m. Dept of Chemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. J. C. 
Bonaventura. Rm. 103 Gross Chem. Lab. Bldg. 

6:30 p.m. VOLLEYBALL: Duke Women vs. St. Augustine Col- 
lege. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m., midnight. Freewater Film: "THE HILLS 
HAVE EYES." Story of American family trapped in desert 
and terrorized by homicidal band. Bio. Sci. Aud. Free, D. U. 
undergrads w/I.D.'s. $1.50, others. 

Saturday, September 22 

Rosh Hashanah 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. N. C. Genealogical Society & Manuscripts 
Dept. Meeting. Page Aud. 

10:30 a.m. Freewater Children's Films: "RABBIT HOOD": "AD- 
VENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD." Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. 
$1.50. 

FOOTBALL: Duke vs. U. of S. C. (Away at Columbia, S.C.). 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "JAWS." Twenty feet of 
Great White Shark terrorize a New England seaside resort 
(and audiences) in this combination monster movie and Moby 
Dick. The message is "Don't go near the water." Robert 
Shaw portrays modern-day Capt. Ahab. Page Aud. $1.50. 

Sunday, September 23 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Divinity School). 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. Wm. H. Willimon, Assist. Prof, of 
Liturgy, D. U. Divinity School. The Service of Worship is 
broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults, $3.50; children under 12, V4 price. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5: 15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayer Service. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "JAWS." Page Aud. $1.50. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for S3. 50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of September 23rd- 
September 30th is Monday, September 17th, before 
3:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



ARTS IN DUKE CHAPEL ORGAN RECITAL 

The Arts in Duke Chapel will present John Mueller 
in an organ recital on Sunday, September 16th, at 7:00 
p.m. in the University Chapel. Dr. Mueller has been 
head of the Organ Department at Salem College since 
1957 and is a teacher of organ at the North Carolina 
School of the Arts. He holds degrees from Oberlin 
College, the University of Michigan, and Boston Uni- 
versity. A Fulbright Grantee in Frankfurt, Germany, 
where he studied with Helmut Walcha at the 
Hochschule fur Musik, Dr. Mueller has done addi- 
tional work with Anton Heiller, Luigi Tagliavini. and 
Marie-Claire Alain at the Summer Academy for Organ 
in Haarlem. The Netherlands. He has been guest fac- 
ulty member of the Longy School of Music, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, summer organist and choir- 
master at Harvard University, and North Carolina 
State Chairman of the American Guild of Organists. 

The program follows: 

Fantasia Chromatica Sweelinck 

Quinto Tiento Correa de Arauxo 

Batalha de 6. Ton Anonymous 

Suite on the First Tone Nivers 

Fantasia and Fugue in G Minor Bach 



Fantasia in F minor, K. 594 Mozart 

Piece Heroi'que Franck 

There is no admission charge to the recital. The 
public is invited. 



MUSEUM OF ART DOCENTS 

The Docents of the Duke University Museum of Art 
invite all interested individuals to join them for coffee 
and orientation at the Art Museum on Monday. Sep- 
tember 17th, at 9:30 a.m., for the beginning of their 
Fall docent course. Throughout the year, the trained 
docents take tours of school children and adults 
through the Museum on an appointment basis. A 
stimulating training course is available every Monday 
morning during the Winter session for those wishing to 
participate as docents. Further information may be 
obtained by calling Mrs. Robert Bouse, 383-7010. 



OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 
DANCE CLASS 

"Dance for the Health of It,"' a class in aerobic 
dancing, is being offered to the public on Monday. 
Wednesday, and Friday mornings, beginning Sep- 
tember 17th for eight weeks. A physical fitness pro- 
gram that exercises hearts and lungs while teaching a 
variety of social dance steps, the course is offered 
through the Duke University Office of Continuing 
Education and taught by Beverly McCraw. Partici- 
pants may register by sending a check for S36.00, pay- 
able to Duke University, to the Office of Continuing 
Education, 107 Bivins, Duke University, Durham, 
N.C. 27708. Further information may be obtained by 
calling 684-6259. 



COMPUTATION CENTER OFFERS 
FREE COURSES 

The Duke Computation Center is offering a series of 
courses on computer programming. The series starts 
with an Introduction to Computing course, which as- 
sumes no background in computer programming. 
These courses are free of charge and are open to all 
members of the Duke community. This includes stu- 
dents, faculty, staff, bi-weekly employees, and mem- 
bers of Duke-related organizations such as the V.A. 
Hospital. Family members of the above are also eligi- 
ble. Classes will meet Monday, Wednesday, and Fri- 
day from 4:00-5:00 p.m. Any course will be cancelled if 
fewer than five people register. To register or obtain 
more information, call Tana Kirzinger at 684-4217. 



Course 

CC10 Introduction 

CC30 Beginning FORTRAN 

CC31 Advanced FORTRAN 

CC20 Beginning PL I 

CC21 Advanced PL/I 

CC75 Beginning COBOL 



Dates Location Instructor 

Sept 17-21 Zener Auditorium Paris 

Sept 24-Oct 12 208 Language Bldg. Begeman 

Oct 15-Nov 2 208 Language Bldg. Paris 

Sept24-Octl2 Zener Auditorium Silver 

Oct 15-Nov 2 217 Language Bldg. Tuan 

Sept 24-Oct 12 21 1 Language Bldg. Stone 



CC76 Advanced COBOL Octl5-Nov2 211 Language Bldg. Grady 

CC52 SPSS Sept24-Oct5 231 Social Sciences Poss 

CC94 Beginning APL Nov 5-16 100 North Bldg. Grady 

CC% Advanced APL Nov 26-Dec 7 100 North Bldg. Butler 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday. September 17th, at 4: 15 p.m. in Room 1 1 1 of 
the Biological Sciences Building. Tom Cronin. De- 
partment of Zoology, Duke University, will speak on 
"Retention of Crab Larva in Estuaries."' Coffee and 
tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

DUKE LAW FORUM TALK 

The Duke Law Forum invites all members of the 
university community to an informal talk by Chief 
Justice William S. Richardson of the Hawaii Supreme 
Court on Tuesday, September 18 at 10:00 a.m. in the 
Brown Lounge of the Law School. The Chief Justice's 
talk will be followed by a question and answer period. 
Coffee and donuts will be served. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS AND 
EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Dr. James W. Hardin, Professor of Botany and 
Forest Resources, North Carolina State University, 
will present a seminar entitled "SEM-Systematics 
Using Foliar Features" on Tuesday, September 18th, 
at 12:30 p.m. in Room 130 Biological Sciences Build- 
ing. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Pharmacology, Duke University 
Medical Center, will sponsor a seminar, "Genetic 
Differences in Drug Metabolism Affecting Individual 
Risk for Drug Toxicity, Cancer, and Birth Defects," 
on Tuesday, September 18th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 147 
Nanaline H. Duke Building. Daniel Nebert, M.D., 
Chief, Developmental Pharmacology, NICHD, NIH, 
will be the speaker. Coffee will be served in the lobby 
at 3:45 p.m. 

YOGIC MEDITATION CLASSES 

A weekly series of free introductory classes, based 
upon the Ananda Marga (Path of Fulfillment) medita- 
tion system, will begin on Tuesday, September 18th, 
7:30 p.m. Classes will be held at the Friends Meeting 
House on Alexander Street (just north of Campus 
Drive). For pre-registration and more information, in- 
terested persons may call Jonathan Hollin, 383-4057. 

MIKE CROSS IN CONCERT 

The Duke University Union Special Events Com- 
mittee and the Major Attractions Committee will co- 
sponsor Mike Cross in concert on Tuesday, September 
18th, at 8:00 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Tickets, now on 
sale at Page Box Office, are priced at $6 for the general 
public and S5 for Duke undergraduate students with 
I.D.'s All tickets are General Admission. 



CAMPUS CLUB NEWCOMERS' COFFEE 

The Campus Club will sponsor a Newcomers' Cof- 
fee on Wednesday, September 19th, at 10:00 a.m. at 
President and Mrs. Sanford's home, 1508 Pinecrest 
Road. Members of the Duke University faculty and 
staff will introduce to newcomers the various oppor- 
tunities for activities and involvement available in the 
Duke and Durham communities and information about 
North Carolina. Details about the meeting are avail- 
able from Mrs. W. E. Yarger, tel. 489-6408. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 
ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Botany will sponsor an ecology 
seminar, with Lucinda McDade, graduate student in 
the department, on Friday, September 21st, at 12:30 
p.m.. in Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. Ms. 
McDade will speak on "The Impact of Nectar Robbing 
in Two Tropical Hummingbird Pollinated Plant 
Species." 



CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. J. C. Bonaventura from the Duke University 
Marine Laboratory will present a seminar entitled 
"Structure-Function and Assembly in Hemocyanins 
of Arthropods and Molluscs" on Friday, September 
21st, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 103 Gross Chemical Lab- 
oratory. Refreshments will be served in the Lobby at 
3:10 p.m. 



DEADLINES FOR 1979-1980 
SEASON TICKET SALES 

The deadline for buying season tickets for Broadway 
at Duke is 4:00 p.m., Friday, September 21st. Tickets 
for individual performances will go on sale at 9:00 
a.m., Wednesday, September 26th. 

The deadline for buying season tickets for the Duke 
Artists Series is Friday, September 28th. Individual 
performance tickets will go on sale at 9:00 a.m. on 
Monday, October 1st. Tickets are available at Page 
Box Office, 9:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m., Monday-Friday: 
Master Charge and Visa, 10:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m., tel. 
684-4059, 684-3227. 



OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 

A wide variety of short courses and conferences are 
offered to the public by the Duke University Office of 
Continuing Education. Included are courses in skill- 
building, arts and sciences, and personal development. 
A detailed brochure will be mailed upon request, sent 
to Duke University, Office of Continuing Education, 
107 Bivins. Durham, N. C. 27708: tel. 684-6259. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREES 

The final examination of Ms. Caroline Swartzforthe Ph.D. degree 
in Economics was held on August 16th. The subject of Ms. Swartz's 
dissertation was "Human Capital, Labor Force Participation, and 
the Extended Family in Urban Kenya." The committee conducting 
the examination consisted of Professors Dr. H. G. Lewis, presiding, 
Dr. E. W. Weintraub, Dr. G. Tauchen, and Dr. F. T. de Vyver. 



The final examination of Ms. Martha Farmer for the Ph.D. degree 
in Physiology was held on Tuesday, September 11th. The subject of 
Ms. Farmer's dissertation was "The Influence of Carbamino Carbon 
Dioxide on Vertebrate Hemoglobin Function." The committee con- 
ducting the examination consisted of Professors Joseph Bonaven- 
tura, presiding, John Gutknecht, Thomas McManus, John Salzano, 
Peter Lauf, and Boiling Sullivan. 



The final examination of Mr. Thomas W. Cronin for the Ph.D. 
degree in Zoology was held on Wednesday, September 12th. The 
subject of Mr. Cronin's dissertation was "Factors Contributing to 
the Retention of Larvae of the Crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii in the 
Newport River Estuary, North Carolina." The committee conduct- 
ing the examination consisted of Professors Richard B. Forward, Jr, 
presiding, John D. Costlow, Richard T. Barber, Stephen A. Wain- 
wright, and Richard B. Searles. 



The final examination of Ms. Amy Somers for the Ph.D. degree in 
Sociology was held on Wednesday, September 12th. The subject of 
Ms. Somer's dissertation was "Transition and Social-Structural 
Differentiation within the Urban System." The committee con- 
ducting the examination consisted of Professors Joel Smith, presid- 
ing. Edward Tiryakian, Kenneth Manton, George Myers, and David 
Davies. 






DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

calendar: 




eptember 23-30, 1979 



/olume 79 



Published September 21, 1979 



Number 4 



Sunday, September 23 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Divinity School). 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. Wm. H. Willimon, Assist. Prof, of 
Liturgy, D. U. Divinity School. The Service of Worship is 
broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults, $3.50; children under 12, Vi price. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayer. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "JAWS." Twenty feet of 
Great White Shark terrorize a New England seaside resort 
(and audiences) in this combination monster movie and Moby 
Dick. The message is "Don't go near the water." Robert 
Shaw portrays modern-day Capt. Ahab. Page Aud. $1.50. 

Monday, September 24 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 

4:00 p.m. Class on Reference Resources for Art/ Art History. Ref. 

Rm., E. Campus Lib. 
4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Monte Lloyd. Rm. 

Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
7:00 p.m. Class on Reference Resources for Arty Art History. Ref. 

Rm., E. Campus Lib. 

Tuesday, September 25 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics and Evolution Seminar. Speaker: 
Keith Clay. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: David Klein, 
Ph.D. Rm 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. D. U. Council on Aging and Human Development Semi- 
nar. Speaker: E. W. Busse, M.D. Rm. 1504 Gerontology 
Bldg. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (WOMEN DIRECTORS 
SERIES): "ALL SCREWED UP," Dir., Lina Wertmuller. A 
pessimistic comedy about work, class, and sex in industrial 
society. (Italian w/subtitles.) D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s, free; 
others, $1.50. 

Wednesday, September 26 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Education KDP Luncheon Symposium. 
Speaker: Dr. Ellis Page. Rm. 202, West Duke Bldg. (E. Cam- 
pus). 

7:00, 9:00 & 11:00 p.m. Film: "THE GRADUATE," sponsored by 
the Duke Youth Council of the A.D.A. Bio. Sci. Aud. $1.00. 

8:15 p.m. Round Table on Science and Public Affairs Lecture. 
Speaker: The Hon. Lucy Wilson Benson. Gross Chem. Lab. 
Aud. 

Thursday, September 27 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
3:45 p.m. Meeting of the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts 
and Sciences. Rm. 139 Social Sciences Bldg. 



5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. Memorial Chapel (Duke 
Chapel). 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (AMERICAN FILMS OF 1939 
SERIES): "NINOTCHKA." Russian agent played by Greta 
Garbo succumbs to champagne and romance when sent to 
Paris to check up on three errant comrades. Also, "Old 
Glory" with Porky Pig. D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s, free; 
others, $1.50. 

7:45 p.m. N. C. Society of the Archeological Institute of America 
Public Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Caroline Dexter. York Chapel 
(Divinity School). 

8:00 p.m. N. C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with JAIME 
LAREDO, Violinist. Page Aud. Adm. by Season Ticket, or 
Single Ticket (Available first concert only) $6 Gen. Public; $3 
Stu.,65 + . 

Friday, September 28 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 

12:00 noon. Women's Health Lunch Series. Rm. 226 Perkins Lib. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
12:30 p.m. Biochemistry/Genetics Seminar. Speaker: Arno L. 

Greenleaf. Rm. 147 N. H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Botany Seminar. Speaker: Juliana Mulroy. Rm. 
144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, of Duke University Prayers. York Rm. 

(Divinity School). 
3:30 p.m. Dept. of Chemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. R. A. 

Hegstrom. Rm. 103 Gross Chem. Lab. 
7:00 & 11:00 p.m. Freewater Film (FRIDAY NIGHT SERIES): 
"WOODSTOCK." Movie of the music and the happening. 
Oscar winner for Best Documentary. D. U. undergrads 
w/I.D.'s, free; others, $1.50. 

Saturday, September 29 

9:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. Wholistic Health Center Workshop. Engr. 

Bldg. Aud. (Fee) 
10.00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 

10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Durham Arts Council Annual Street Arts 
Celebration. Main St., Durham. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. "GREASE." John Travolta 
and Olivia Newton-John in happy spoof of 50' s fads and fan- 
tasies. Also, Stockard Channing. Page Aud. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. N. C. Chamber Players Concert. East Duke Music Rm. 
(E. Campus). Adm. by Season Ticket, or $4 Single. 

Sunday, September 30 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Divinity School). 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Mr. Robert T. Young, Minister to the 
University. The Service of Worship is broadcast over WDBS, 
107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults, $3.50; children, '/i price. Wine service available after 
1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00 p.m. Duke University Wind Symphony: GARDEN CON- 
CERT. Duke Gardens (Baldwin Aud., if rain). Free. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayer. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "GREASE." Page Aud. 
$1.50. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 

Deadline for the Calendar of September 30th- 
October 7th is Monday, September 24th, before 
3:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Copies of the new edition of Duke University Publi- 
cations, The Faculty of Arts and Sciences have been 
distributed to all full-time faculty of Trinity College 
and the School of Engineering. Other individuals who 
would like copies may pick them up at Room 212 Allen 
Building. The book lists faculty publications for the 
period January 1, 1973, to August 31, 1978. It should 
be noted that publications which appeared in print 
during the year are not included in this edition. 

ART REFERENCE RESOURCES CLASSES 

Two classes on reference resources for art and art 
history will be offered by Edith Hassold, Art Libra- 
rian, in the East Campus Library Reference Room at 
4:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. on Monday, September 24th. 
Additional information is available by calling 684-3244. 

D.U.U. CRAFTS CENTER CLASSES 

The D. U. Union Crafts Center classes beginning 
this week are: 

Pottery I, II Papermaking 

Silkscreen on Fabric Quilting 

Weaving Photography I, II, III 

Detailed information is available from the Crafts 
Center, tel. 684-6213, 3:00-6:00 p.m. 



Rm. 346 Perkins 
Rm. 421 Perkins 

Rm. 317 Perkins 
Rm. 128 Soc./Psy. 
Rm. 101 Union 

Rm. 317 Perkins 
Rm. 317 Perkins 
Rm. 421 Perkins 



OFFICE OF 
CONTINUING EDUCATION CLASSES 

Office of Continuing Education Classes beginning 
this week are: 

Mon., Sept. 24 SAT Study Group 

Thurs., Sept. 27 Returning Students: What Can You Do? 

Sat., Sept. 29 Community Wholistic Health Center Workshop 

Detailed information is available from the Office of 
Continuing Education, tel. 684-6259. 

HILLEL FOUNDATION 
JEWISH FREE UNIVERSITY 

Hillel Foundation will sponsor weekly courses, be- 
ginning Monday, September 24th. The courses are free 
to Hillel associates, $5 per 10- week course for non- 
affiliates. The schedule for the courses to be taught at 
Duke is as follows: 
Monday, Sept. 24 

7:30 p.m. Jewish Faith and Folk 
7:30 p.m. Hebrew Lit. & Translation 
Tuesday, Sept. 25 

7:00 p.m. 48 Ways to Wisdom 
7:00 p.m. Jewish Medical Ethics 
8:00 p.m. Israeli Folk Dancing 
Thursday, Sept. 27 

6:30 p.m. Beginning Hebrew 
7:30 p.m. Advanced Hebrew 
7:30 p.m. Lit. of the Holocaust 

In addition to the above courses, Topics in Israel 
Today, a discussion/lecture series, will be taught; the 
schedule will be announced. Further information 
about these courses is available from Linda Singer, tel. 
(CH) 942-4057. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, September 24th at 4: 15 p.m., in Room 1 1 1 of 
the Biological Sciences Building. Monte Lloyd, De- 
partment of Biology, University of Chicago, will speak 
on "Patchy Distributions in Periodical Cicadas." 

Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS AND 
EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Keith Clay, Graduate Student, Department of 
Botany, will present a seminar entitled "The Vegeta- 
tion of the Southeastern Granite Outcrops" on Tues- 
day, September 25th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 130 
Biological Sciences Building. 

D. U. COUNCIL ON AGING AND 
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

The D. U. Council on Aging and Human Develop- 
ment will sponsor a seminar on Tuesday, September 
25th, at 4:00 p.m. Dr. Ewald W. Busse, J. P. Gibbons 
Professor of Psychiatry and Dean of Medical and Al- 
lied Health Education, DUMC, will speak on "The 
Elderly of China." The seminar will be held in Room 
1504, Gerontology Building (DUMC). 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Pharmacology (DUMC) will 
sponsor a seminar on Tuesday, September 25th, with 
Dr. David Klein, Chief, Section on Neuro- 
endocrinology, NICHD, NIH. Dr. Klein's topic will 
be "Neuronal Control of Gene Expression." The 
seminar will be held at 4:00 p.m. in Room 147, 
Nanaline H. Duke Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
KDP LUNCHEON SYMPOSIUM 

The Department of Education and Kappa Delta Pi 
will sponsor a symposium on Wednesday, September 
26th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 202, West Duke Building 
(East Campus). Dr. Ellis Page, Professor of Educa- 
tion, Duke University, will speak on "Educational 
Decision Making." Additional information is available 
by calling 684-3924. 

ROUND TABLE ON SCIENCE AND 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURE 

The Honorable Lucy Wilson Benson, Under Sec- 
retary of State for Security Assistance, Science and 
Technology, will speak on "Science and Technology 
in Developing Countries" on Wednesday, September 
26th, at 8:15 p.m. in the Gross Chemical Laboratory 
Auditorium. Chancellor A. Kenneth Pye will preside. 
The lecture is sponsored by the Round Table on Sci- 
ence and Public Affairs and the public is invited to 
attend. 

CALLED MEETING 

UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL OF 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 

There will be a called meeting of the Undergraduate 
Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences on Thursday, 
September 27th, at 3:45 p.m. in Room 139, Social Sci- 
ences Building. 

N. C. SOCIETY OF AIA PUBLIC LECTURE 

The North Carolina Society of the Archaeological 
Institute of America announces a public lecture to 
commemorate the 1900th year of the burial of Roman 
Pompeii by the volcano Vesuvius. Professor Caroline 
Dexter, Georgetown University, will speak on 
"Women in Pompeii," on September 27th, at 7:45 
p.m. in York Chapel (Divinity School, West Campus). 

PSYCHICAL RESEARCH FOUNDATION 
ANNOUNCES FALL COURSES 

The Psychical Research Foundation announces the 
weekly evening courses for its Fall 1979 education 
program. The courses, instructors, and times are: 

Understanding Parapsychology — Arthur Berger. J.D. 
(8 wks.) Thursdays, beginning Sept. 27 7:00-9:00 p.m. 

Healing: Symbol and Existence — Ralph G. Locke, Ph.D. 
(8 wks.) Fridays, beginning September 28 7:00-9:00 p.m. 

Advanced Independent Study— PRF Faculty. Time TBA. 



Tuition for the courses is $40. per course. Courses 
will be given at the David Wayne Hooks Memorial 
Library, 2013 Erwin Road. Registration will be taken 
at the PRF Office, 2015 Erwin Road; tel. 286-0714. 

PROGRAM ANNOUNCED FOR 
N. C. SYMPHONY CONCERT IN DURHAM 

The Barber Concerto for Violin and Orchestra per- 
formed by violinist Jaime Laredo will highlight the 
North Carolina Symphony concert in Durham on 
September 27th, Guest Conductor Lawrence Smith 
recently announced. 

The concert will be held in Page Auditorium at Duke 
University at 8:00 p.m. 

The remainder of the concert will be Mendelssohn's 
Overture to "Ruy Bias" and the Dvorak Symphony 
No. 6 in D Major. 

Violinist Jaime Laredo earned international recog- 
nition in 1959 when he won the Queen Elisabeth of 
Belgium Competition. He has since appeared with 
virtually every major orchestra in the United States, 
Canada, Europe and Central and South America. 

Single tickets are $3 for students, those 65 and over, 
and Symphony Society members; others, $6. Sub- 
scriptions for the four-concert series are available at $9 
for students and those 65 and over;, others, $15. In- 
formation is available from Page Box Office, 684-4059. 

WOMEN'S HEALTH LUNCH SERIES 

On Friday, September 28th, at 12:00 noon, a film 
and discussion, "Abortion: It Happens to Us," will be 
held in Room 226 Perkins Library. The film and dis- 
cussion are the first in a series of "brown bag" lunch 
women's health programs. 

BIOCHEMISTRY-UNIVERSITY PROGRAM 
IN GENETICS SEMINAR 

The Department of Biochemistry and the University 
Program in Genetics will sponsor a seminar with Arno 
L. Greenleaf, speaker, Duke University Department 
of Biochemistry, on Friday, September 28th, at 12:30 
p.m. in Room 147, Nanaline H. Duke Building. Dr. 
Arno's topic will be "An Altered DNA-dependent 
RNA Polymerase II from an Alpha- Amanitin-resistant 
Drosophila melanogaster." Coffee will be served in 
the lobby at 12:15 p.m. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY SEMINAR 

The Department of Botany will hold a seminar on 
Friday, September 28th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 144 
Biological Sciences Building. Juliana Mulroy, graduate 
student in the Department of Botany, Duke Univer- 
sity, will speak on "Contributions to the Ecology and 
Biogeography of the Saxifraga cespitosa Complex in 
the Americas." 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. R. A. Hegstrom from Wake Forest University 
will present a seminar entitled "Some Theoretical As- 



pects of Parity Violating Weak Interactions in Atoms 
and Molecules" on Friday, September 28th, at 3:30 
p.m. in Room 103, Gross Chemical Laboratory. Re- 
freshments will be served in the Lobby at 3:10 p.m. 

DURHAM ARTS COUNCIL 
ANNUAL STREET ARTS CELEBRATION 

The Durham Arts Council, observing its Twenty- 
Fifth Anniversary, will sponsor the sixth annual Street 
Arts Celebration on Saturday, September 29th, from 
10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. More than 250 artists and 
craftsmen will display their work on Durham's Main 
Street. 

A new feature this year will be an International 
Street, with displays, exhibits, foods, and performing 
arts. Cash prizes will be awarded for contest winners 
in balloon launching, energy conservation, photog- 
raphy, and cake decorating. The Children's Area will 
feature a balloon sculpture, face painting, kite making 
and flying, instant replay theatre, wood sculpture, and 
an exhibition of works by young artists. Farmers and 
gardeners will display and sell their produce and plants 
in a special Farmers' Market section. The public li- 
brary will sponsor a book sale. Persons interested in 
volunteering to help with the celebration are asked to 
call Cynthia Watts, Durham Arts Council, 120 Morris 
Street; tel. 682-5519. 

NORTH CAROLINA 
CHAMBER PLAYERS CONCERT 

The North Carolina Chamber Players announce the 
first concert in their 1979-80 Durham series on Sep- 
tember 29th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music 
Room, E. Campus. This Gala Opening Performance 
will feature the music of Mozart. Special features will 
be: Mozart's Piano Quintet, String Duo, and String 
Quintet. The performers will be: Michael Ma, Mike 
Levin, Christine Martin, Phyllis Sandgren, Susan 
Gardner, Michael Schultz, Don Martin, George 
Mitchell, and Victor Benedict of the North Carolina 
Chamber Players. Special guest artist will be Loren 
Withers, Piano. Tickets for the performance are avail- 
able by subscription or for $4.00 at Page Box Office, 
the Durham Arts Council, or at the door. This perfor- 
mance will be the culmination of day-long activities in 
association with the Durham Street Arts Celebration. 

OCE: WHOLISTIC CENTER WORKSHOP 

A workshop conducted by the Community Wholistic 
Health Center will be held on Saturday, September 
29th, in the Engineering Building. The all-day work- 
shop includes small group sessions designed to help 
people realize a maximum level of well-being through 
education, prevention, and self-care. Additionally, a 
catered lunch will demonstrate the use and presenta- 
tion of nutritious food. 

Registration details may be obtained from the Duke 
University Office of Continuing Education, 684-6259. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 
WIND SYMPHONY GARDEN CONCERT 

The Duke University Wind Symphony will open its 
1979-80 season with a garden concert on Sunday, 
September 30th, at 3:00 p.m. in the Sarah P. Duke 
Gardens (Baldwin Auditorium, if rain). The concert 
program will range from the "Chorale and Fugue" of 
Buxtehude and the "Overture" of the Tsar's Bride by 
Rimsky-Korsakov to marches by Dvorak and Sousa as 
well as the musical, "Fiddler on the Roof," featuring 
John Hanks, tenor, as vocalist. The concert, spon- 
sored by the Department of Music, is free to the pub- 
lic. 

THE ERASMUS CLUB AND THE DEPARTMENT 

OF MUSIC PRESENT A PUBLIC LECTURE 

BY DR. URSULA KIRKENDALE 

The first meeting of the Erasmus Club for the 
academic year 1979-80 will be held on Monday, Oc- 
tober 1, at 4:15 p.m. in 226 Perkins Library. Ursula 
Kirkendales paper "The Source and Model of Bach's 
Musical Offering: the Institutio Oratorio of Quintil- 
lian" will be read by Dr. Warren Kirkendale of the 
Department of Music. Everyone is invited to attend 
this lecture and the informal reception that will follow. 

Ursula Kirkendale studied at the Universities of 
Munich, Vienna, and Bonn (Ph.D. summa cum 
laude), taught at USC, UCSB, Duke, and was visiting 
associate professor at Columbia University and fellow 
of the American Council of Learned Societies in 
Rome. After publication of her book on Antonio Cal- 
dara she was elected member of the Gesellschaft zur 
Herausgabe von Denkmalern der Tonkunst in Oster- 
reich. She is also the author of articles in Acta 
Musicologica, the Journal of the American 
Musicological Society, Chigiana, the Dizionario 
Biografico degli Italiani, Die Musik in Geschichte und 
Gegenwart, Riemann Musik-Lexikon, etc. Her article 
"The Ruspoli Documents on Handel," reconstructing 
minutely Handel's hitherto obscure years in Italy, re- 
ceived the Alfred Einstein Award of the American 
Musicological Society. 

The Musical Offering, presented by Bach to King 
Frederick the Great a few years before his death, has 
been the most problematic work of a great composer, 
largely because it was published in loose leaves which 
were never bound together. Thus the sequence of its 
thirteen component movements has been the object of 
boundless speculation — most of it subjective and none 
of it convincing, with no two authors in agreement. 
Ursula Kirkendale has now proven that Bach modelled 
not only the sequence of movements, but also every 
stylistic detail after the great handbook of classical 
rhetoric, Quintillian's 7«sWMf/o Oratorio, making each 
movement correspond to a section of the forensic 
speech. Scholars who have read the article in manu- 
script or heard the lecture presented earlier this year in 
London, Berlin, Frankfurt, and Vienna, have hailed 
the discovery as "absolutely convincing" (Eva Badura 
Skoda), "pathbreaking" (Gerhard Herz), "an im- 



mense step forward, an unprecedented breakthrough" 
(Edward Lowinsky). 

Future meetings of the Erasmus Club will be held on 
the first Monday of each month during the school year 
at 4:15 p.m. in 226 Perkins Library. 

LECTURE BY FRENCH HISTORIAN 

The distinguished French historian, Professor 
Jean-Claude Margolin of the University of Tours, will 
lecture on "Charles de Bovelles (1479-1553) according 
to his Correspondence" on Thursday, October 4th, at 
8 p.m. in the York Chapel (Gray Building). Professor 
Margolin is best known in this country for his impor- 
tant work on Eramus and French humanism. The lec- 
ture is sponsored by the Duke University Committee 
on Medieval and Renaissance Studies and is open to 
the public. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. James H. Quinlan for the Ph.D. 
degree in English was held on Monday, September 17th. The subject 



of Mr. Quinlan's dissertation was "Fancy-Blest: William Collins' 
Short-Lived Religion of Imagination.*' The committee conducting 
the examination consisted of Professors Oliver Ferguson, presiding; 
Wallace Jackson, Robert Gleckner, Gerald Monsman, and Dale 
Randall. 

The final examination of Mr. Paul Dennis Norman for the Ph.D. 
degree in Mathematics was held on Tuesday, September 18th. The 
subject of Mr. Norman's dissertation was "A Monotome Method for 
a System of Nonlinear Parabolic Differential Equations.'' The com- 
mittee conducting the examination consisted of Professors Jagdish 
Chandra, presiding; William K. Allard, Morris Weisfeld, Robert 
Jackson, and Michael C. Reed. 

The final examination of Ms. Judith Ann Graham for the Ph.D. 
degree in Physiology was held on Tuesday, September 18th. The 
subject of Ms. Graham's dissertation was "Alteration of Hepatic 
Xenobiotic Metabolism by Ozone.'' The committee conducting the 
examination consisted of Professors Daniel Menzel, presiding, 
M. B. Abou-Donia, John V. Salzano, D. E. Gardner, and Eugene D. 
Day. 



The final examination of Mr. Kevin Joseph Edgar for the Ph.D. 
degree in Chemistry was held on Thursday, September 19th. The 
subject of Mr. Edgar's dissertation was "Synthetic Applications of 
Thermolabile Arylrithium Reagents."' The committee conducting the 
examination consisted of Professors Charles K. Bradsher, presiding; 
Steven Baldwin. Daniel Sternbach, Pelham Wilder, and Daniel 
Menzel. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham. North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



calendar: 




Sept. 30-Oct. 7, 1979 



blume 79 



Published September 28, 1979 



Number 5 



Sunday, September 30 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Divinity School). 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Mr. Robert T. Young, Minister to the 
University. The Service of Worship is broadcast over WDBS, 
107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults, $3.50; children, '/i price. Wine service available after 
1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00 p.m. D. U. Wind Symphony: GARDEN CONCERT. Duke 
Gardens (Baldwin Aud., if rain). Free. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayers. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: -GREASE." John 
Travolta, Olivia Newton-John, and Stockard Channing in 
happy spoof of 50's fads and fantasies. Page Aud. $1.50. 

Monday, October 1 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:30 p.m. Dept. of Chemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Frank 
Hauser. Rm. 103 Gross Chem. Lab. 

4:00 p.m. Depts. of Botany & Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Ditter 
von Wettstein. Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

4:15 p.m. Erasmus Club/Dept. of Music Lecture. Speaker: Warren 
Kirkendale. Rm. 226 Perkins Lib. 

7:00. 9:00 & 11:00 p.m. Sigma Nu Movie: "PSYCHO." Bio. Sci. 
Aud. $1.25. 

8:00 p.m. Dept. of Philosophy Colloquium. Speaker: Prof. Benja- 
min F. Ward, Jr. Rm. 204 W. D. Bldg. 

Tuesday, October 2 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
12:30 p.m. University Program in Genetics Seminar. Speaker: Dit- 
ter von Wettstein. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics & Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Mel- 
vin Turner. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. FIELD HOCKEY. D. U. Women vs. Averett JV. 

4:00 p.m. D. U. Council on Aging & Human Development Semi- 
nar. Speaker: Dr. Marc E. Weksler. Rm. 1504 Gerontology 
Bldg. 

7:00 p.m. Duke Faculty Committee on Alternatives to Nuclear 
Power Seminar. Speakers: Jack Blackburn and Roy Wein- 
traub. Rm. 139 Soc. Sci. Bldg. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (WOMEN DIRECTORS 
SERIES): "BROTHER CARL." Two women, a Swedish re- 
sort, a mad ballet dancer, and Brother Carl are the central 
characters in this enigmatic mixture of relationships directed 
by Susan Sontag. Bio. Sci. Aud. Free, D. U. undergrads 
w/I.D.'s; $1.50, others. 

8:00 p.m. Mangum Photography Memorial Lecture. Speaker: Bar- 
bara Morgan. Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. 

8:00 p.m. Dept. of German Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Wolfgang 
Leppmann. Rm. 226 Perkins Lib. 

Wednesday, October 3 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
1:00 p.m. Dept. of Political Science Colloquium. Speaker: James 
David Barber. Rm. 307 Perkins Lib. 



6:30 p.m. VOLLEYBALL: D. U. Women vs. UNC-Asheville. 
7:00, 9:00 & 11:00 p.m.; 1:00 a.m. D. U. Democrats Movie: 

"HELP." Bio. Sci. Aud. $1. 
8:00 p.m. A.D.A. Speaker: Patsy Mink. Rm. 203 E. D. Bldg. 

Thursday, October 4 

Oct. 4-31: JOE LINUS, CoUages. W. Campus Gallery (104 Flow- 
ers). 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. Memorial Chapel (D. U. 
Chapel). 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (AMERICAN FILMS OF 1939 
SERIES): "DESTRY RIDES AGAIN." Western with James 
Stewart as the peaceable marshal and Marlene Dietrich as the 
barroom belle. Romance and fun. Also, "Pest from the 
West" with Buster Keaton. Bio. Sci. Aud. Free, D. U. un- 
dergrads w/I.D.'s; $1.50, others. 

8:00 p.m. D. U. Committee on Medieval and Renaissance Studies 
Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Jean-Claude Margolin. York Chapel 
(Divinity School). 

8:30 p.m. D. U. U. BROADWAY AT DUKE: ESTELLE PAR- 
SONS in "MISS MARGARIDAS WAY." Page Aud. $8, $7, 
&$6. 

Friday, October 5 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:00 noon. Women's Health Lecture and Discussion. "Vaginal 

Changes in Health and Illness." Rm. 226 Perkins Lib. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Kenneth 

M. Yamada. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Botany Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: James 
McGraw. Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, of D. U. Prayers. York Rm. (Divinity 

School). 
3:00 p.m. Institute of Pol. Sci. & Pub. Affairs Lecture/Duke U. 
Colloquia on Comparative Policymaking Lecture. Speaker: 
The Hon. Wm. Plowden. Rm. 204 Perkins Lib. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.; midnight. Freewater Film (FRIDAY NIGHT 
SERIES): "MOVIE, MOVIE." Affectionate, humorous re- 
prise of Hollywood films of the 1930's and '40's. Stars Geo. 
C. Scott, Red Buttons, Trish Van Devere. Bio. Sci. Aud. 
Free, D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s; $1.50, others. 
8:00 p.m. D. U. U. Major Speakers Committee presents DICK 
CAVETT. Page Aud. Free, D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s; $1.50 
Gen. Pub. 

Saturday, October 6 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. American Musicological Society (Southeast- 
em Chapter) Meeting. Rehearsal Hall, M.D. Biddle Music 
Bldg. 
10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
10:00 a.m. FIELD HOCKEY: D. U. Women vs. U. of Richmond. 
10:30 a.m. Freewater Children's Films Series: "YELLOW SUB- 
MARINE"; "The Shepherd." Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. 
$1.50. 
12:30 p.m. Duke Faculty Committee on Alternatives to Nuclear 
Power Trip to Shearon-Harris Nuclear Plant. Leave from 
W. D. Bldg. 
2:00 p.m. SOCCER: Duke vs. Virginia. 
5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Divinity School). 



7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: THE GREAT TRAIN 
ROBBERY." Elaborate Victorian robbery scheme with 
London setting. Fun-filled suspense and surprise ending with 
Sean Connery, Donald Sutherland, and Lesley- Anne Down 
(formerly of "Upstairs, Downstairs"). Page Aud. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music. CIOMPI QUARTET. E. D. Music Rm. 
Free. 

Sunday, October 7 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Divinity School). 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. C. Eric Lincoln, Prof, of Religion. 
Dept. of Religion. Duke University. The Service of Worship 
is broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults, $3.50; children, Vi price. Wine service available after 
1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayers. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "THE GREAT TRAIN 
ROBBERY.'Page Aud. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. D. U. String School: VIOLIN & PIANO SONATA RE- 
CITAL with HJORDIS TOURIAN & FRANCES EVANS. 
E. D. Music Rm. Free. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 
WIND SYMPHONY GARDEN CONCERT 

The Duke University Wind Symphony will open its 
1979-80 season with a garden concert on Sunday, 
September 30th, at 3:00 p.m. in the Sarah P. Duke 
Gardens (Baldwin Auditorium, if rain). The concert 
program will range from the "Chorale and Fugue" of 
Buxtehude and the "Overture" of the Tsar's Bride by 
Rimsky-Korsakov to marches by Dvorak and Sousa as 
well as the musical, "Fiddler on the Roof," featuring 
John Hanks, tenor, as vocalist. The concert, spon- 
sored by the Department of Music, is free to the pub- 
he. 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. Frank Hauser from Oregon Graduate Center will 
present a seminar entitled "Studies on the Synthesis of 
Anthracyclines" on Monday, October 1st, at 3:30 p.m. 
in Room 103 Gross Chemical Laboratory. Refresh- 
ments will be served in the Lobby at 3:10 p.m. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of October 7th-l4th is 
Monday, October 2nd, before 3:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



THE ERASMUS CLUB AND THE DEPARTMENT 

OF MUSIC PRESENT A PUBLIC LECTURE 

BY DR. URSULA KIRKENDALE 

The first meeting of the Erasmus Club for the 
academic year 1979-80 will be held on Monday, Oc- 
tober 1, at 4:15 p.m. in 226 Perkins Library. Ursula 
Kirkendale's paper "The Source and Model of Bach's 
Musical Offering: the Institutio Oratorio of Quin- 
tilian" will be read by Dr. Warren Kirkendale of the 
Department of Music. Everyone is invited to attend 
this lecture and the informal reception that will follow. 

Ursula Kirkendale studied at the Universities of 
Munich, Vienna, and Bonn (Ph.D. summa cum 
laude), taught at USC, UCSB, Duke, and was visiting 
associate professor at Columbia University and fellow 
of the American Council of Learned Societies in 
Rome. After publication of her book on Antonio Cal- 
dara she was elected member of the Gesellschaft zur 
Herausgabe von Denkmalern der Tonkunst in Oster- 
reich. She is also the author of articles in Acta 
Musicologica, the Journal of the American 
Musicological Society. Chigiana, the Dizionario 
Biografico degli Italiani, Die Musik in Geschichte und 
Gegenwart, Riemann Musik-Lexikon, etc. Her article 
"The Ruspoli Documents on Handel," reconstructing 
minutely Handel's hitherto obscure years in Italy, re- 
ceived the Alfred Einstein Award of the American 
Musicological Society. 

The Musical Offering, presented by Bach to King 
Frederick the Great a few years before his death, has 
been the most problematic work of a great composer, 
largely because it was published in loose leaves which 
were never bound together. Thus the sequence of its 
thirteen component movements has been the object of 
boundless speculation — most of it subjective and none 
of it convincing, with no two authors in agreement. 
Ursula Kirkendale has now proven that Bach modelled 
not only the sequence of movements, but also every 



stylistic detail after the great handbook of classical 
rhetoric. Quintilian's Institutio Oratorio, making each 
movement correspond to a section of the forensic 
speech. Scholars who have read the article in manu- 
script or heard the lecture presented earlier this year in 
London, Berlin, Frankfurt, and Vienna, have hailed 
the discovery as "absolutely convincing" (Eva Badura 
Skoda), "pathbreaking" (Gerhard Herz), "an im- 
mense step forward, an unprecedented breakthrough" 
(Edward Lowinsky). 

Future meetings of the Erasmus Club will be held on 
the first Monday of each month during the school year 
at 4:15 p.m. in 226 Perkins Library. 

PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT COLLOQUIUM 

The Department of Philosophy will present Profes- 
sor Benjamin F. Ward, Jr. of Yale University, who will 
deliver a paper entitled "The Logic of Romanticism" 
on Monday, October 1st, at 8:00 p.m. in 204 West 
Duke Building. 

GERMAN DEPARTMENT LECTURE 

At 8 p.m. on Monday October 1st, Professor 
Wolfgang Leppmann will give a lecture entitled: 
"Writing for the Literary Page: The Experiences of a 
Regular Contributor to Die Zeit and Frankfurter 
Allgemaine Zeitung." Professor Leppmann has been 
chairman of the German Department at the University 
of Oregon and is currently Visiting Professor at the 
University of Virginia. He maintains an active career 
as a literary reviewer for leading German periodicals 
and has published major books on Pompeii, on 
Winckelmann, and on Goethe's image in German cul- 
ture and society. There will be a reception immediately 
following the lecture in 226 Perkins Library, sponsored 
by Delta Phi Alpha. Everyone is most welcome. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS 
AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Melvin Turner, graduate student, Department of 
Botany, will present a seminar entitled "The Contro- 
versial Morphology of the Shoot in the Fern Hypolepis 
Resolved" on Tuesday, October 2nd, at 12:30 p.m. in 
Room 130 Biological Sciences Building. 

UNIVERSITY PROGRAM 
IN GENETICS SEMINAR 

The University Program in Genetics will hold a 
seminar on Tuesday, October 2nd, in Room 147 
Nanaline H. Duke Building at 12:30 p.m. Ditter von 
Wettstein, Department of Physiology, Carlsberg Lab- 
oratory, Copenhagen, Denmark, will speak on 
"Biosynthesis of Reserve Proteins in Barley and 
Cloning of the Hordein Gene." 

D. U. COUNCIL ON THE AGING AND 
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

The Duke University Council on Aging and Human 
Development will sponsor a seminar on Tuesday, Oc- 



tober 2nd, at 4:00 p.m.. Room 1504 Gerontology 
Building, DUMC. The speaker will be Marc E. Weks- 
ler, M.D., Wright Professor of Medicine; Director, Di- 
vision of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of 
Medicine, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, New York, New York. Dr. Weksler's topic 
will be "Senescence of the Immune Response: Cellu- 
lar Basis and Clinical Significance." 

DFCANP ENERGY SEMINAR 
ECONOMICS OF NUCLEAR POWER 

The Duke Faculty Committee on Alternatives to 
Nuclear Power will feature a discussion of "The 
Economics of Nuclear Power" by D. U. economists 
Jack Blackburn and Roy Weintraub. The meeting at 
7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 2nd, in Rm. 139 Social 
Sciences Bldg., is open to all concerned members of 
the Duke Community. Refreshments will be served. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
DISCO DANCE CLASS 

The Physical Education Department of Duke Uni- 
versity will offer a non-credit Disco Dance Class, be- 
ginning Tuesday, October 2nd. at 8:15 p.m. Contem- 
porary styling, elements of dance, and technique in 
leading and following will be covered. This course is 
designed for everyone who wants to acquire the fun- 
damentals of partner dancing. The six-week course 
will be taught in Southgate Dormitory gymnasium and 
will cost $15.00 per person. More information is avail- 
able by calling 489-3887. 

DEPARTMENT OF 
POLITICAL SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM 

The Department of Political Science will sponsor a 
colloquium on Wednesday, October 3rd, at 1:00 p.m. 
in Room 307 Perkins Library. James David Barber, 
Duke University, will speak on "The Pulse of Poli- 
tics." 

PRESIDENT OF AMERICANS FOR 
DEMOCRATIC ACTION TO SPEAK 

Patsy Mink, national president of the Americans for 
Democratic Action, former U. S. Representative 
(D. -Hawaii) and former Assistant Secretary of State. 
will speak on the Draft-Kennedy-for-President cam- 
paign on Wednesday, October 3rd, at 8:00 p.m. in 
Room 203 East Duke Building (East Campus). 

LECTURE BY FRENCH HISTORIAN 

The distinguished French historian. Professor 
Jean-Claude Margolin of the University of Tours, will 
lecture on "Charles de Bovelles (1479-1553) according 
to his Correspondence" on Thursday, October 4th, at 
8 p.m. in the York Chapel (Gray Building). Professor 
Margolin is best known in this country for his impor- 
tant work on Eramus and French humanism. The lec- 
ture is sponsored by the Duke University Committee 
on Medieval and Renaissance Studies and is open to 
the public. 



BROADWAY AT DUKE 
MISS MAGARIDA'S WAY 

On Thursday, October 4th, the Duke University 
Union "Broadway at Duke" Series will open with 
Estelle Parsons in Miss Margarida' s Way. Miss Par- 
sons received a Tony Award for her performance in 
the title role, playing a paranoid and frustrated school 
teacher, who releases her venom on her eighth-grade 
class, played by the audience. She has guest-starred at 
leading repertory theatres across the country and 
played Miss Margarida in 55 cities abroad. In addition 
to her Tony Award, she has received several awards 
for her acting achievements. Reserved seat tickets for 
the performance in Page Auditorium at 8:30 p.m. are 
priced at $8, $7, and $6, with a $2.00 discount for Duke 
undergraduates showing I.D.'s. (Page Box Office, 
684-4059; 684-3227.) 

WOMEN'S HEALTH LECTURE 
DISCUSSION 

The Women's Health Program will sponsor a 
lunch-time lecture and discussion on Friday, October 
5th, from 12:00 noon until 1:00 p.m. in Room 226 Per- 
kins Library. The topic will be "Vaginal Changes in 
Health and Illness." 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

On Friday, October 5th, at 12:30 p.m., the Botany 
Department will sponsor a Plant Ecology seminar. 
James McGraw, graduate student in the department, 
will speak on "A Rose is a Rose is a Rose. Or is It? 
Preliminary Studies on Life-History Variation in 
Dryas octopetaia (Rosaceae), an Artie-Alpine Peren- 
nial." The seminar will be held in Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

On Friday, October 5th, the Department of 
Biochemistry will sponsor a seminar with Kenneth M. 
Yamada, M.D., Ph.D., Laboratory of Molecular Biol- 
ogy, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, 
Maryland. Dr. Yamada's topic will be "Cell Surface 
Protein (Fibronectin) and Cell Interactions." Coffee 
will be served in the lobby at 12:15 p.m. The seminar 
will be held in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building at 
12:30 p.m. 

D. U. COLLOQUIA ON COMPARATIVE 
POLICYMAKING LECTURE 

The Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs 
and the Duke University Colloquia on Comparative 
Policymaking will sponsor a lecture on Friday, Oc- 
tober 5th, in Room 204 Perkins Library at 3:00 p.m. 
The Honorable William Plowden, Director-General, 
Royal Institute of Public Administration, London, and 
former director of the Central Policy Review Staff in 
the Prime Minister's office (analogous to the Brook- 
ings Institution), will speak on "Attempts by the Cur- 
rent British Administration to Reverse Post-War 
Trends in Government Intervention." Dr. Robert D. 



Behn, Associate Professor of Public Policy Studies, 
will serve as moderator. The public is invited. 

D. U. MAJOR SPEAKERS' COMMITTEE 
PRESENTS DICK CAVETT 

The Duke University Union will present television 
personality Dick Cavett on Friday, October 5th, at 
8:00 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Tickets, priced at $1.50 
for the General Public, will be available at Page Box 
Office, starting October 2nd. Duke undergraduates 
will be admitted free by showing their semester en- 
rollment card. 

TOUR OF SHEARON-HARRIS 
NUCLEAR POWER PLANT 

The Duke Faculty Committee on Alternatives to 
Nuclear Power has organized a tour of the Shearon- 
Harris Nuclear Power Plant for Saturday, October 6th. 
All members of the Duke Community concerned about 
nuclear power and the energy crisis are invited to join 
this trip and bring friends and family. Transportation 
will leave from West Duke Building on East Campus at 
12:30 p.m. and return by 5:00 p.m. Following the tour 
DFCANP will hold a wine and cheese party for tour 
participants near the gazebo on the East Campus lawn. 
The tour fee is $3.00 for adults and $2.00 for children. 
Charles Berquist, 102 West Duke Building, 684-3626, 
will take reservations or furnish further details. 

CIOMPI QUARTET CONCERT 

The Ciompi Quartet of Duke University will offer its 
first concert of the 1979-80 season on Saturday, Oc- 
tober 6th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. 
The group includes Giorgio Ciompi, violinist and 
founder of the quartet; Claudia Erdberg, violinist; 
George Taylor, violist, and Fred Raimi, cellist. 

George Taylor, the newest addition to the Quartet, 
is from New York City. He began his musical studies 
on the violin and later embraced the viola as his chief 
means of musical expression. His principle teachers 
include Burton Kaplan, Raphaiel Bronstein, and 
Manie Laredo, and he has studied chamber music with 
Joseph Gingold, Lillian Fuchs, Artur Balsam, and 
members of the Budapest and Guanari Quartets. His 
musical activities range from performance in the Met- 
ropolitan Opera Orchestra and The Symphony of the 
New World to studio recordings and concerts with the 
Rainier Quartet. At the Downeast Chamber Center in 
Castine, Maine, he has performed with such artists as 
the Lyric Arts Trio, Joseph Seiger, and Erick Fried- 
man. In April, 1979, George Taylor played a highly 
successful New York debut recital under the auspices 
of the New York City Housing Authority Symphony 
Orchestra. 

The Quartet will present a program which includes 
Mozart's Quartet in F, K. 590; Beethoven's Quartet in 
f minor, Op. 95 ("Serioso"); and Robert Schumann's 
Quartet in a minor, Op. 41 #1. 

The program, sponsored by the Duke University 
Department of Music, is open to the public without 
charge of admission. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY STRING SCHOOL 
RECITAL 

The Duke University String School will present "A 
Violin and Piano Sonata Recital," Hjordis Tourian, 
violinist, and Frances Evans, pianist on Sunday, Oc- 
tober 7th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. 
The program follows: 

Sonata XI, Op. 6 Tomaso Albinoni 

Grave Adagio (1671-1750) 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Allegro 
Sonate in C (1939) Paul Hindemith 

Lebhaft (1895-1963) 

Langsam — Lebhaft — Langsam, wie zuerst 

Fuge. Ruhig bewegt 
Sonata in G major. Op. 96 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Allegro moderato ( 1 770- 1 827 ) 

Adagio expressivo 

Scherzo — Allegro 

Poco allegretto — Adagio — Allegro 

The public is invited. Admission is free. 

PHI BETA KAPPA MEETING 

PHI BETA KAPPA, Duke Chapter, will meet 4 
p.m., October 9th in 226 Perkins Library. All members 
are urged to attend. Newcomers to the Duke commu- 
nity who are members of Phi Beta Kappa may affiliate 
with the Duke Chapter by sending name, year and 
place of election, and local address to the Secretary, 
401 Perkins Library, or Box 4795 Duke Station, Dur- 
ham, N. C. 27706. 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Ms. Lockie Jayne McGehee for the 
Ph.D. degree in Psychology was held on Friday, September 28th. 
The subject of Ms. McGehee's dissertation was "The Premature 
Infant's Interactive Capacity: Its Significance for the Mother-Infant 
Dyad. " The committee conducting the examination consisted of 
Professors Carol Eckerman, presiding, John Coie, Carl Erickson. 
Martin Lakin. and Steven Gross. 

The final examination of Ms. Donna Dodd Kostyu for the Ph.D. 
degree in Microbiology & Immunology was held on Friday, Sep- 
tember 28th. The subject of Mrs. Kostyu's dissertation was 
"Serological Definition of the HLA-A, B and C Antigens." The 
committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors D. B . 
Amos, presiding. Geoffrey Haughton. Peter Cresswell, Frances 
Ward. Richard O. Burns, and Sheila J. Counce. 



The final examination of Ms. Patricia Whitaker Linville for the 
Ph.D. degree in Psychology was held on Friday, September 28. The 
subject of Ms. Linville's dissertation was "Dimensional Complexity 
and Evaluative Extremity: A Cognitive Model Predicting Polarized 
Evaluations of Outgroup Members." The committee conducting the 
examination consisted of Professors Timothy Wilson, presiding, 
Philip Costanzo, Edward Jones, Alan Levy, and John Payne. 



The final examination of Ms. Juliana Catherine Mulroy for the 
Ph.D. degree in Botany was held on Saturday. September 29th. The 
subject of Ms. Mulroys dissertation was "Contributions to the 
Ecology and Biogeography of the Saxifraga cespitosa L. Complex 
in the Americas." The committee conducting the examination con- 
sisted of Professors W. D. Billings, presiding, Boyd R. Strain, Janis 
Antonovics. Donald E. Stone, and Henry Hellmers. 



The final examination of Ms. Diane Chaffee for the Ph.D. degree 
in Romance Languages will be held on Tuesday, October 2nd, at 
3:00 p.m. in Room 307 Languages Building. The subject of Ms. 
Chaffee's dissertation is "The Variants of Gongora's Shorter 
Poems: A Study of His Poetic Craftsmanship." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors Bruce W. Wardrop- 
per. presiding. John M. Fein, Richard L. Predmore. and Leland R. 
Phelps. 



OCTOBER CALENDAR 



Lecture Speaker 



PSYCHO Bio- 



3 



BROTHER CARL" 



9:00 p m. Mangum 



VOLLEYBALL D. I 



Collages \ 
Campus G 
(104 Flowers 



JOE LINUS. 7.00 4 9:3 



Campus Gallery 



' DESTRY RIDES 
AGAIN . "Pest from 
the West " Bio. Sci 



6 



SUBMARINE . 



Speaker Barbara 



Speaker Prof 
Jean-Claude 
Margolin. York 

8 30 p.m D U U 
BROADWAY AT 

DUKE ESTELLE 
PARSONS in Mis 



ROBBERY Page 
Aud $150. 
8 15 p.m. Dept of 



9 



midnight Fubar Clut 

CLOCKWORK Rd 

ORANGE. Bio Sci. 3:00 j 



PIANO SONATA 

RECITAL with 
HJORDIS TOURIAN 
4 FRANCES 
EVANS EDMR 



PORTRAIT OF 
JASON." BiO. Sci. 



io 



11 



(AMERICAN F 
OF 1939 SERI . 
GONE WITH THE 



VOLLEYBALL DA 

Women vs. UNC-CH OF 1939 SERIES) 



MUSIC-DRAMA- 
POETRY-DANCE 
PROGRAM. Page 



12 



13 



7 00 4 9:30 p.m.. 
Midnight. Freewater 



AFRICAN QUEEN ' 



14 



IS 



Oct 15-20: Mangrc 
(Dance Company 
Residency 



Music ROBIN 
HUEST1S, Voice 
Recital, KATHRYN 



Speaker JULIAN 



16 



SUMMER OF 42. 



IT 



18 

Estates Planning 



19 



20 



CHEAT AN HONEST ANIMATION 
MAN . FESTIVAL " 

VDUCKING THEY Sci. Aud. I 



qhi Fteewaler Series ISLAND C 
"FANTASTIC THE BLUE 



DOLPHINS". Deep 



DID GO." Bio Sci 



Players AS YOU 



Players AS YOU 



LIKE n " Branson 8:15 | 
Theatre S2.50 A 



MURRAY PERAHIA WIZ 
P.amsl. Page Aud. $1.5 

S5 50. S4 50, S3 50 8 15 | 



Theatre S4 S3 



MURRAY PERAHIA 
4 the ClOMPl 
QUARTET EDMR 



21 



22 



23 



24 



23 



26 



2T 



1:00 am Chapet 


Mon -Wed. (Oct. 




4:00 p.m. FIELD 


7 00. 9:00 4 




Oct 26-28 PARENTS 


2:00-5:00 p.m. Phi 


1000 am FIELD 


(Homecoming): The 


22-24) 1979 Divi 


illy 


HOCKEY. D. U. 


11.00 p.m 






Kappa Psi 


HOCKEY O U 


Rev Dr Leander 


School 




Women vs Pleifter 


Mirecourt Movie 


7 00 4 9 30 p.m 


CHILDRENS 


Women vs N. C 


Keck 




C. 


College. 


PINK PANTHER ." 




CANCER BENEFIT 


Qub 


00 p.m. SOCCER. 


Pastors' School 




7 00 9004 11 00 


BiO Sci Au 


d $1.00 


WUTHERlNG 


AUCTION. 


11:00 am SOCCER 


Dukevs N. C.State. 






p.m. Delta Sigma 

Ph, Movie 


8 30 pm D 




HEIGHTS". 


Residential Quad. 




00 p.m. 










Popeye Meets 


3 00pm FIELD 


1 30 p.m 


MANGROVE Dance 


8 15 p.m. D. U. 




DIAMONDS ARE 


CHICAGO 




Aladdin and His 


HOCKEY Duke 


FOOTBALL Duke 


Company 


SYMPHONY 




FOREVE^ 


Aud $9 50 


$8 50 


Wonderful Lamp 


Women vs Catawba 


vs Maryland W W 


Performance. The 


ORCHESTRA w 






S7S0 




Bio. Sci Free, D U 


College. 






MURRAY PERAHIA. 


Si 50 






undergrads wiD s 


7 004930 p.m.. 


70049 15 pm 


00 4 9 30 p.m. 


Page Aud Sgi 




7 004930 p.m. 






$150, others 


midnight. F'eewater 


Quad Flicks THE 


Quad Flicks THE 


w DAS Season 




Freewater Film 






7 30 p m Triangle 


F,im CITIZEN 


INVASION OF THE 


WIZ Page Aud 


Tickets S4.50. 




THE CABINET OF 






Dance Guild ALVIN 


KANE ' Bio. Sci 


BODY 


S150 


S3.50.S2.50; oth 




DR CAUGARI 






AILEY LECTURE 


Aud. Free, D U 


SNATCHERS 


15 p.m. Duke 


$5.50. $4.50. $3 










DEMONSTRATION 


undergrads w.l D s. 


Page Aud $1 50 


Players AS YOU 












Page Aud $1 


$i. 50. others 


8 15 p.m Duke 


LIKE IT Branson 






Raison". "Emak 






8:00 p.m. 


8:00 p.m. Triangle 


Players AS YOU 


Theatre S4. S3 






Bakia." Bio. Sci. 

undergrads w i D s 
$1.50, others. 






Comparative Lit 
Lecture Speaker 
Pro! Zilkowski Rm 
226 Perkins Lib 
8 15 pm Duke 
Players AS YOU 
LIKE IT Branson 
Theatre $2 50 All 


AILEY REPERTORY 
ENSEMBLE. Page 
Aud S5 Sto 65-. 
S6 Gen. Public 
8 15 p.m. Duke 
Players AS YOU 
LIKE IT ' Branson 
Theatre $4 $3. 


Theatre $4 $3 



28 



29 



30 



31 



1 00 am Chapel 


Oct. 29-Nov 1 


4.00 p.m. FIELD 


7:00 4 9 30 p m. P< 


The Rev Mr Rob! 


Registration tor 


HOCKEY: D. U 


Upsiion Movie 




Spring Semester, 


Women vs. High 


THE CAINE 


00 p.m Durham 


1980. 


Point College. 


MUTINY' Bio. S< 




6 30 p.m 


7 00 4 9:30 p.m. 


Aud . $1 00 


Society: BENEFIT 


VOLLEYBALL D. U 


Freewater Films: 




CONCERT. Baldwin 


Women vs E C U 


NOSFERATU': 


VOLLEYBALL D 


Aud. S5 






Women vs N. C. 


.00 4 9 15 p.m 






State. 


Quad Flicks: THE 




Aud Free D. U 




INVASION OF THE 




undergrads w 1 D s: 




BODY 




Si 50. others. 




SNATCHERS 




7:30 p.m Phi Delta 




Page Aud. $1 50 




Theta Movie THE 




15 pm Duke 




GROOVE TUBE." 




Players "AS YOU 








LIKE IT Branson 




Aud. $1.50. 




Theatre $4. S3 




8 15 pm Dept, of 




15 pm Dept ol 




Music Faculty and 








Guest Recital JUDY 




Recital. WAYNE 




BENEDICT V.onn 




LAIL. Baritone 




JOHN RUGGERO 




EDMR Free 




Piano. EDMR. Free 
8 15 p.m. Black 
Student Alliance 
DANCE BLACK 

INVITATIONAL 





DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



CALENDAR^ 




October 7-14, 1979 



olume 79 



Published October 5, 1979 



Number 6 



Sunday, October 7 

9:30 & 1 1:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Divinity School). 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. C. Eric Lincoln, Prof, of Religion. 
Dept. of Religion. Duke University. The Service of Worship 
is broadcast over WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults, $3.50; children, Vi price. Wine service available after 
1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayers, 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: 'THE GREAT TRAIN 
ROBBERY." Page Aud. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. D. U. String School: VIOLIN & PIANO SONATA RE- 
CITAL with HJORDIS TOURIAN & FRANCES EVANS. 
E. D. Music Rm. Free. 

Monday, October 8 

October 8-11: Black Church Affairs Center Continuing Education 

Workshop/Symposium. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
3:30 p.m. Institute of Policy Sciences & Public Affairs and the 

Colloquia on The Fate of Social Programs in an Age of Fiscal 

Austerity Lecture: Speaker: Dr. J. Michael McGinnis. Rm. 

208 Perkins Lib. 
4:00 p.m. National Sigma Xi Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Henry M. 

Paynter. Rm. 125 Engr. Bldg. Aud. 
4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Ewald Weibel. Rm. 

Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.: midnight. Fubar Movie: 'CLOCKWORK 

ORANGE." Bio. Sci. Aud. $1.50. 

Tuesday, October 9 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics and Evolution Seminar. Speaker: 
Barry Hammel. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

2:00 p.m. Campus Club Newcomers' Tea. 1508 Pinecrest Rd. 

3:00 p.m. FIELD HOCKEY: D. U. Women vs. Appalachian St. 

4:00 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa. Duke Chapter. Rm. 226 Perkins Lib. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Donald Reis. 
Rm. 147 N. H. Duke Bldg. 

7:00 p.m. DFCANP Energy Seminar. Rm. 139 Soc. Sci. Bldg. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (WOMEN DIRECTORS 
SERIES): 'PORTRAIT OF JASON," dir. by Shirley Clarke. 
A cinema verite film encounter with the pain of a black, 
homosexual prostitute, rejected by society. Bio. Sci. Aud. 
Free, D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s; $1.50 others. 

7:00, 9:00 & 11:00 p.m. Sr. Class Movie: "THE AFRICAN 
QUEEN." Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. 99«. 

7:30 p.m. Office of Black Church Affairs and Continuing Educa- 
tion Address: JULIAN BOND. Page Aud. No adm. charge. 

Wednesday, October 10 

9:30 a.m. Durham Chamber of Commerce Tour. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Chapel (Chapel Basement). 
4:00 p.m. Dept. of Germanic Languages & Delta Phi Alpha Lec- 
ture. Speaker: Lore Armaleo-Popper. Rm. 226 Perkins Lib. 



7:00 p.m. Office of Continuing Educ. GRE Informational Session. 
Rm. 205 Carr Bldg. Fee. 

7,9, 11:00 p.m. Senior Class Movie: "THE AFRICAN QUEEN." 
Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. 

7:00 p.m. VOLLEYBALL: D. U. Women vs. UNC-CH. 

7:30 p.m. Office of Black Church Affairs and Continuing Educa- 
tion Program: "THE ARTS IN THE STRUGGLE FOR 
HUMAN RIGHTS." Free. 

Thursday, October 11 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology Seminar. 
Speaker: Dr. Sheldon Penman. Rm. 143 Jones Bldg. 

3:45 p.m. Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences 
Meeting. Rm. 139 Soc. Sci. Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Divinity School Lecture. Divinity School Stu. Lounge. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. York Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Freewater Film (AMERICAN FILMS OF 1939 
SERIES): "GONE WITH THE WIND." The Great Ameri- 
can Southern Epic, set against the passions of the Civil War 
and Reconstruction. Colossal in design and execution. Clark 
Gable, Vivien Leigh, Leslie Howard, Olivia de Haviland. 
First Showing at 7:00 p.m. in Bio. Sci. Aud. Second Showing 
(9:00 p.m.) in Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. Free, D. U. under- 
grads w/I.D.'s; $1.50 others. 

7:30 p.m. Divinity School Lecture. York Chapel. 

Friday, October 12 

Office of Continuing Educ. Conference of Dual-Career Marriages. 

D. U. Law School. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
11:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m. D. U. U. OKTOBERFEST. Main Quad. 
12:00 Noon. Women's Health Program. Room 226 Perkins Library. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Chapel Basement). 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Lewis Anderson. 
Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, of D. U. Prayers. York Rm. (Divinity 

School). 
3:30 p.m. Dept. of Chemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. L. Andrews. 

Rm. 103 Gross Chem. Lab. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.; midnight. Freewater Film (FRIDAY NIGHT 
SERIES): "LENNY." Biography of Lenny Bruce, contro- 
versial, "hip" nightclub comic of the 1950's. Dustin 
Hoffman, Valerie Perrine. Bio. Sci. Aud. Free, D. U. under- 
grads w/I. D.'s; $1.50 others. 
8:00 p.m. D. U. Major Attractions Committee presents ROY 
AYERS in Concert. Page Auditorium. $7, Reserved; $6, Gen. 
Pub. 

Saturday, October 13 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
1:00 p.m. D. U. U. Crafts Center Kodalith Workshop. Crafts 

Center. 
2:00 p.m. Soccer: Duke vs. Madison. 
5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Divinity School). 
7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "NORMA RAE." Based 

on the true story of a N. C. textile mill worker and her role in 

a labor dispute. Sally Field and Ron Liebman. Bio. Sci. Free, 

D. U. undergrads w/I. D.'s; $1.50 others. 



Sunday, October 14 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel (Divinity School). 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 

Preacher: The Rev. Mr. Robert T. Young, Minister to the 

University. The Service of Worship is broadcast over WDBS. 

107.1 FM. 
2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 
7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "NORMA RAE." Page 

Aud. $1.50. 
7:00 p.m. Arts in the Chapel Organ Recital: VIRGINIA VANCE. 

Chapel. Free. 
8:15 p.m. Voice Recital: ROBIN HUESTIS, Soprano; KAT- 

HRYN HUESTIS, Pianist, EDMR. Free. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of October 14th-21st is 
Monday, October 8th, before 3:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY STRING SCHOOL 
RECITAL 

The Duke University String School will present "A 
Violin and Piano Sonata Recital," Hjordis Tourian, 
violinist, and Frances Evans, pianist on Sunday, Oc- 
tober 7th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. 
The program follows: 
Sonata XI. Op. 6 Tomaso Albinoni 

Grave Adagio (1671-1750) 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Allegro 



Sonate in C (1939) Paul Hindemith 

Lebhaft (1895-1963) 

Langsam — Lebhaft — Langsam, wie zuerst 

Fuge, Ruhig bewegt 
Sonata in G major. Op. 96 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Allegro moderato (1770-1827) 

Adagio expressivo 

Scherzo — Allegro 

Poco allegretto — Adagio — Allegro 

The public is invited. Admission is free. 



THE INSTITUTE OF POLICY SCIENCES 
AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS MEETINGS 

During the 1979-80 academic year, the Institute of 
Policy Sciences and Public Affairs at Duke University 
will sponsor a colloquia on "The Fate of Social Pro- 
grams in an Age of Fiscal Austerity." A number of 
distinguished policy analysts have been invited to ex- 
amine various aspects of this issue with students, fac- 
ulty, and guests of the Institute. The lectures will be 
held on Wednesday afternoons at 3:00 p.m., with the 
exception of the October 8th speech, which begins at 
3:30 p.m., in Room 204 Perkins Library. The public is 
invited, and there will be an opportunity for questions 
and discussion. 

On October 8th, Dr. J. Michael McGinnis, Deputy 
Assistant Secretary for Health (Disease Prevention 
and Health Promotion) in HEW, will speak on "The 
Fate of Social Programs in an Age of Fiscal Auster- 
ity." On October 10th, Dr. Robert W. Hartman, a 
Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and co- 
author of several of Brookings' annual budget 
analyses. Setting National Priorities, will speak on 
"The Evolution of the 1980 Budget." 

NATIONAL SIGMA XI LECTURE 

Duke University Chapter of Sigma XI and the De- 
partment of Mechanical Engineering and Materials 
Science will sponsor a lecture on Monday, October 
8th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 125 Engineering Building 
Auditorium. Professor Henry M. Paynter, Professor of 
Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, will speak on "Chemical and Biologi- 
cal Oscillations: How and Why?" 

Professor Paynter received his undergraduate and 
graduate degrees at M.I.T. where he is currently 
Senior Professor of System Dynamics and Control in 
the M. E. Department. His research interests include 
the areas of power system dynamics, process control, 
computer simulation, and system engineering. He is an 
author or co-author of several books and has published 
extensively in the above areas. In his lecture Professor 
Paynter will discuss the general characteristics of 
biological and chemical oscillations and the reasons for 
their occurrence. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, October 8th, at 4:15 p.m., in Room 111 of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Ewald Weibel will speak 



on "Oxygen Needs and the Size of Respiratory 
Structures."' Professor Weibel holds the Chair of 
Anatomy at Bern, Switzerland, and is currently Visit- 
ing Agassiz Professor at Harvard University. Coffee 
and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS 
AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Barry Hammel, graduate student, Department of 
Botany, will present a seminar entitled "Systematics 
of the Genus Crypsis (Gramineae) in the New World 
or, Three Old Species of Grass from California" on 
Tuesday, October 9th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 130 
Biological Sciences Building. 



CAMPUS CLUB NEWCOMERS' RECEPTION 

A reception honoring Campus Club newcomers will 
be held at the President's home, 1508 Pinecrest Road, 
on Tuesday, October 9th, from 2:00-4:00 p.m. 



PHI BETA KAPPA MEETING 

PHI BETA KAPPA, Duke Chapter, will meet 4 
p.m., October 9th in 226 Perkins Library. All members 
are urged to attend. Newcomers to the Duke commu- 
nity who are members of Phi Beta Kappa may affiliate 
with the Duke Chapter by sending name, year and 
place of election, and local address to the Secretary, 
401 Perkins Library, or Box 4795 Duke Station, Dur- 
ham, N. C. 27706. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Pharmacology, DUMC, will 
sponsor a seminar on Tuesday, October 9th, at 4:00 
p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building with 
Donald Reis, Director, Laboratory of Neuro-biology, 
Cornell Medical Center, as speaker. His topic will be 
"Genetic Control of the Number of Dopamine 
Neurons in Relation to Behavior and Response to 
Psychoactive Drugs." Coffee will be served in the 
lobby at 3:45 p.m. 



DFCANP ENERGY SEMINAR 
ON EFFICIENT TRANSPORTATION 

The Duke Faculty Committee on Alternatives to 
Nuclear Power will sponsor an energy seminar on 
Tuesday, October 9th, at 7:00 p.m. in Room 139 Social 
Sciences Building. The seminar will feature a discus- 
sion of "Conservation and Fuel Efficiency in Trans- 
portation" by Duke University Mechanical Engineer- 
ing Professor Tim Hight, supervisor of the "Blue 
Devil" efficient car project. The seminar is open to all 
concerned members of the community. Refreshments 
will be served. 



DUKE DIVINITY SCHOOL OFFICE OF 

BLACK CHURCH AFFAIRS WORKSHOP: 

HUMAN RIGHTS 

The Duke Divinity School Office of Black Church 
Affairs will sponsor a Continuing Education Workshop 
on "Human Rights: The Black Church and Theol- 
ogy," October 8-11 in Duke Divinity School, West 
Campus in Durham, North Carolina. Important 
Church leaders and educators will come together in a 
symposium that will address the issues related to the 
struggles for human rights. The workshop is designed 
to: (1) Examine pertinent issues in human rights as it 
relates to the Black Church and Christian Theology 
and the third world. (2) Explore the implication of 
these issues for education, social, political and 
economic reform. (3) Sensitize and raise the con- 
sciousness level of seminar participants as to some of 
the human rights issues in their own communities. 

Senator Julian Bond of the Georgia Legislature will 
highlight the conference with a keynote address on: 
"Human Rights and Politics as it relates to Black 
People." The address is scheduled for Tuesday, Oc- 
tober 9th, at 7:30 p.m. in the Page Auditorium. 

Dr. Roy M. Morrison, II, Professor of Theology and 
Philosophy, Wesley Theological Seminary in 
Washington, D. C. will give the opening address, 
Monday afternoon on: "The Theological Under- 
standing of Human Rights." The Monday evening 
forum will bring together an African and Black Ameri- 
can Churchman, Dr. C. Eric Lincoln of Duke Divinity 
School and Dr. Cannon Burgess Carr of Harvard Di- 
vinity School on the theme: "Human Rights/ 
Liberation emphases in the Black Church in America 
and Africa." 

Workshop participants will have ample opportunity 
of interacting with workshop leaders through major 
addresses, small groups, and panel discussions. The 
conference will deal with human rights issues on: 
Economic Justice, Education, Criminal Justice and 
Racism and Sexism. On Wednesday, October 10 at 
7:30 p.m. in the Page Auditorium, a special program 
will feature "The Arts in the Struggle for Human 
Rights," through the use of drama, dance, poetry, 
jazz, spiritual and gospel music. 

Other Church and Civic leaders for the Symposium 
will include: Dr. Charles Cobb, Executive Director of 
the United Church of Christ for Racial Justice, New 
York City; The Rev. Lucius Walker, Executive Di- 
rector of Interreligious Foundation for Community 
Organization (IFCO), New York City; The Reverend 
Dr. Herbert O. Edwards, Associate Professor of Black 
Church Studies, Duke Divinity School; The Rev. Wil- 
liam H. Finlator, Pullen Memorial Baptist Church, 
Raleigh, North Carolina; Dr. Tommie Young, Profes- 
sor of Education at North Carolina A & T, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina; and Dr. Carolyn Johnson, Spe- 
cial Research for the National Institute of Education 
(NIE), Purdue University, West Lafayette. Indiana. 

The program is being coordinated and administered 
by Dr. Lawrence E. Johnson, Director of Black 



Church Affairs of Duke Divinity School. For further 
information and registration forms, contact: Dr. Law- 
rence E. Johnson, Director of Black Church Affairs, 
The Divinity School, Duke University, Durham, NC 
27706; tel. 684-6795, 684-3234. 

CHANGE: POL. SCI. COLLOQUIUM SERIES 

The Political Science Colloquium "The Lessons of 
Vietnam and American Foreign Policy," scheduled for 
Wednesday, October 10th, has been rescheduled to 
Wednesday, October 17th, at 1:00 p.m., in Room 307 
Perkins Library. 

DURHAM CHAMBER OF COMMERCE TOUR 

The Durham Chamber of Commerce will sponsor a 
series of DURHAM FIRST bus tours on Wednesday, 
October 10th. Five buses will leave at 9:30 a.m. that 
morning for a full day of visiting Durham's special 
places. Starting points for the tour will include the 
Ramada Inn (downtown), Lakewood Shopping 
Center, Northgate Shopping Center, and South Square 
Mall. The cost of the trip, which includes transporta- 
tion, lunch, and a Coca Cola break during the day, is 
$5.00 per person. The tour will conclude at about 2:30 
p.m. Please contact the Durham Chamber of Com- 
merce for tickets at 682-2133. Or, reservations can be 
mailed to the Chamber of Commerce at Post Office 
Box 610, Durham, N. C. 27702. Please enclose a 
check, made payable to the Durham Chamber of 
Commerce, for $5.00 per person. The deadline for res- 
ervations is Monday, October 8th. 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMANIC LANGUAGES 
AND DELTA PHI ALPHA LECTURE 

The Department of Germanic Languages and Delta 
Phi Alpha announce a lecture by Lore Armaleo- 
Popper, "Business German: Teaching Learning 
Methods," on Wednesday, October 10th, at 4:00 p.m. 
in Room 226 Perkins Library. 



OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 
GRE INFORMATIONAL SESSION 

The Duke University Office of Continuing Educa- 
tion will sponsor a Graduate Record Examination In- 
formational Session on Wednesday, October 10th, from 
7:00-10:00 p.m. in Room 205 Carr Building, East 
Campus. The fee is $15.00. More information is avail- 
able by calling 684-6259. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 

The Department of Microbiology and Immunology 
will sponsor a seminar on Thursday, October 11th, at 
12:30 p.m. in Room 143 Jones Building. Dr. Sheldon 
Penman, Department of Biology, MIT, will lecture on 
"Cytoarchitecture and Macromolecular Metabolism." 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL 
OF ARTS AND SCIENCES MEETING 

There will be a meeting of the Undergraduate Fac- 
ulty Council of Arts and Sciences on Thursday, Oc- 
tober 11th, at 3:45 p.m., in 139 Social Sciences. 

DUKE DIVINITY SCHOOL LECTURES 

Ann Matter, Asst. Prof, in the Dept. of Religion, 
University of Pennsylvania, will be visiting the Divin- 
ity School on Thursday, October 1 1th, for two lectures 
which will be open to the public: 

4:00 p.m. "Mothers of the Church"' 

Divinity School Student Lounge, 2nd 

floor, new building 
7:30 p.m. "The Seven Seals of the Apocalypse: 

Liturgy and Exegesis in the Early Middle 

Ages" 

York Chapel 

Any interested persons are welcome to join Profes- 
sor Matter in the Oak Room at 6:00 p.m. for dinner and 
informal conversation. 

D.U.U. SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE 
SPONSORS OKTOBERFEST 

The Duke University Special Events Committee will 
sponsor an Oktoberfest on Friday, October 12th, from 
10:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. on the Main Quad. The 
event will feature area craftsmen, bands, a perfor- 
mance by the Duke University Wind Symphony, with 
a cookout catered by the dining halls from 5:00-7:00 
p.m. Oktoberfest is open to the public and there is no 
admission fee. 

WOMEN'S HEALTH PROGRAM 

The Women's Health Program will sponsor the 
lunch-time film and discussion "Five Women, Five 
Births" on Friday, October 12th, at 12:00 noon in 
Room 226 Perkins Library. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

A plant ecology seminar with Dr. Lewis Anderson, 
Botany Department, will be held on Friday, October 
12th, Room 144 Biological Sciences Building at 12:30 
p.m. Dr. Anderson will speak on "Floristics and 
Physiography of the North Carolina Mountains." 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. L. Andrews from the University of Virginia will 
present a seminar entitled "Spectroscopy of Matrix- 
Isolated Molecular Ions" on Friday, October 12th, at 
3:30 p.m. in Room 103 Gross Chemical Lab. Refresh- 
ments will be served in the Lobby at 3:10 p.m. 

D. U. U. MAJOR ATTRACTIONS 
COMMITTEE PRESENTS ROY AYERS 

The Duke University Union Major Attractions 
Committee will present Roy Ayers in concert on Fri- 



day, October 12th, at 8:00 p.m. in Page Auditorium. 
Ticket prices are $7 Reserved and $6 General Admis- 
sion and are available at Page Box Office. 

DUAL-CAREER MARRIAGE 
CHALLENGES CONFERENCE 

Topics pertinent to two-worker families will be 
explored in a two-day conference at the Duke Univer- 
sity Law School on Friday evening, October 12th and 
Saturday, October 13th. The conference, sponsored 
by the Duke University Office of Continuing Educa- 
tion, will deal with new attitudes men and women find 
they must learn as they seek personal and professional 
goals as members of families where both partners are 
working. 

The keynote speaker at the conference will be Nikki 
Scott, nationally syndicated columnist and author of 
"The Working Woman" and "The Balancing Act." In 
addition to small group workshops, participants will 
also hear talks by Elisabeth Peterson, attorney, on 
"The Legal and Financial Dimensions of Two Worker 
Families"; Mary Mericle of the Duke Graduate School 
of Business Administration on "Employers' Attitudes 
Toward Managers in Dual Career Marriages;" Betty 
Busko, marriage counselor, on "Dual Career Mar- 
riages: Problems, Possibilities, and Potentials"; Jan 
Bruckman, Fellow, Center for the Study of the Family 
and State, on ". . . And What About the Children?"; 
and Jean O'Barr, Director of Continuing Education on 
"Dual Career Families." 

Attendees will be men and women in two-worker 
families, couples in transition, where one partner is 
starting a job or school, people considering entering 
two career marriages, and managers in education and 
business who employ members of dual career families. 

The cost of attending the conference is $22.00 per 
person or $32.00 per couple. Registration may be com- 
pleted by sending a check, payable to Duke Univer- 
sity, to: Marilyn Hartman, Office of Continuing Edu- 
cation, 107 Bivins, Duke University, Durham, N. C. 
27708. Registrations will be acknowledged along with 
pertinent details of the conference schedule. Further 
information may be obtained by calling the Office of 
Continuing Education at 684-6259. 

D. U. U. CRAFTS CENTER 
KODALITH WORKSHOP 

The D. U. U. Crafts Center will sponsor a Kodalith 
Workshop at the Crafts Center (northeast wing of 
Southgate Dorm, East Campus) on Saturday, October 
13th, from 1:00-5:00 p.m. This high contrast graphic 
arts material is a primary means of creative darkroom 
manipulation, including high contrast, tone-line deri- 
vations, and posteration. Each participant in the work- 
shop should bring two or three negatives or slides; 
other materials will be provided. Tuition for the work- 
shop is $14.00. Victor Lukas will be the instructor. 
More information is available by calling 684-6213, 
3:00-6:00 p.m. 



ARTS IN DUKE CHAPEL ORGAN RECITAL 

The Arts in Duke Chapel will present Virginia Vance 
in an organ recital on Sunday, October 14th, at 7:00 
p.m. in the University Chapel. Miss Vance is Chair- 
man of the Music Department at Peace College, where 
she teaches courses in music theory, music apprecia- 
tion, and organ. She received the Bachelor of Music 
degree from Salem College, where she was a student of 
Dr. John S. Mueller, and the Master of Music degree 
from the Yale University School of Music, where she 
studied organ with Charles Krigbaum. During the 
academic year 1971-72, Miss Vance was a Fulbright 
Scholar at the Hochschule fur Musik in Vienna, 
studying organ with the internationally acclaimed 
organ virtuoso, Anton Heiller. Prior to her appoint- 
ment at Peace College, Miss Vance taught piano and 
organ in the Preparatory Department of the Salem 
College School of Music and was Director of Music at 
Reynola Presbyterian Church in Winston-Salem. Re- 
cent performances have included concerts at the 1977 
AGO Regional Convention in Winston-Salem, Florida 
State University, the Thirteenth Moravian Music Fes- 
tival, and the 1979 Convention of the North Carolina 
Music Teachers Association. 

Her program follows: 

Three Noels 
AUons voir ce divin Gage 
A minuit fut fait un Reveil 
A minuit fut fait un Reveil 



Jean-Francois Dandrieu 
(1682-1738) 



Chorale Prelude: Nun bitten 

wir den heilgen Geist 
Prelude and Fugue in C Major 
Trio super: Herr Jesu Christ, 

dich zu uns wend', S. 655 
Prelude and Fugue in C Minor, S. 546 

Two Chorale Preludes 

Zeuch ein zu deinen Toren 

Straf mich nicht in deinem Zorn 
Choral No. 3 in A Minor 



Georg Bohm 

(1661-1737) 

Bohm 

Johann Sebastian Bach 

(1685-1750) 

Bach 

Johann Ludwig Krebs 

(1713-1780) 

Gottfried August Homilius 

(1714-1785) 

Cesar Franck 

(1822-1890) 



VOICE RECITAL ROBIN HUESTIS 

Wayne Lail, a member of the Duke University De- 
partment of Music voice faculty, will present Robin 
Huestis, soprano, in recital on Sunday evening, Oc- 
tober 14th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. 
Kathryn Heustis will accompany her daughter, Robin. 

The program, which follows, is open to the public 
without charge: 



Le Marriage des Roses 

Les Trois Prieres 

Le Roitelet 

Oh, Had I Jubals Lyre, from JOSHUA 

Let the Bright Seraphim, from SAMSON 

Loveliest of Trees 

Acquainted with the Night 

The Mountains are Dancing 

Just-Spring 

Verborgenheit 

Mignon (III) 

So Willst du des Armen 



Cesar Franck 
E. Paladilhe 



G. F. Handel 



John Duke 



Hugo Wolf 
Johannes Brahms 



Von ewiger Liebe 
Meine Liebe ist grun 
V. The Black Swan, from THE MEDIUM 
Monica' s Waltz, from THE MEDIUM 



Gian Carlo Menotti 



Robin Huestis, a graduate of Duke University, 
studied piano with Ronald Fishbaugh and Joseph 
Kitchen. Her senior year (1975) she and her mother, 
Kathryn Huestis, gave a two-piano recital. She sang in 
the Chapel Choir for several years and has been a so- 
loist at St. Stephen's Episcopal Church for 2 years. 
Ms. Huestis is a voice student of Wayne Lail. She has 
recently taken part in the Duke Opera Workshop 
under the direction of John Hanks. 

Kathryn Huestis is the Staff Accompanist for the 
Duke University Department of Music for vocal and 
chamber music recitals and the Opera Workshop. She 
teaches piano privately in Durham. 

DUKE ARTISTS SERIES CONCERT 
MURRAY PERAHIA, PIANO SOLOIST 

The Duke Artists Series will open its Fiftieth An- 
niversary Season with pianist Murray Perahia on Fri- 
day, October 19th, at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. 
Remaining tickets, available at Page Box Office, are 
priced at $4.50 and $3.50. 
The program for this concert follows: 
Sonata No. 11 in Bb, Op. 22 Beethoven 

Allegro con brio 
Adagio con molto espressione 
Menuetto 
Rondo, Allegretto 



Fantasiestucke 

I. Das Abends 

II. Aufschwung 

III. Warum 1 

IV. Grillen 

V. In der Nacht 

VI. Fabel 

VII. Traumeswirren 

VIII. Ende vom Lied 
Suite, Opus 14 

Allegretto 
Scherzo 
Allegro molto 
Sostenuto 
Fantasy in F minor 
Berceuse 
Barcarolle 



Schumann 



Bartok 



Chopin 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
CIOMPI QUARTET WITH MURRAY PERAHIA 

The Chamber Arts Society will sponsor five 
chamber music concerts for the year 1979-80. Season 
tickets priced at $25 are still available, tickets are 
transferable. Checks should be made out to the 
Chamber Arts Society and sent to P. O. Box 6065, 
College Station, Durham, NC 27707; tel. 684-3836. 

Murray Perahia will join Duke's Ciompi Quartet for 
the first concert of the season on Saturday October 
20th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Building Music 
Room. A limited number of individual tickets at $6.00 
will be on sale at the door, beginning at 7:30 p.m. 



Members of the Ciompi Quartet are Giorgio Ciompi, 
violin; Claudia Erdberg, violin; George Taylor, Viola, 
and Frederick Raimi, Cello. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
WITH MURRAY PERAHIA, PIANIST 

The Department of Music will present the Duke 
Symphony Orchestra, Allan Bone conducting, in a 
concert on Monday, October 22nd, at 8:15 p.m. Mur- 
ray Perahia, pianist, will be the soloist for the perfor- 
mance. 

Tickets, priced at $4.50, 3.50, & 2.50, are now avail- 
able at Page Box Office. All seats are reserved and 
purchasing of tickets may be made by Mastercharge/ 
Visa calling the Box Office (684-3227) between 10:00 
a.m. and 3:00 p.m. 
The Program follows: 

"Romeo and Juliet" (1869) Tchaikovsky 

Overture-Fantasy (1840-1893) 

Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor [K. 491] (1786) Mozart 

Allegro (1756-1791) 

Larghetto 
Allegretto 

Mr. Perahia 
— Intermission — 
Symphony No. I in C minor. Opus 68 (1876) Brahms 

Un poco sostenuto— Allegro (1833-1897) 

Andante sostenuto 
Un poco Allegretto e grazioso 
Adagio — piu Andante — Allegro non troppo 

SPECIAL NOTICE 
MEETING OF THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

The regular fall meeting of the University Faculty 
will be held on Tuesday, October 23rd, at 4:00 p.m. in 
the School of Engineering Auditorium. This will be a 
business meeting. Chancellor Pye will preside and give 
the report on the state of the University. Chairman 
Lawrence Evans will report on the activities and plans 
of the Academic Council. Immediately following the 
meeting, the faculty will be invited to adjourn to the 
Union Ballroom for a social hour at which cheese and 
wine will be served. 

BOTANICAL ART EXHIBIT PLANNED 

The North Carolina Botanical Garden will have an 
exhibit of contemporary botanical art on display in the 
Totten Center during the month of November. All area 
and Duke artists are encouraged to submit their 2- 
dimensional works. Details are available from the 
Garden (967-2246). 

DINING HALLS INFORMATION 

The Oak Room is open Monday through Friday and 
on Sunday for lunch and dinner. Specials are offered at 
each mealtime as well as a soup-and-sandwich combi- 
nation at lunch. The cheeseboard with cheese and 
wine and "Happy Hour" prices on pitchers of beer, is 
available Sunday evenings. Lunch is served from 1 1:30 



a.m. -2:00 p.m. Dinner is from 5:00-7:00 p.m. The Sprig 
Salad Bar, served buffet style this year, is open for 
lunch Monday through Friday. Fresh tossed salad, 
soup, breads, desserts, and beverages are served. 

DUKE HOMESITES: HOUSE FOR SALE 

Only those homes located on lots originally de- 
veloped and sold by the University and which are still 
owned by a member of the faculty or staff of the Uni- 
versity will be listed in the University Calendar. Fred 
E. Miller, tel. 684-2054, has information regarding 
listings. The house listed below is for sale and infor- 
mation about that house is available from the tele- 
phone listed: 

Location: 2745 McDowell Street 
Telephone: 489-4773 
Number of Bedrooms: Three (3) 
Number of Baths: 2Vi 

Type of Heating/ Air Conditioning: Gas Heat; Central Air Condi- 
tioning 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. David Lee Wood, Jr. for the Ph.D. 
degree in Romance Languages was held on Friday, October 5th. The 
subject of Mr. Wood's dissertation was "Comeille's Polyeucte: The 
Major Interpretations." The committee conducting the examination 
consisted of Professors Philip Stewart, presiding, Alexander Hull, 
Robert Neiss, Patrick Vincent, and Ernesto Caserta. 



The final examination of Mr. Stephen J. Harris for the Ph.D. 
degree in History will be held on Friday, October 12th at 1:30 p.m. in 
Room 237 Social Science building. The subject of Mr. Harris' dis- 
sertation is "Canadian Brass: The Growth of the Canadian Military 
Profession 1860-1919." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Richard Preston, presiding, John Cell, Theo- 
dore T. Ropp, and Allan A. Romberg. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 

Published by Duke University PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



CALENDAR! 




October 14-21, 1979 



olume 79 



Published October 12, 1979 



Number 7 



Sunday, October 14 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Mr. Robert T. Young, Minister to the 
University. The Service of Worship is broadcast over WDBS, 
107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults, $3.50; children, Vi price. Wine service available after 
1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3.00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayer. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: -NORMA RAE." Based 
on the true story of an N. C. textile worker and her role in a 
labor dispute. Sally Field and Ron Liebman. Page Aud. $1.50. 

7:00 p.m. Arts in the Chapel Organ Recital: VIRGINIA VANCE. 
Chapel. Free. 

8:15 p.m. Voice Recital: ROBIN HUESTIS Soprano: KATHRYN 
HUESTIS, Pianist. EDMR. Free. 

Monday, October 15 

Oct. 15-20. MANGROVE (Dance) Residency. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry Special Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

Michael Sicard. Rm. 147 N. H. Duke Bldg. 
3:00 p.m. Dept. of Forestry Seminar. Speaker: Mary Sizemore. 

Rm. 202 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
3:30 p.m. Meeting of the University Review Committee on the Use 

of Human Subjects in Non-Medical Research. Board Rm., 

Allen Bldg. 
4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Samuel S. 

Sweet. Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

Tuesday, October 16 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Botany Plant Systematics & Evolution Semi- 
nar. Speaker: Dr. Janis Antonovics. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

3:00 p.m. Institute of Policy Sciences & Public Affairs/Dept. of 
Pol. Sci. Colloquium. Speaker: Wm. Rodgers. MP. Rm. 204 
Perkins Lib. 

3:00 p.m. Dept. of Forestry Seminar. Speaker: Mary Sizemore. 
Rm. 202 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. E. Leone 
Way. Rm. 147 N. H. Duke Bldg. 

7:00. 9:00 & 11:00 p.m. M. S. Majors Film: 'SUMMER OF 42. " 
Gross Chem. Aud. $1. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (Women Directors Series): LE 
BONHEUR." The story of one man in love with two women. 
Beautiful film in Renoir colors. Also, "Meshes of the After- 
noon." Bio. Sci. Free, D. U. undergrads w/I.D.*s; $1.50 
others. 

7:00 p.m. DFCANP Energy Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Joe Graedon. 
Rm. 139 Soc. Sci. Bldg. 

Wednesday, October 17 

9:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 



12:30 p.m. Dept. of Educ./KDP Luncheon. Speaker: Dr. Mary 

Mayesky. Rm. 202 W. D. Bldg. 
1:00 p.m. Dept. of Pol. Sci. Colloquium. Speaker: Dr. Ole R. Hol- 

sti. Rm. 307 Perkins Lib. 
3:00 p.m. Dept. of Forestry Seminar. Speaker: Mary Sizemore. 

Rm. 202 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
4:00 p.m. SOCCER: Duke vs. Campbell. 
7:00, 9:00 & 1 1:00 p.m. Duke Republicans Movie: "KENTUCKY 

FRIED MOVIE." Bio. Sci. $1. 

Thursday, October 18 

Estates Planning Council Meeting. 
8:00 p.m. MANGROVE (Dance) Performance. The Ark. $1.50 

Stu./Sr. Cit.; $3.00 others. 
9:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
3:00 p.m. School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Expert 

Witness Demonstration. Moot Court Rm., Law School. 
5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. York Chapel. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (American Films of 1939 Series): 

"YOU CAN'T CHEAT AN HONEST MAN." W. C. Fields 

as circus proprietor. Also, "A-Ducking They Did Go" with 

The Three Stooges. Free, D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s; $1.50, 

others. 
7:45 p.m. A. I. A. Duke Center for Judaic Studies Lecture. 

Speaker: Prof. Yigael Shiloh. York Chapel. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "AS YOU LIKE IT." Branson Theatre. 

All Seats, $2.50. 

Friday, October 19 

HOMECOMING WEEKEND 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:00 noon. Women's Health Program Lecture and Discussion. 

Rm. 226 Perkins Lib. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Nancy 

Kleckner. Rm. 147 N. H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Botany Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: John 
Horn. Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, of D. U. Prayers. York Chapel. 
1:30 p.m. Engineering Alumni Assoc. Colloquium on Computers. 

Engr. Bldg. Aud. 
3:30 p.m. Dept. of Chemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. J. M. 

McBride. Rm. 103 Gross Chem. Lab. 
4:00 p.m. Dept. of Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. E. Leong 

Way. Rm. 147 N. H. Duke Bldg. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m., midnight. Freewater Film (Friday Night Series): 
"FANTASTIC ANIMATION FESTIVAL." Short master- 
pieces of animation, including award winners. Bio. Sci. Aud. 
Free, D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s; $1.50, others. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "AS YOU LIKE IT." Branson Theatre. 

$4, $3. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Artists Series: MURRAY PERAHIA, Pianist. 
Page Aud. Remaining Seats, $4.50, $3.50. 



Saturday, October 20 

Davison Club Meeting. 

10:30 a.m. Freewater Children's Films: 



ISLAND OF THE BLUE 



DOLPHINS." Also, "Deep Blue World." Gross Chem. Lab. 

Aud. $1.50. 
1:30 p.m. FOOTBALL (HOMECOMING): Duke vs. Clemson. 

W. W. Stadium. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "THE WIZ." The movie 

version of the stage version of The Wizard of Oz. With Diana 

Ross as Dorothy movin' on down the Yellow Brick Road. 

Page Aud. $1.50. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "AS YOU LIKE IT." Branson Theatre. 

$4, $3. 
8:15 p.m. Chamber Arts Society Concert with MURRAY 

PERAHIA & the CIOMPI QUARTET. EDMR. $6. 

Sunday, October 21 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Homecoming Sunday. 
University Chapel. Preacher: The Rev. Dr. Leander Keck, 
Dean, Yale Divinity School. The Service of Worship is 
broadcast over WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room. E. Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults, $3.50; children under 12, V2 price. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayer. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. "THE WIZ." Page Aud. 
$1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "AS YOU LIKE IT." Branson Theatre. 
$4, $3. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of October 21 st-28th is 
Monday, October 15th, before 3:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 
PUBLICATIONS POLICY 

Due to the limitation of space in the Duke Uni- 
versity Weekly Calendar, published by the Office of 
Cultural Affairs, only on-campus events will be 
listed. The only exception to this will be off-campus 
programs that are officially sponsored by a depart- 
ment or a chartered organization of the University. 
It is further interpreted that events sponsored by the 
Durham Arts Council will be included in the Calen- 
dar since Duke University, along with North 
Carolina Central University, are members of the 
Arts Assembly of the Durham Arts Council. 



VOICE RECITAL ROBIN HUESTIS 

Wayne Lail, a member of the Duke University De- 
partment of Music voice faculty, will present Robin 
Huestis, soprano, in recital on Sunday evening, Oc- 
tober 14th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. 
Kathryn Heustis will accompany her daughter, Robin. 
The program, which follows, is open to the public 
without charge: 

I. Le Marriage des Roses Cesar Franck 

Les Trois Prieres E. Paladilhe 

Le Roitelet 
II. Oh, Had I Jubals Lyre, from JOSHUA G. F. Handel 

Let the Bright Seraphim, from SAMSON 

III. Loveliest of Trees John Duke 
Acquainted with the Night 

The Mountains are Dancing 
Just-Spring 

IV. Verborgenheit Hugo Wolf 
Mignon (III) 

So Willst du des Armen Johannes Brahms 

Von ewiger Liebe 
Meine Liebe ist grun 
V. The Black Swan, from THE MEDIUM Gian Carlo Menotti 
Monica' s Waltz, from THE MEDIUM 

Robin Huestis, a graduate of Duke University, 
studied piano with Ronald Fishbaugh and Joseph 
Kitchen. Her senior year (1975) she and her mother, 
Kathryn Huestis, gave a two-piano recital. She sang in 
the Chapel Choir for several years and has been a so- 
loist at St. Stephen's Episcopal Church for 2 years. 
Ms. Huestis is a voice student of Wayne Lail. She has 
recently taken part in the Duke Opera Workshop 
under the direction of John Hanks. 

Kathryn Huestis is the Staff Accompanist for the 
Duke University Department of Music for vocal and 
chamber music recitals and the Opera Workshop. She 
teaches piano privately in Durham. 

ART EXHIBITION BY LINUS 

Recent works by LINUS will be exhibited October 
5-October 31 at Duke University in the West Gallery, 
104 Flowers Building. The exhibit, sponsored by the 
Duke University Union Galleries Committee, includes 
acrylic paintings, colored pencil drawings, and col- 
lages. 



ARTISTS EXHIBITION 
PAUL FEILER 

Recent works by contemporary British artist Paul 
Feiler will be exhibited October 13-November 14th at 
Duke University in the East Gallery, East Campus Li- 
brary. 

The exhibit, sponsored by the Duke University 
Union Galleries Committee, will include a series of 
large silk screen prints and smaller gouaches. Both 
forms explore the interaction of circle and line ex- 
pressed in delicate hues. In addition, some oil paint- 
ings from Feiler' s earlier works of the 50' s will be on 
display. The silk screen prints and the gouaches will be 
for sale through the Duke Union. 

Born in 1918, Feiler received his education at the 
Slade School of Fine Arts in London, earning a degree 
in Fine Art at London University in 1940. Sub- 
sequently, Feiler has taught and exhibited his work in 
England, the U. S., Africa, and other parts of the 
world. 

Major art galleries in London as well as the Alber- 
tina Collection in Vienna, the National Gallery of New 
Zealand, Biblioteque National in Paris, the Toronto 
Art Gallery in Canada, the Phillips Memorial Gallery 
in Washington, D. C, the Pennsylvania State 
Museum, and the City Art Gallery in Toledo, Ohio (to 
name a few) have permanently acquired works by Paul 
Feiler. 

After heading the Department of Painting at Bristol 
Polytechnique in Bristol for 15 years, Paul Feiler is 
now a principal lecturer there. He lives in Cornwall in 
a converted chapel. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY 
SPECIAL SEMINAR 

The Department of Biochemistry will sponsor a spe- 
cial seminar on Monday, October 15th, at 12:30 p.m. 
in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building, with Dr. 
Michel Sicard of the C.N.R.S. Center for Biochemis- 
try and Cell Genetics, Toulouse, France. Dr. Sicard's 
topic will be "Transformation of Pneumococcus with 
Pneumococcus-Lambda Phage Hybrid DNA: Induc- 
tion of Deletions." 

DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY SEMINAR 

A three-part seminar on forestry consulting and 
anti-trust in the forest industry will be presented by 
Mary Sizemore of the legal firm Sizemore and Size- 
more, beginning Monday, October 15th, at 3:00 p.m. in 
Room 202 Biological Sciences Building. The seminars 
are: 

1. "The Role and Legal Status of the Independent 
Contractor in Forestry Operations" (Monday, 
October 15th). 

2. "Anti-Trust Considerations in the Forest Prod- 
ucts Industry" (Tuesday, October 16th). 

3. "The Forester as an Expert Witness" (Wednes- 
day, October 17th). 

All interested persons are invited to attend. 



UNIVERSITY REVIEW COMMITTEE ON 

THE USE OF HUMAN SUBJECTS IN 

NON-MEDICAL RESEARCH 

1979-1980 

The University Review Committee on the Use of 
Human Subjects in Non-Medical Research will meet 
on the third Monday of every month to review re- 
search proposals involving human subjects. All ma- 
terials (copy of proposal, completed protocol and 
completed federal forms, if applicable) must be sub- 
mitted to the committee secretary, Robert Sawyer, 215 
Allen Building, by noon on the Wednesday preceding 
the regular meeting. Copies of the approval protocol, 
statement of assurance of compliance with the De- 
partment of Health, Education and Welfare policy for 
the protection of human subjects, and the implement- 
ing guidelines are available in the offices of de- 
partmental chairmen or in 215 Allen Building. Meet- 
ings will be held at 3:30 p.m. in the Board Room of 
Allen Building. 

The specific meeting dates and deadline for submis- 
sion of materials are as follows: 





Deadline for 


Meeting Dale 


Submission of Materials 


October 15 


October 10 


November 19 


November 14 


December 17 


December 12 


January 21 


January 16 


February 18 


February 13 


March 17 


March 12 


April 21 


April 16 


May 19 


May 14 


June 16 


June 11 


July 21 


July 16 


August 18 


August 13 



Materials submitted after the deadline will be re- 
viewed at the next meeting. 



Anthropology 

Education 

Law 

Political 

Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Public 

Member 

Student 

Member 

University 

Counsel 



Membership 
Member Alternate 

Prof. Richard G. Fox Prof. William O'Barr 
Prof. David Martin Prof. Robert Sawyer, Sec. 

Chin. Deborah DeMott Prof. Sara Beale 

Prof. David Paletz Prof. Ronald Rogowski 

Prof. Lloyd Borstelmann Prof. Susan Roth 
Prof. Richard Campbell Prof. Kurt Back 



Rev. Robert Wallace 
Ms. Claudia Hokanson 
Ms. Corinne Houpt 



Rev. William Smith 
Mr. David Meriwether 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, October 15th, at 4:15 p.m., in Room 111 of 
the Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Samuel S. 
Sweet, University of California, Santa Barbara, will 
speak on "Parallel and convergent evolution in Texas 
cave salamanders." Coffee and tea will be served at 
4:00 p.m. 



MANGROVE RETURNS TO DUKE 
October 15-20 
Mangrove, a San Francisco Men's Performance 
Collective, which conducted a highly-successful 
three-day residency last Spring through the auspices of 
the Duke Dance Program, returns this Fall for a full 
week. Their activities will again include teaching and a 
performance. The Duke Dance Program wishes to 
make the Mangrove residency available to everyone. 
(Contact Improvisation embraces people from a vari- 
ety of backgrounds: counsellors, carpenters, 
sociologists, artists, dancers, and business people.) All 
interested persons are invited to participate in the 
classes: 



Mon., Oct. 15-Wed., Oct. 17 
Mon., Oct. 15 & Wed., Oct. 17 
Tues., Oct. 16 & Thurs., Oct. 18 
Jam Session: 
Sat., Oct. 20 



4:30-7:00 p.m. 
7:30-10:00 p.m. 
1:45-3:00 p.m. 

11:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. 



On Thursday, October 18th, at 8:00 p.m., Mangrove 
will present its improvisational performance. Tickets, 
priced at $1.50 for students and senior citizens and 
$3.00 for others, will be available only at the door. All 
events for this residency will take place in The Ark, 
East Campus. Further information is available from 
Donald or Corbeau Blumenfeld-Jones, 684-6393; 489- 
9449. 

Mangrove is an improvisational company: "... the 
audience discovers the evening's dynamics in the same 
ongoing moment as the performers." Their "commit- 
ment is to a process of creative interaction; each per- 
formance (is) a realization of a moment in that pro- 
cess." Their central movement focus is on Contact 
Improvisation. This form "is based on physical laws 
which govern the flow of bodies in contact. The form 
involves two or more movers following a common path 
of least resistance and sharing information about each 
other's activities through a point of physical contact. 
Accommodation and support are achieved through a 
continual process of yielding and resisting. This pro- 
cess leads to an involvement in intuitive body language 
and spontaneous expression." Mangrove has existed 
for five years, giving nearly five hundred performances 
in that time. They have toured coast-to-coast and in 
Canada several times, receiving great critical acclaim 
and excellent reviews from the New York Times, the 
San Francisco area papers, the Vancouver, B. C, 
press, and many others. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS AND 
EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Dr. Janis Antonovics, Professor, Department of 
Botany, will present a seminar entitled "The Revival 
of the Phytometer Method in Ecology and Genetics" 
on Tuesday, October 16th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 130 
Biological Sciences Building. 

POLICY SCIENCES 

AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURE 

THE HON. WILLIAM RODGERS, MP 

The Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs 
and the Duke Colloquia on Comparative Policymaking 



will sponsor a lecture on Tuesday, October 16th, at 
3:00 p.m. in Room 204 Perkins Library. The Honora- 
ble William Rodgers, Member of Parliament, Great 
Britain, Principal Opposition Spokesman for Defense, 
will speak on "Government and Parliament — Adapting 
to Change." Dr. Joel L. Fleishman, Director of the 
Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs, will 
serve as moderator. The public is invited. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Pharmacology, with a Phar- 
macological Sciences Training Grant, will sponsor a 
seminar featuring Dr. E. Leong Way, Professor of 
Pharmacology, University of California at San Fran- 
cisco, on Tuesday, October 16th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. Dr. Way's topic will 
be "Role of Calcium in Opiate-Induced Analgesia, 
Tolerance and Physical Dependence." Coffee will be 
served at 3:45 p.m. in the lobby. 

DFCANP ENERGY SEMINAR 
CANCER AND NUCLEAR POWER 

The energy seminar of the Duke Faculty Committee 
on Alternatives to Nuclear Power will feature a discus- 
sion of "Radiation Health Effects of Nuclear Power" 
by pharmacologist Joe Graedon. The meeting at 7:00 
p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 16th, in Room 139 Social Sci- 
ences Building is open to all concerned members of the 
Duke Community. Refreshments will be served. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION/KDP 
LUNCHEON SYMPOSIUM 

The Department of Education and KDP will sponsor 
a luncheon symposium with Dr. Mary Mayesky, De- 
partment of Education, on Wednesday, October 17th, 
at 12:30 p.m. in Room 202 West Duke Building. Dr. 
Mayesky' s topic will be "Day Care in the Public 
Schools: An Emerging Concept." 

DEPARTMENT OF 
POLITICAL SCIENCE LECTURE 

The Department of Political Science will sponsor 
Dr. Ole R. Holsti, Duke University, as colloquia 
speaker on Wednesday, October 17th, at 1:00 p.m. in 
Room 307 Perkins Library. Dr. Holsti's topic will be 
"The Lessons of Vietnam and American Foreign Pol- 
icy." 

FORESTRY AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 
EXPERT WITNESS DEMONSTRATION 

The School of Forestry and Environmental Studies 
will present a demonstration of foresters as expert wit- 
nesses in the Moot Court Room of the Law School 
Thursday, October 18th, at 3 p.m. Ernest C. Hornsby 
and James M. Sizemore, Jr., attorneys, will examine 
forest appraisers in a condemnation proceedings. The 
demonstration is being held in conjunction with an in- 
tensive course on forest appraisal being taught in the 
school during the week. The public is invited. 



A.I.A./DUKE CENTER 
FOR JUDAIC STUDIES LECTURE 

The North Carolina Society of the Archaeological 
Institute of America and the Duke Center for Judaic 
Studies will sponsor a lecture: "Jerusalem in the Light 
of the City of David Excavations," on Thursday, Oc- 
tober 18th, 7:45 p.m. in York Chapel (2nd floor Gray 
Building — West Campus). Professor Yigael Shiloh of 
the Hebrew University and director of the excavation 
will present color slides of his recent work. The public 
is cordially invited. 

DUKE PLAYERS OPEN 50TH SEASON 
WITH SHAKESPEARE 

Duke Players opens its Fiftieth Anniversary season 
with a production of William Shakespeare's As You 
Like It. The classic comedy is scheduled for eight 
performances in Branson Theatre: Thursday-Sunday, 
October 18th-21st; Thursday-Sunday, October 25th- 
28th, at 8:15 p.m. Directed by Richard Aumiller, with 
settings by Ron Regier and costumes by Doreen Wet- 
zel, the production requires a cast of 18 Duke students 
in 22 different roles and the efforts of all the Duke 
Drama Program staff. 

Set largely in the fanciful forest of Arden, the play's 
heroine, Rosalind, follows her father into exile, dis- 
guised as a man for her protection. Accompanied by 
her cousin, Celia, and the court jester, Touchstone, 
she meets her lover, Orlando, and utilizes her man's 
disguise to test his love. Three other sets of lovers 
provide a full spectrum of commentary on the virtues 
and vices of love. While creating a comedy of amuse- 
ment and laughter, Shakespeare also crafted a classic 
treatise on the human pursuit of ever-illusive happi- 
ness. 

Tickets are priced at $4.00, Center Section: $3.00, 
Side Sections, and $2.50 for all Thursday evening 
seats. Tickets may be purchased now at Page Box Of- 
fice, or by calling 684-3227 for Master Charge or Visa 
sales by phone, 10:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m. Branson Theatre 
is a 150-seat theatre; group sales have already reduced 
the number of available tickets. Regular patrons are 
urged to buy their tickets early to avoid disappoint- 
ment. 

WOMEN'S HEALTH PROGRAM 

The Women's Health Program will sponsor a 
lecture/discussion on "Menstrual Cramps: Their Re- 
lief through Hypnosis" on Friday, October 19th, in 
Room 226 Perkins Library at 12:00 noon. 

BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

The Department of Biochemistry will sponsor a 
seminar with Dr. Nancy Kleckner, Professor of 
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Harvard Uni- 
versity, on Friday, October 19th, at 12:30 p.m. in 
Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. Dr. Kleckner's 
topic will be "Transposable Drug Resistance Elements 
in Bacteria." Coffee will be served in the lobby at 
12:15 p.m. 



PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

A plant ecology seminar, sponsored by the Depart- 
ment of Botany, will be held Friday, October 19th, at 
12:30 p.m. in Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 
John Horn, a graduate student in the department, will 
speak on "Death Throes of a Giant: A History of the 
American Chestnut." 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 
ALUMNI WEEKEND 

The Engineering Alumni Association will present a 
colloquium entitled "Computers Improving the Qual- 
ity of Your Life" on Friday, October 19th, at 1:30 p.m. 
in the Engineering Building Auditorium (Room 125). 
Medical and business leaders, as well as academic ex- 
perts, will speak on computer application to engineer- 
ing, medical diagnosis, and government and business 
problem-solving. Computer teaching capabilities and 
home management configurations will also be pre- 
sented. The colloquium will furnish a personal com- 
puter experience, including a "hands-on" use of the 
IBM 5100 for conversation, graphics and games. The 
University community is invited. 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. J. M. McBride from Yale University will pre- 
sent a seminar entitled "ESR and Rearrangements of 
Organic Triplets in Pure Solids" on Friday, October 
19th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 103 Gross Chemical Lab. 
Refreshments will be served in the Lobby at 3:10 p.m. 

MURRAY PERAHIA AT DUKE 
DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 

It is not every year that an artist with the busy 
schedule and the extraordinary talent of Murray 
Perahia can be enticed to a university campus for five 
days. Long-range planning plus two previous visits to 
Duke and a great friendship with Professor Allan Bone 
at Marlboro have persuaded this leading young Ameri- 
can pianist to accept the invitation of the Duke Artists 
Series to inaugurate its Fiftieth Anniversary season. It 
is interesting to note that fifty years ago the artist to 
initiate the Duke Artists Series was Ignace 
Paderewski. Murray Perahia has made the kind of im- 
pact on the international music scene that comes only 
once in a decade. At 25, he became the first American 
to win the Leeds International Pianoforte Competi- 
tion. In that same year, 1972, he became the first 
pianist in almost ten years to be signed to an exclusive 
contract by Columbia Records. Each of his releases 
for Columbia has been selected "Best of the Year" in 
the solo piano category, or he has received similar 
recognition. He began giving recitals in New York as 
winner of the Young Concert Artists Award and the 
Kosciusko Chopin Prize and in the Metropolitan 
Museum's Introduction Series. At 19 he performed at 
the Marlboro Music Festival in Vermont with musi- 
cians such as Casals and Serkin. He has performed in 
all the major music capitals of the United States, 



Europe, Israel, and Japan. Murray Perahia will present 
his recital on Friday, October 19th, at 8:15 p.m. in 
Page Auditorium. Remaining tickets for this perfor- 
mance are priced at $4.50 and $3.50 and are available 
at Page Box Office. 
The program follows: 



Sonata No. 11 in Bb, Op. 22 

Allegro can brio 

Adagio can molto espressione 

Menuetto 

Rondo, Allegretto 
Fantasiestucke 

I. Das Abends 

II. Aufschwung 

III. Warum? 

IV. Grillen 

V. In der Nacht 

VI. Fabel 

VII. Traumeswirren 

VIII. Ende vom Lied 
Suite, Opus 14 

Allegretto 
Scherzo 
Allegro molto 
Sostenuto 
Fantasy in F minor 
Berceuse 
Barcarolle 



Beethoven 



Chopin 



CONCERT OF CHAMBER MUSIC 

Joining the Duke Artists Series in presenting this 
brilliant pianist is the Chamber Arts Society, which 
will present Murray Perahia with the Ciompi Quartet 
of Duke University on Saturday, October 20th, in the 
East Duke Building Music Room at 8:15 p.m. Tickets 
for this performance, priced at $6.00, will be on sale at 
the door, starting at 7:30 p.m. Members of the Ciompi 
Quartet are: Giorgio Ciompi, Violin; Claudia Erdberg, 
Violin: George Taylor, Viola, and Frederic Raimi, 
Cello. 

The program follows: 

Piano Quintet in g minor, K. 478 W. A. Mozart 

Allegro 

Andante 

Rondo: Allegro 
String Quartet in g minor. Opus 10 

Anime et tres decide 

Assez vif et bien rythme 

Andantino, doucement expressif 

Tres modere: tres mouvemente et avec passion 
Piano Quintet in A, Opus 81 

Allegro, ma non tanto 

Dumka: Andante con moto 

Scherzo (Furiant): Molto vivace 

Finale: Allegro 



DUKE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

To conclude his multiple performances, Murray 
Perahia will play the Mozart Piano Concert No. 24 in C 
minor with the 81-member Duke Symphony Orchestra 
on Monday, October 22nd, at 8:15 p.m. in Page Au- 
ditorium. Tickets, priced at $4.50, $3.50, and $2.50, 



Claude Debussy 



Antonin Dvorak 



Tchaikovsky 

(1840-1893) 

Mozart 

(1756-1791) 



Brahms 
(1833-1897) 



are now available at Page Box Office. All seats are 
reserved. 

The complete program follows: 

"Romeo and Juliet" (1869) 

Overture-Fantasy 
Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor [K. 491] (1786) 

Allegro 

Larghetto 

Allegretto 

Mr. Perahia 
Symphony No. 1 in C minor. Opus 68 (1876) 

Un poco sostenuto— Allegro 

Andante sostenuto 

Un poco Allegretto e grazioso 

Adagio — piu Andante — Allegro non troppo 

Making all this extravagant fare possible is the su 
port in part of the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation | 
whom the campus and community tender continui 
thanks. 



ART MUSEUM 
PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT: JERUSALEM 

An exhibit of universal historical interest describing 
the conservation of Jerusalem's archeological past and 
the restoration of its civil and religious architectural 
heritage will be on view at the Duke Art Museum, East 
Campus. This photographic exhibit is open, free, to 
the public, October 22nd-30th. Museum hours are 
Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.; Saturday, 10:00. 
a.m. -1:00 p.m.; and Sunday, 2:00-5:00 p.m. 

SPECIAL NOTICE 
MEETING OF THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

The regular fall meeting of the University Faculty 
will be held on Tuesday, October 23rd, at 4:00 p.m. in 
the School of Engineering Auditorium. This will be a 
business meeting. Chancellor Pye will preside and give 
the report on the state of the University. Chairman 
Lawrence Evans will report on the activities and plans 
of the Academic Council. Immediately following the 
meeting, the faculty will be invited to adjourn to the 
Union Ballroom for a social hour at which cheese and 
wine will be served. 



OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 
MATH WORKSHOP 

"Fear of Figuring" is the title of a math workshop 
being offered to the public by the Duke University 
Office of Continuing Education. Meeting on Tuesday 
mornings, beginning October 23rd, the five week 
workshop will deal with a basic introduction to the 
"X"s and "Y"s of algebra. The course is intended to 
show that math without fear can be both fun and use- 
ful. 

Registration details may be obtained by calling 684- 
6259, or by writing to the Office of Continuing Educa- . 
tion, 107 Bivins, Duke University, Durham, N. C. 
27708. 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. James L. Ringo for the Ph.D. degree 
in Physiology was held on Fndas . October 12th. The subject of Mr. 
Ringo's dissertation was "Color and Acuity Vision in Cat Retinal 
Ganglion Cells.'' The committee conducting the examination con- 
sisted of Professors Myron Woibarsht, presiding; Nels Anderson, 
Lome Mendell, Robert Erickson and Joe Corless. 



The final examination of Mr. Thomas Floyd Johnson for the Ph.D. 
degree in Religion will be held on Monday. October 15th at 10:15 
a.m. in Room 210 Divinity School. The subject of Mr. Johnson's 



dissertation is "The Antitheses of the Elder: A Study of the Dualis- 
tic Languages of the Johannine Epistles." The committee to conduct 
the examination consists of Professors D. Moody Smith, presiding. 
W. D. Davies. J. L. Price. Edward Tiryakian. and John Schiiltz. 

The final examination of Ms. Elsa Ely Woods for the Ph.D. degree 
in Education will be held on Thursday, October 18th at 9:00 a.m. in 
Room 202 West Duke Building. The subject of Ms. Woods' disser- 
tation is "Effects of the Duke University Teaching of Writing Insti- 
tute on the Teaching of Writing in Selected Classes at Grades Five, 
Six, Eight, and Nine." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Anne H. Adams, presiding: Lucy Davis, 
Anne Flowers, Charles Hirschman, and Robert Sawyer. 






DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

calendar: 




October 21-28, 1979 



Volume 79 



Published October 19, 1979 



Number 8 



Sunday, October 21 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. HOMECOMING SUN- 
DAY. University Chapel. Preacher: The Rev. Dr. Leander 
Keck, Dean, Yale Divinity School. The Service of Worship is 
broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults, S3. 50; children under 12, '/2 price. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. SOCCER. Duke vs. N. C. State. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayer. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "THE WIZ." The movie 
version of the stage version of The Wizard of Oz- With Diana 
Ross as Dorothy movin' on down the Yellow Brick Road. 
Page. Aud. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: 'AS YOU LIKE IT." Branson Theatre. 
$4, $3. 

8:15 p.m. Informal Discussion with Murray Perahia. Rehearsal 
Hall, MDB Music Bldg. 

Monday, October 22 

October 22-24: The Divinity School Convocation and N. C. Pastors' 

School with the James A. Gray Lectures and Franklin S. 

Hickman Lectures. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:00 p.m. Convocation & Pastors' School Registration. Flowers 

Lounge. 
1:00-2:00 p.m. Luncheon session with Murray Perahia. E. Campus 

Union Ballroom. 
2:00 p.m. Convocation & Pastors' School Keynote Speaker: The 

Hon. Mark O. Hatfield (R-Oregon). Page Aud. 
4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Michael F. Corco- 
ran. Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
7:00 p.m. S. Asia Comparative Lecture. Speaker: Dr. Stewart 

Gordon. Center for International Studies. 
7:30 p.m. Official opening of "Jerusalem, Keeping the Past Alive" 

exhibit and reception. Art Museum, E. Campus. 
8:00 p.m. Convocation Service of Worship. Preacher: The Rev. 

Dr. David G. Buttrick. University Chapel. 
8:00 p.m. Art Gallery Talk About Paul Feiler's work. Speaker: 

Benjamen F. Williams, E. Gallery. 
8:15 p.m. D U. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with MURRAY 

PERAHIA. Page Aud. $4.50, $3.50. $2.50. 

Tuesday, October 23 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
11:00 a.m. Convocation & Pastors' School First Gray Lecture: The 

Rev. Dr. Leander E. Keck. Page Aud. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics & Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

W. D. Clayton. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Microbiology/Genetics Lecture. Speaker: Dr. 

David Hansman. Rm. 147 N. H. Duke Bldg. 
4:00 p.m. Dept. of Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Hum- 

berto Viveros. Rm. 147 N. H. Duke Bldg. 
4:00 p.m. FIELD HOCKEY: D. U. Women vs. Pfeiffer College. 
4:00 p.m. University Faculty Meeting. School of Engr. Aud. 
7:00, 9:00 & 11:00 p.m. Delta Sigma Phi Movie: "DIAMONDS 
ARE FOREVER." Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. $1.50. 



7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (Earlv German & French 
Cinema): "THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI." First 
major expressionist film. "Magician" Caligari forces hypno- 
tic victim to carry out evil bidding. Also, "Entr'acte," "Re- 
tour a la Raison." and "Emak Bakia." FREE TO 
EVERYONE. 

7:15 p.m. Convocation & Pastors' School First Hickman Lecture: 
The Rev. Dr. David G. Buttrick. Page Aud. 

8:00 p.m. Israeli Folk Dancing. 101 Union Bldg., W. Campus. 

8:30 p.m. Convocation & Pastors' School Second Gray Lecture: 
The Rev. Dr. Leander E. Keck. Page Aud. 

Wednesday, October 24 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
10:30 a.m. Convocation & Pastors' School Third Gray Lecture: The 

Rev. Dr. Leander E. Keck. Page Aud. 
11:30 a.m. Convocation & Pastors' School Second Hickman Lec- 
ture: The Rev. Dr. David G. Buttrick. Page Aud. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Chapel. 
3:00 p.m. Institute of Policy Sciences & Public Affairs. Speaker: 

Dr. Robert D. Reischauer. Rm. 204 Perkins Lib. 
7:00, 9:00 & 11:00 p.m. Mirecourt Movie: "THE RETURN OF 

THE PINK PANTHER." Bio. Sci. Aud. $1.00. 
7:45 p.m. Jerusalem Exhibit Lecture: Ya'akov Meshorer. Art 

Museum. 
8:15 p.m. Round Table on Science & Public Affairs. Speaker: The 

Hon. Harold Levanthal. Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. 
8:30 p.m. D. U. U. Broadway at Duke: "CHICAGO." Page Aud. 
$9.50, $8.50. $7.50. 

Thursday, October 25 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. York Chapel. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (American Films of 1939 Series): 

"WUTHERING HEIGHTS." The Bronte classic set in the 

Yorkshire moors — with Laurence Olivier as Heathcliff. 

Merle Oberon as Cathy, and David Niven. Also, "Popeye 

Meets Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp." Bio. Sci. Aud. 

Free, D. U. undergrads w I.D.'s; SI. 50. others. 
7:30 p.m. Triangle Dance Guild: ALVIN AILEY LECTURE/ 

DEMONSTRATION. Page Aud. $1. 
7:30 p.m. Jerusalem Film. Soc./Psy. Bldg.. Rm. 126. 
8:00 p.m. Comparative Lit. Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Theo. Ziol- 

kowski. Rm. 226 Perkins Lib. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "AS YOU LIKE IT." Branson Theatre. 

All Seats. $2.50. 

Friday, October 26 

Oct. 26-Oct. 28 PARENTS' Weekend. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open 
12:00 noon-5:00 p.m. Parents' Weekend Registration. Flowers 

Lounge. Union Bldg. W. Campus. 
12:00 noon. Women's Health Program Lecture and Discussion. 

Rm. 226 Perkins Lib. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Dept. of Botany Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Re- 
becca Burchell. Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, of D. U. Prayers. York Chapel. 
2:00 p.m. Phi Kappa Psi Celebrity Auction for Children's Cancer 

Research. Residential Quad (W. Campus) 
3:00 p.m. FIELD HOCKEY. D. U. Women vs. Catawba College. 



4:30-6:00 p.m. Chancellor's Reception for Parents, their Duke stu- 
dents, and other Parents' Weekend guests. S. Dining Hall, E. 
Campus Union. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. midnight. Freewater Film (Friday Night Series): 
"CITIZEN KANE.'' Cinematic achievement written, di- 
rected, produced, and performed by Orson Welles, who stars 
as newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane. Bio. Sci. Aud. 
Free, D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s; $1.50, others. 

7:00 p.m. Jerusalem Shabbat Service. E. Campus Center. 

8:00 p.m. Triangle Dance Guild presents ALVIN AILEY REP- 
ERTORY ENSEMBLE. Page Aud. $6 Gen. Pub. $5, Stu./65 
and over. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players present "AS YOU LIKE IT." Branson 
Theatre. $4, $3. 

Saturday, October 27 

9:00 a.m. -12:00 noon. Parents' Weekend Registration. 
10:00 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
10:00 a.m. FIELD HOCKEY: D. U. Women vs. N. C. Club. 
10:00 a.m. Parents' opportunity to meet with administrative officers 

and advisors. 
11:00 a.m. SOCCER: Duke vs. Maryland. 
1:00 p.m. Photography Workshop. Crafts Center, Southgate Dorm 

(E. Campus). 
1:30 p.m. FOOTBALL. Duke vs. U. of MD. W. W. Stadium. 
5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
6:00 p.m. Parents' Weekend Dinner. Great Hall (Dining Room), 

W. Campus. $8/person. Advance reservations required. 
7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "THE INVASION OF 
THE BODY SNATCHERS." Pod people invade San Fran- 
cisco. Remake of sci-fi classic. Donald Sutherland, Leonard 
Nimoy, Brooke Adams. Page Aud. SI. 50. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players present "AS YOU LIKE IT." Branson 
Theatre. $4. $3. 

Sunday, October 28 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

9:30 a.m. Hillel Parents' Weekend Brunch. Art Museum. Guests, 

S3; Hillel affiliates. $2.50. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. PARENTS' 
WEEKEND. University Chapel. Preacher: The Rev. Mr. 
Robert T. Young, Minister to the University. The Service of 
Worship is broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30-1:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Adults. S3. 50; children under 12, Vi price. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

4:00 p.m. Joint Benefit Concert by the Durham Civic Choral Soci- 
ety and the N. C. Chamber Players. Baldwin Aud. $5. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayer. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "THE INVASION OF 
THE BODY SNATCHERS." Page Aud. $1.50. 

8:00 p.m. Duke Republicans sponsor Rep. Pete McCloskey. Gross 
Chem. Lab. Aud. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players present "AS YOU LIKE IT." Branson 
Theatre. $4, S3. 

8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music Faculty Recital: WAYNE LAIL. 
Baritone. EDMR. Free. 



DUKE PLAYERS OPEN 50TH SEASON 
WITH SHAKESPEARE 

Duke Players opens its Fiftieth Anniversary season 
with a production of William Shakespeare's As You 
Like It. The classic comedy is scheduled for eight 
performances in Branson Theatre: Thursday-Sunday, 
October 18th-21st; Thursday-Sunday, October 25th- 
28th. at 8:15 p.m. Directed by Richard Aumiller, with 
settings by Ron Regier and costumes by Doreen Wet- 
zel, the production requires a cast of 18 Duke students 



in 22 different roles and the efforts of all the Duke 
Drama Program staff. 

Set largely in the fanciful forest of Arden, the play's 
heroine, Rosalind, follows her father into exile, dis- 
guised as a man for her protection. Accompanied by 
her cousin, Celia, and the court jester, Touchstone, 
she meets her lover, Orlando, and utilizes her man's 
disguise to test his love. Three other sets of lovers 
provide a full spectrum of commentary on the virtues 
and vices of love. While creating a comedy of amuse- 
ment and laughter, Shakespeare also crafted a classic 
treatise on the human pursuit of ever-illusive happi- 
ness. 

Tickets are priced at $4.00, Center Section; $3.00, 
Side Sections, and $2.50 for all Thursday evening 
seats. Tickets may be purchased now at Pag^ Box Of- 
fice, or by calling 684-3227 for Master Charge or Visa 
sales by phone, 10:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m. Branson Theatre 
is a 150-seat theatre; group sales have already reduced 
the number of available tickets. Regular patrons are 
urged to buy their tickets early to avoid disappoint- 
ment. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham. N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham. NC 27706: telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of October 28th- 
November 4th is Monday. October 22nd, before 
3:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available from Flowers Information Desk. 






INFORMAL DISCUSSIONS WITH 
MURRAY PERAHIA 

Murray Perahia will meet informally with interested 
students and music faculty during his residence at 
Duke. On Sunday. October 21st, he will discuss "The 
Shaping of an Interpretation" during a Chopin perfor- 
mance practice in the Rehearsal Hall, Mary Duke Bid- 
die Music Building, at 8:15 p.m. On Monday, October 
22nd, he will be available during a luncheon session, 
1:00-2:00 p.m., in the East Campus Union Ballroom. 
Interested persons are asked to sign-up for this meet- 
ing in the Music Office, Room 105. 

MURRAY PERAHIA AT DUKE 
DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 

It is not every year that an artist with the busy 
schedule and the extraordinary talent of Murray 
Perahia can be enticed to a university campus for five 
days. Long-range planning plus two previous visits to 
Duke and a great friendship with Professor Allan Bone 
at Marlboro have persuaded this leading young Ameri- 
can pianist to accept the invitation of the Duke Artists 
Series to inaugurate its Fiftieth Anniversary season. It 
is interesting to note that fifty years ago the artist to 
initiate the Duke Artists Series was Ignace 
Paderewski. Murray Perahia has made the kind of im- 
pact on the international music scene that comes only 
once in a decade. At 25, he became the first American 
to win the Leeds International Pianoforte Competi- 
tion. In that same year, 1972, he became the first 
pianist in almost ten years to be signed to an exclusive 
contract by Columbia Records. Each of his releases 
for Columbia has been selected "Best of the Year" in 
the solo piano category, or he has received similar 
recognition. He began giving recitals in New York as 
winner of the Young Concert Artists Award and the 
Kosciusko Chopin Prize and in the Metropolitan 
Museum"s Introduction Series. At 19 he performed at 
the Marlboro Music Festival in Vermont with musi- 
cians such as Casals and Serkin. He has performed in 
all the major music capitals of the United States. 
Europe, Israel, and Japan. Murray Perahia will present 
his recital on Friday, October 19th, at 8:15 p.m. in 
Page Auditorium. Remaining tickets for this perfor- 
mance are priced at $4.50 and S3. 50 and are available 
at Page Box Office. 

The program follows: 
Sonata No. 1 1 in Bb, Op. 22 Beethoven 

Allegro can brio 

Adagio can molto espressione 

Menuetto 

Rondo, Allegretto 
Fantasiestucke Schumann 

I. Das Abends 

II. Aufschwung 

III. Warum? 

IV. Grillen 

V. In der Nacht 

VI. Fabel 

VII. Traumeswirren 

VIII. Ende vom Lied 



Suite. Opus 14 

Allegretto 

Scherzo 

Allegro molto 

Sostenuto 
Fantasy in F minor 

Berceuse 

Barcarolle 



Chopin 



CONCERT OF CHAMBER MUSIC 

Joining the Duke Artists Series in presenting this 
brilliant pianist is the Chamber Arts Society, which 
will present Murray Perahia with the Ciompi Quartet 
of Duke University on Saturday. October 20th. in the 
East Duke Building Music Room at 8:15 p.m. Tickets 
for this performance, priced at $6.00, will be on sale at 
the door, starting at 7:30 p.m. Members of the Ciompi 
Quartet are: Giorgio Ciompi. Violin; Claudia Erdberg, 
Violin: George Taylor, Viola, and Frederic Raimi, 
Cello. 

The program follows: 
Piano Quintet in g minor. K. 478 W. A. Mozart 

Allegro 

Andante 

Rondo: Allegro 
String Quartet in g minor. Opus 10 Claude Debussy 

Anime et tres decide 

Assez vif et bien rythme 

Andantino. doucement expressif 

Tres modere: tres mouvemente et avec passion 

Piano Quintet in A, Opus 81 Antonin Dvorak 

Allegro, ma non tanto 
Dumka: Andante con moto 
Scherzo (Furiant): Molto vivace 
Finale: Allegro 



DUKE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

To conclude his multiple performances, Murray 
Perahia will play the Mozart Piano Concert No. 24 in C 
minor with the 81 -member Duke Symphony Orchestra 
on Monday, October 22nd, at 8:15 p.m. in Page Au- 
ditorium. Tickets, priced at $4.50, $3.50, and $2.50, 
are now available at Page Box Office. All seats are 
reserved. 

The complete program follows: 

"Romeo and Juliet" (1869) Tchaikovsky 

Overture-Fantasy (1840-1893) 

Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor [K. 491) (1786) Mozart 

Allegro (1756-1791) 

Larghetto 

Allegretto 

Mr. Perahia 
Symphony No. 1 in C minor. Opus 68 (1876) Brahms 

Un poco sostenuto — Allegro ( 1 833- 1 897) 

Andante sostenuto 

Un poco Allegretto e grazioso 

Adagio — piu Andante — Allegro non troppo 

Making all this extravagant fare possible is the sup- 
port in part of the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation to 
whom the campus and community tender continuing 
thanks. 



THE DIVINITY SCHOOL CONVOCATION 
AND THE N. C. PASTORS" SCHOOL 

W/JAMES A. GRAY LECTURES 
FRANKLIN S. HICKMAN LECTURES 

The annual Convocation and Pastors' School to be 
held Monday, October 22nd-Wednesday, October 
24th, is a Continuing Education service of The Divinity 
School of Duke University, aided by the Alumni As- 
sociation and Office of Alumni Affairs, together with 
the Board of Managers of the North Carolina Pastors' 
School, representing the North Carolina and Western 
North Carolina Conferences of The United Methodist 
Church, and with the sanction of the Division of Or- 
dained Ministry, Board of Higher Education and 
Ministry. Ministers and interested lay persons of vari- 
ous churches and academic background and members 
of the Durham and Duke University community are 
welcome to the public lectures, workshops, and ser- 
vice of worship. 

The schedule follows: 

Monday, October 22 

12:00 P.M. — Registration: For Workshops, Alumni Occasions, and 

Tickets. Flowers Building Lounge. 
2:00 P.M.— Keynote Address: Senator Mark O. Hatfield. Page 

Auditorium. 
3:30 P.M. — Bishops' Forum: Bishops L. Scott Allen and Robert 

M. Blackburn. Page Auditorium. 
5:30 P.M.— Dinner for Reunion Classes of 1934, 1939, 1944, 

1949, 1954, 1959, 1964, 1969, 1974. Divinity School. 
5:30 P.M. — Dinner for Speakers, Staff, and Board of Managers. 

Divinity School. 
8:00 P.M. — Convocation Service of Worship: The Reverend Dr. 

David G. Buttrick, Preacher. Duke University Chapel. 

Tuesday, October 23 

9:00 A.M. — Workshops on the Responsible Church. First Ses- 
sion. 
10:30 A.M. — Break Period for Refreshments. Transitions. 
11:00 A.M. — First Gray Lecture: The Reverend Dr. Leander E. 

Keck. Page Auditorium. 
12:30 P.M. — Alumni Association Luncheon: The Reverend 
O. Richard Bowyer, President. Dean Thomas A. Langford. Union 
Ballroom. 

3:00 P.M. — Workshops on the Responsible Church. Second Ses- 
sion. 

7:15 P.M. — First Hickman Lecture: The Reverend Dr. David G. 
Buttrick. Page Auditorium. 

8:30 P.M. — Second Gray Lecture: The Reverend Dr. Leander E. 
Keck. Page Auditorium. 

Wednesday, October 25 

9:00 A.M.— Workshops on the Responsible Church. Third Ses- 
sion. 
10:30 A.M.— Third Gray Lecture: The Reverend Dr. Leander 

E. Keck. Page Auditorium. 
11:30 A.M. — Second Hickman Lecture: The Reverend Dr. David 
G. Buttrick. Page Auditorium. 

1:00 P.M. — Luncheon: Board of Managers of the North Carolina 
Pastors' School. Old Trinity Room. 

The keynote speaker, U. S. Senator Mark O. Hat- 
field (R-Oregon), is a leading Christian layman and the 
author of numerous articles for religious publications 
and of three books. The James A. Gray Lecturer, The 
Reverend Dr. Leander E. Keck, is Dean and Professor 
of New Testament, Yale Divinity School. The 
Franklin S. Hickman Lecturer- Preacher is the Rev- 



erend Dr. David G. Buttrick, Professor of Homiletics, 
St. Meinrad School of Theology, Indiana. The speak- 
ers and their topics are: 

The Keynote Speaker — Senator Mark O. Hatfield, on Christian Re- 
sponsibility in Public Affairs. 
The James A. Gray Lecturer — Dean Leander E. Keck, three lec- 
tures on The Freedom of God: Reflections on Romans. 
The Franklin S. Hickman Lecturer-Preacher — Dr. David G. But- 
trick, on Principalities and Powers: 
Sermon, "Not Flesh and Blood." 
First Lecture, "The Powers That Be, Revisited." 
Second Lecture, "Preaching to the Powers." 

Five workshops on Christian Social Responsibility 
will also be held. The major theme feature of the Con- 
vocation and Pastors' School this year — in lectures, 
preaching, forum, and workshops — is the social re- 
sponsibility of churches and Christians. The work- 
shops are planned to give registrants the opportunity 
to meet with outstanding representatives of several 
different Christian communions, institutions, and per- 
spectives. The workshops, their leaders, and 
schedules are: 

I. Dr. Bruce Birch: Old Testament Images for a Prosperous 
Church— 

1. "A Theology of Serving and a Theology of Blessing" 

(Tuesday, 9-10:30 A.M.) 

2. "The Image of Exile and the Modern Church" 

(Tuesday, 3-5 P.M.) 
II. Bishop F. Joseph Gossman: A Roman Catholic Perspec- 
tive — In View of'Puebla" and "Redemptor Hominis" 
(Tuesday, 3-5 P.M.) 
HI. The Reverends Mernie King and Perk Perkins of Sojourners 
Community: An Evangelical Perspective — Let the Church Be 
the Church! 

(Tuesday, 3-5 P.M., and Wednesday, 9-10:15 A.M.) 
IV. Dr. Lois C. Miller: The Global Mission of the Church- 
Vision, Actualities, Challenges 

(Tuesday, 9-10:30 A.M. and 3-5 P.M.) 
V. Dr. H. Shelton Smith: How Well Are We Facing Our Respon- 
sibilities, After All These Years? 

(Tuesday, 9-10:30 A.M.. and Wednesday, 9-10:15 A.M.) 

A special feature of this Convocation and Pastors' 
School will be the Bishops' Forum with Bishop L. 
Scott Allen of the Charlotte Area and Bishop Robert 
M. Blackburn of the Raleigh Area of The United 
Methodist Church discussing "Social Issues Facing 
the 1980 General Conference"' and related topics. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, October 22nd at 4:15 p.m., in Room 111 
Biological Sciences Building. Michael F. Corcoran, 
Department of Zoology, will speak on "Morphological 
and Genetic Variation in Southeastern Bullhead Cat- 
fish." Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

SOUTH ASIA COMPARATIVE LECTURE 

Dr. Stewart Gordon, a University of Michigan Ph.D. 
now living in London and author of several articles on 
South Asia comparative studies, will give a lecture at 
the Center for International Studies, 2101 Campus 
Drive, at 7:00 p.m. on Monday October 22nd, on "Ad- 
versity and Recovery in Premodern Kingdoms: India 



and China." The talk, the first of the regular faculty 
seminars sponsored by the South Asia Committee, is 
open to the public. 



"JERUSALEM, KEEPING THE PAST ALIVE" 
AT MUSEUM OF ART 

"Jerusalem, Keeping the Past Alive," an exhibit 
jointly sponsored by Duke Hillel, Durham Hadassah 
and the Consul General of Israel of Atlanta, will be on 
display at the Duke Museum of Art on the Duke Uni- 
versity East Campus, from Monday, October 22nd 
through Sunday, October 28th. 

Since it's first walls were built about 4,000 years 
ago. Jerusalem has been continuously occupied. Over 
the centuries, many peoples lived and fought in the 

I city, and neighborhoods were built and destroyed. 
Monumental and splendid edifices of religious and 
secular powers were gradually added to the rich 
tapestry of the city; some were destroyed and buried 
under debris, while others survived and were in con- 
tinuous use for hundreds of years. 
Four major subjects compose the exhibition: (1) 

i conservation of archaeological sites; (2) treatment of 
historic open sites; (3) restoration and preservation of 

; neighborhoods; and (4) restoration of single structures. 
The exhibit may be viewed during regular Museum 
hours: weekdays 9-5, Saturday 10-2, and Sunday 1-4. 
There is no charge for admission. A schedule of related 
events is listed in the Calendar. A complete schedule 
follows: 

Monday, October 22 

7:30 p.m. Official opening of "Jerusalem, Keeping the Past Alive" 
exhibit, and reception. Special guest. Consul General of Is- 
rael. Duke Art Museum, East Campus. 

Tuesday, October 23 

8:00 p.m. Israeli folk dancing. Everyone welcome. 101 Union, 
D. U. West Campus. 

Wednesday, October 24 

7:45 p.m. Museum reception and lecture. "Jerusalem Temple Sym- 
bols and Jewish Aspirations" by visiting scholar Ya'akov 
Meshorer. Chief Curator of Archaeology in the Israel 
Museum, Jerusalem. Duke Art Museum, East Campus. 

Thursday, October 25 

7:30 p.m. Jerusalem Free Film Night. "Elie Wiesel's Jerusalem," 
followed by "I Love You Rosa," at 8:30 p.m. Soc/Psych. 
Rm. 126. D. U. West Campus. 

Friday, October 26 

7:00 p.m. Special Jerusalem Shabbat service. Followed by Oneg 
Shabbat. East Campus Center, D. U. East Campus. 

Sunday, October 28 

9:30 a.m. Parents Weekend bagels and lox brunch and viewing of 
exhibit, "Jerusalem, Keeping the Past Alive." Guests, $3.00; 
Hillel Affiliates. $2.50. Duke Art Museum. East Campus. 



ART MUSEUM 
PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT: JERUSALEM 

An exhibit of universal historical interest describing 
the conservation of Jerusalem's archeological past and 



the restoration of its civil and religious architectural 
heritage will be on view at the Duke Art Museum, East 
Campus. This photographic exhibit is open, free, to 
the public, October 22nd-30th. Museum hours are 
Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m.; Saturday, 10:00 
a.m.-l:00 p.m.; and Sunday, 2:00-5:00 p.m. 

ARTIST'S EXHIBITION 
PAUL FEILER 

On Monday, October 22nd, at 8:00 p.m. in East 
Gallery, Benjamen F. Williams, curator of the art gal- 
lery at North Carolina State University, will hold a 
gallery talk about Paul Feiler's work. Recent works by 
the contemporary British artist will be exhibited 
through November 14th. This exhibition, sponsored 
by the Duke University Union Galleries Committee, 
will include a series of large silk screen prints and 
smaller gouaches. Both forms explore the interaction 
of circle and line expressed in delicate hues. In addi- 
tion, some oil paintings from Feiler's earlier works of 
the 50s will be on display. The silk screen prints and 
the gouaches will be for sale through the Duke Union. 



OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 
MATH WORKSHOP 

"Fear of Figuring" is the title of a math workshop 
being offered to the public by the Duke University 
Office of Continuing Education. Meeting on Tuesday 
mornings, beginning October 23rd, the five week 
workshop will deal with a basic introduction to the 
"X"s and "Y"s of algebra. The course is intended to 
show that math without fear can be both fun and use- 
ful. 

Registration details may be obtained by calling 684- 
6259, or by writing to the Office of Continuing Educa- 
tion, 107 Bivins, Duke University, Durham, N. C. 
27708. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS AND 
EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Dr. W. D. Clayton of the Royal Botanic Gardens in 
Kew, England, will present a seminar entitled 
"Evolution in Grasses" on Tuesday, October 23rd, at 
12:30 p.m. in Room 130 Biological Sciences Building. 

MICROBIOLOGY/GENETICS LECTURE 

The Department of Microbiology and the University 
Program in Genetics will sponsor a seminar on Tues- 
day, October 23rd, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline 
H. Duke Building. Dr. David Hansman, Adelaide 
Children's Hospital, Adelaide, Australia, will speak on 
"Patterns of Drug Resistance in Pneumococcus." 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Pharmacology will sponsor a 
seminar with Humberto Viveros, M.D., of Burroughs 



Wellcome Company and Adjunct Associate Professor 
Department of Pharmacology on Tuesday, October 
23rd, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke 
Building. Dr. Viveros' topic will be "Co-Storage and 
Co-Secretion of Opiate-Like Peptides and 
Catecholamines from Adrenal Medulla." Coffee will 
be served in the lobby at 3:45 p.m. 

SPECIAL NOTICE 
MEETING OF THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

The regular fall meeting of the University Faculty 
will be held on Tuesday, October 23rd, at 4:00 p.m. in 
the School of Engineering Auditorium. This will be a 
business meeting. Chancellor Pye will preside and give 
the report on the state of the University. Chairman 
Lawrence Evans will report on the activities and plans 
of the Academic Council. Immediately following the 
meeting, the faculty will be invited to adjourn to the 
Union Ballroom for a social hour at which cheese and 
wine will be served. 

INSTITUTE OF POLICY SCIENCES 
AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPEAKER 

The Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs 
will sponsor Robert D. Reischauer as the third speaker 
in its colloquia series "The Fate of Social Programs in 
an Age of Fiscal Austerity" on Wednesday, October 
24th, at 3:00 p.m. in Room 204 Perkins Library. As the 
Deputy Director of the Congressional Budget Office, 
Dr. Reischauer works on problems of education, reve- 
nue sharing, welfare policies, and public finance. His 
topic will be "Entitlement Programs in the Era of 
Austerity." The public is invited to attend. 

ROUND TABLE ON SCIENCE AND 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURE 

The Honorable Harold Levanthal, Circuit Judge of 
the United States Court of Appeals for the District of 
Columbia Circuit, will speak on "Science Issues in the 
Court" on Wednesday, October 24th, at 8:15 p.m. in 
the Gross Chemical Laboratory Auditorium. Mr. Joel 
L. Fleishman, Professor of Law and Director of the 
Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs, will 
preside. The lecture is sponsored by the Round Table 
on Science and Public Affairs, and the public is cor- 
dially invited to attend. 

Members of the University community are invited to 
meet the Honorable Harold Levanthal and exchange 
views on the topic of the lecture at a coffee on Thurs- 
day, October 25th, between 10:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon 
in the Commons Room, Room 331 Sociology- 
Psychology Building. 

D. U. U. BROADWAY AT DUKE 
"CHICAGO" 

The Duke University Union Performing Arts Com- 
mittee presents Chicago, the second production in the 
1979-80 Broadway at Duke Series, on Wednesday, 



October 24th, at 8:30 in Page Auditorium. Remaining 
tickets, available at Page Box Office, are priced ati 
$8.50 and $7.50. A $2.00 discount is given to D. U. 
undergrads with picture I. D. and student enrollment 
card. Based on the actual account of one of the most 
sensational murder trials of the 1920's, Chicago is a 
musical which recaptures the corruption and dec- 
adence of prohibition-era Chicago and an atmosphere 
reminiscent of Brecht's Three Penny Opera and 
Cabaret. "Chicago is as dazzling a demonstration of. 
musical theatre as you're ever going to see on a 
Broadway stage. A tremendous accomplish- 
ment." — N. Y. Post. 

TRIANGLE DANCE GUILD 
ALVIN AILEY REPERTORY ENSEMBLE 

On Thursday, October 25th, an Alvin Ailey lecture/ 
demonstration will be held in Page Auditorium at 7:30 
p.m. Admission is $1.00, and tickets are available at 
the door. On Friday, October 26th, the Alvin Ailey 
Repertory Ensemble will perform in Page Auditorium 
at 8:00 p.m. Tickets, priced at $6.00 for the General 
Public and $5.00 for Students/65 and Over, are now on 
sale at Page Box Office. 

This superb group of young dancers has developed 
under the aegis of the famed Alvin Ailey American 
Dance Theater, and many of the dancers in the ensem- 
ble will go on to join the first company. The group is 
composed mainly of students from the Ailey School 
and come from varied backgrounds and locations. All 
are united by a strong belief in what they are doing, 
and all love to dance. These young dancers find the 
enormous variety of the Ailey repertory demanding 
and thus stimulating. They are "total dancers" — ones 
who are at home in jazz, ballet and modern. 

The Alvin Ailey Repertory Ensemble made its debut 
on a television special, "Ailey Celebrates Ellington," 
in which they premiered several new works for Ailey' s 
Ellington Festival at Lincoln Center. Two of the senior 
company's work from its current repertory were first 
performed on this program — The Mooche" and 
"Night Creature." 

Since then the Repertory Ensemble has been draw- 
ing critical and audience acclaim for performances 
throughout the United States and for appearances 
during the regular Ailey seasons in New York. Dance 
Magazine hailed the company as "Exciting" and went 
on to say, "It whips the audience into an enthusiastic 
frenzy the way the first company does." 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE LECTURE 
THEODORE ZIOLKOWSKI 

Theodore Ziolkowski, presently Dean of the 
Graduate School at Princeton, is one of Duke's most 
distinguished alumni in the field of literary studies. His 
A.M. thesis (1952) was entitled "Friedrich Holderlin's 
Translation of the Iliad," and has been followed by 
important work on the German novel and Hermann 
Hesse in particular. His writing has always been 
"comparatist" in range and depth; his essays illumi- 



, nate literature from witty and unexpected angles, 
while his books are comprehensive in scope: "Fic- 
tional Transfigurations of Jesus"' and, most recently, 
'"Disenchanted Images: A Literary Iconology" (1977). 
Prof. Ziolkowski will be giving a new lecture at Duke 

' on the literary images of the great scientific issues: 
"Frankenstein's Fraternity and The Ethics of Sci- 
ence. The Duke Comparative Literature Program 
welcomes everyone interested in this talk, which will 
be at 8 p.m. on Thursday, October 25th, in Room 226 
Perkins Library. 

PARENTS' WEEKEND 

Duke University Parents' Weekend will be held Fri- 
day, October 26th-Sunday, October 28th. Registration 
will be from 12:00 noon-5:00 p.m. Friday, October 
26th, in Flowers Lounge, Union Building, West Cam- 
pus, where a schedule of events will be available. 

WOMEN'S HEALTH PROGRAM 

On Friday. October 26th, at 12:00 noon the Wo- 
men's Health Program will sponsor a lecture and dis- 
cussion on 'Women and Drugs: Their Use and 
Abuse'' in Room 226 Perkins Library. Participants are 
asked to bring lunch to the meeting. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 
PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Botany will sponsor a plant 
ecology seminar on Friday, October 26th, at 12:30 
p.m. in Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. Re- 
becca Burchell, a graduate student in the department, 
will speak on "Nutrient Availability Following Fire in 
Pi'lchritudinous Pocosins." 

PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP 

The D. U. U. Crafts Center will sponsor a photog- 
raphy workshop on the Solarization process on Satur- 
day, October 27th, from 1:00-5:00 p.m. at the Crafts 
Center, Southgate Dorm, East Campus; tel. 684-6213, 
Monday-Friday, 3:00-6:00 p.m. 

CHAMBER PLAYERS/CHORAL SOCIETY 
BENEFIT CONCERT 

The North Carolina Chamber Players and the Dur- 
ham Civic Choral Society will perform together in the 
annual benefit concert on Sunday, October 28th, at 
4:00 p.m. in Baldwin Auditorium (East Campus). 
Tickets, now on sale at Page Box Office, are $5.00. 
Featured works will be Beethoven's Piano Concerto 
No. 3; Schubert's Mass in G Major, and the Bach 
Magnificat, conducted by Robert Porco, with John 
Ruggero, piano soloist. 



DUKE REPUBLICANS SPONSOR 
REP. McCLOSKEY 

The Duke Republicans will sponsor Representative 
Pete McCloskey on Sunday, October 28th, at 8:00 
p.m. in Gross Chemical Laboratory Auditorium. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC RECITAL 

The Duke University Department of Music will pre- 
sent Wayne Lail, baritone, and Kathryn Huestis, 
pianist, in recital on Sunday evening, October 28th, at 
8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. 

Wayne Lail, a member of the voice faculty in the 
Duke Music Department, is a graduate of Guilford 
College and the University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro. After graduate study at UNC-G, Mr. Lail 
studied in Munich, Germany, at. the Bayerische 
Hochschule fur Musik and with famed Danish tenor, 
Helge Roswaenge. In addition to having sung at the 
Bayerische Staatsoper, Mr. Lail has appeared as solo- 
ist with the Munchner Kammerchor, the Miinchner 
Bach Chor, and the Bayerische Rundfunk Chor. A 
Duke University voice faculty member for the past 
five years, Mr. Lail also serves as baritone soloist for 
Duke Chapel. This past summer he sang the role of the 
Commendatore in DON GIOVANNI which was one of 
four performances included in the Duke University 
1979 Opera Festival. 

Kathryn Huestis received her B.A. in music from 
Duke. She has studied piano with Ruth Friedberg and 
Ronald Fishbaugh and teaches piano privately, her- 
self. As an accompanist in the Duke Music Depart- 
ment, she has performed in student recitals and Opera 
Workshops. She has also performed in chamber music 
recitals with Dorothy Kitchen and art song recitals 
with Professor John Hanks and has acted as accom- 
panist for the Durham Civic Choral Society, the Duke 
Summer Theatre, and the Durham Savoyards. 

The program is principally comprised of art songs of 
Italian, German, French, and American origins. The 
public is invited. Admission is free. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

INFORMAL DISCUSSION SESSION 

FOR FACULTY 

On Tuesday, October 30th, Provost William Bevan 
and Chancellor A. Kenneth Pye will host an informal 
discussion session for members of the faculty. It will 
be held from 4:00-5:00 p.m. in the Commons Room of 
the Divinity School where coffee will be served. After 
the discussion, the group will adjourn to the Rare Book 
Room in Perkins Library for a sherry hour. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR 




Oct. 28-Nov. 4, 1979 



Vlume 79 



Published October 26, 1979 



Number 9 



Sunday, October 28 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

9:30 a.m. Hillel Parents' Weekend Brunch. Art Museum. Guests, 
$3; Hillel affiliates, $2.50. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. PARENTS' 
WEEKEND. University Chapel. Preacher: The Rev. Mr. 
Robert T. Young, Minister to the University. The Service of 
Worship is broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 

11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room. E. Cam- 
pus Union and in Oak Room, W. Campus. Open for faculty, 
staff, their families and guests. Wine service available after 
1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

4:00 p.m. Joint Benefit Concert by the Durham Civic Choral Soci- 
ety & the N. C. Chamber Players. Baldwin Aud. $5. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayer. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "THE INVASION OF 
THE BODY SNATCHERS." Pod people invade San Fran- 
cisco. Re-make of sci-fi classic. Leonard Nimoy, Brooke 
Adams, Donald Sutherland. Page Aud. $1.50. 

8:00 p.m. D. Republicans: Rep. Pete McCloskey. Gross Chem. 
Lab. Aud. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "AS YOU LIKE IT." Branson Theatre. 
$4, $3. 

8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music Faculty Recital: WAYNE LAIL. 
Baritone, EDMR. Free. 

Monday, October 29 

Oct. 29-Nov. 1: Registration for Spring Semester, 1980. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Geerat Vermeij. 

Rm. Ill, Bio. Sci. 
6:30 p.m. VOLLEYBALL: D. U. Women vs. E.C.U. 

Tuesday, October 30 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics/Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
James N. Siedow. Rm. 130, Bio. Sci. 

4:00 p.m. Faculty Discussion Session. Divinity School Commons 
Rm. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Pharmacology Seminar. Speakers: Dr. Jeffrey 
D. Lazar; Dr. A. Richard Whorton. Rm. 147, N. H. Duke. 

4:00 p.m. FIELD HOCKEY: D. U. Women vs. High Point Col- 
lege. 

4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Geerat Vermeij. 
Rm. Ill, Bio. Sci. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films (Early German & French 
Cinema): "NOSFERATU." First film version of Dracula. 
Plus, "Un Chien Andalou." Surrealist satire of avant-garde 
films. Free to everyone. Bio. Sci. 

7:30 p.m., 9:00, 10:30 p.m. & midnight. Phi Delta Theta Film: 
"THE GROOVE TUBE." Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music Faculty & Guest Recital: JUDY BE- 
NEDICT, Violin; JOHN RUGGERO, Piano. EDMR. Free. 

8:15 p.m. Black Student Alliance: DANCE BLACK INVITA- 
TIONAL CONCERT. Page Aud. 

Wednesday, October 31 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 



12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Dept. of Educ./KDP Luncheon Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

Peter Burch. Rm. 202, W. Duke Bldg. 
1:00 p.m. Pol. Sci. Colloquium. Speaker: Bruce M. Russett. Rm. 

307, Perkins. 
7:00 p.m. VOLLEYBALL: D. U. Women vs. N. C. State. 
8:15 p.m. Round Table on Science & Public Affairs. Speaker: Dr. 

Arthur Bueche. Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. 
Thursday, November 1 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:00 noon. Richard Reid, Pianist. Rehearsal Hall, BDB Music 

Bldg. Free. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. York Chapel. 
7:00 & 9:30 Freewater Films (DOUBLE FEATURE): "REEFER 
MADNESS." A 1936 film depicting the effects of the "un- 
speakable scourge ... the new drug menace" on the Ameri- 
can way of life. Also, "FREAKS." Midget falls in love with 
trapeze artist, who plots murder when she learns of his 
wealth. Banned for 30 years in Britain. Bio. Sci. Aud. Free. 
D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s; $1.50, others. 
8:15 p.m. Hoof 'n Horn: "LITTLE ME." Fred Theatre. $3.50. 

Friday, November 2 

Nov. 2-30: ART EXHIBITION: Nancy Tuttle May, Watercolors. 

W. Campus Gallery (Rm. 104, Flowers). 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:00 noon. Women's Health Program Lecture/Discussion. Rm. 

226, Perkins. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Dwight Billings. 

Rm. 144, Bio. Sci. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Argiris 

Efstratiadis. Rm. 147, N. H. Duke. 
1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, of D. U. Prayers. York Chapel. 
2:00 p.m. Final Examination for Ph.D. Candidate: John Patrick 

McDowell. Rm. 210, Divinity. 
3:30 p.m. Dept. of Chemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. J. Simons. 

Rm. 103, Gross Chem. 
7:00 p.m. & 12:00 midnight. Freewater Films (HORROR FILM 
DOUBLE FEATURE): 'NIGHT OF THE LIVING 
DEAD." Ghouls. 
9:30 p.m. & 2:00 a.m. "MARTIN." Vampire. Bio. Sci. Free. 

D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s; $1.50, others. 
8:15 p.m. Hoof n Horn: "LITTLE ME." Fred Theatre. $3.50. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "CHAMBER MUSIC;" "THIS IS THE 
RILL SPEAKING." Branson. $2. 

Saturday, November 3 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "THE LAST WAVE" 
("BLACK RAIN"). Lawyer has terrifying, prophetic vi- 
sions. Richard Chamberlain as modern man caught up in 
Aborigine tribal beliefs. Page Aud. $1.50. 

8:00 p.m. MODERN BLACK MASS CHOIR VARIETY SHOW. 
Baldwin. $1. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "CHAMBER MUSIC"; "THIS IS THE 
RILL SPEAKING." Branson. $2. 

8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music Faculty Recital: JOHN HANKS & 
FRIENDS— 25th Anniversary Concert. EDMR. Free. 



Sunday, November 4 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. All Saints' Day Service. 
University Chapel. Preacher: The Rev. Mr. Robert T. Young, 
Minister to the University. The Service of Worship is broad- 
cast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. (This sen'ice will be televised 
over WTVD. Ch. 11.) 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus Union and in Oak Room, W. Campus. Open for faculty, 
staff, their families, and guests. Wine Service available after 
1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

2:30 p.m. Hoof 'n Horn Matinee: "LITTLE ME." Fred Theatre. 
$3.50. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayer. 505 Alexander Ave. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Artists' Series: NICOLAI GEDDA. Met. Opera 
Tenor. Page Aud. $7, $6. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "CHAMBER MUSIC;" "THIS IS THE 
RILL SPEAKING." Branson. $2. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station. Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of November 4th- 1 lth 
is Monday, October 29th, before 3:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available from Flowers Information Desk. 



DUKE REPUBLICANS SPONSOR 
REP. McCLOSKEY 

The Duke Republicans will sponsor Representative 
Pete McCloskey on Sunday, October 28th, at 8:00 
p.m. in Gross Chemical Laboratory Auditorium. 



CHAMBER PLAYERS/CHORAL SOCIETY 
BENEFIT CONCERT 

The North Carolina Chamber Players and the Dur- 
ham Civic Choral Society will perform together in the 
annual benefit concert on Sunday, October 28th, at 
4:00 p.m. in Baldwin Auditorium (East Campus). 
Tickets, now on sale at Page Box Office, are $5.00. 
Featured works will be Beethoven's Piano Concerto 
No. 3; Schubert's Mass in G Major, and the Bach 
Magnificat, conducted by Robert Porco, with John 
Ruggero, piano soloist. 

DUKE PLAYERS OPEN 50TH SEASON 
WITH SHAKESPEARE 

Duke Players opens its Fiftieth Anniversary season 
with a production of William Shakespeare's As You 
Like It. The classic comedy is scheduled for eight 
performances in Branson Theatre: Thursday-Sunday, 
October 18th-21st; Thursday-Sunday. October 25th- 
28th. at 8:15 p.m. Directed by Richard Aumiller, with 
settings by Ron Regier and costumes by Doreen Wet- 
zel, the production requires a cast of 18 Duke students 
in 22 different roles and the efforts of all the Duke 
Drama Program staff. 

Set largely in the fanciful forest of Arden, the play's 
heroine, Rosalind, follows her father into exile, dis- 
guised as a man for her protection. Accompanied by 
her cousin, Celia, and the court jester. Touchstone, 
she meets her lover, Orlando, and utilizes her man's 
disguise to test his love. Three other sets of lovers 
provide a full spectrum of commentary on the virtues 
and vices of love. While creating a comedy of amuse- 
ment and laughter, Shakespeare also crafted a classic 
treatise on the human pursuit of ever-illusive happi- 
ness. 

Tickets are priced at $4.00, Center Section; $3.00, 
Side Sections, and $2.50 for all Thursday evening 
seats. Tickets may be purchased now at Page Box Of- 
fice, or by calling 684-3227 for Master Charge or Visa 
sales by phone, 10:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m. Branson Theatre 
is a 150-seat theatre; group sales have already reduced 
the number of available tickets. Regular patrons are 
urged to buy their tickets early to avoid disappoint- 
ment. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC RECITAL 

The Duke University Department of Music will pre- 
sent Wayne Lail, baritone, and Kathryn Huestis, 
pianist, in recital on Sunday evening, October 28th, at 
8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. 

Wayne Lail, a member of the voice faculty in the 
Duke Music Department, is a graduate of Guilford 
College and the University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro. After graduate study at UNC-G, Mr. Lail 
studied in Munich, Germany, at the Bayerische 
Hochschule fur Musik and with famed Danish tenor, 
Helge Roswaenge. In addition to having sung at the 
Bayerische Staatsoper, Mr. Lail has appeared as solo- 
ist with the Miinchner Kammerchor, the Miinchner 
Bach Chor, and the Bayerische Rundfunk Chor. A 












Duke University voice faculty member for the past 
five years, Mr. Lail also serves as baritone soloist for 
Duke Chapel. This past summer he sang the role of the 
Commendatore in DON GIOVANNI which was one of 
four performances included in the Duke University 
1979 Opera Festival. 

Kathryn Huestis received her B.A. in music from 
Duke. She has studied piano with Ruth Friedberg and 
Ronald Fishbaugh and teaches piano privately, her- 
self. As an accompanist in the Duke Music Depart- 
ment, she has performed in student recitals and Opera 
Workshops. She has also performed in chamber music 
recitals with Dorothy Kitchen and art song recitals 
with Professor John Hanks and has acted as accom- 
panist for the Durham Civic Choral Society, the Duke 
Summer Theatre, and the Durham Savoyards. 

The program is principally comprised of art songs of 
Italian, German, French, and American origins. The 
public is invited. Admission is free. 



INFORMAL DISCUSSION SESSION 
FOR FACULTY 

On Tuesday, October 30th, Provost William Bevan 
and Chancellor A. Kenneth Pye will host an informal 
discussion session for members of the faculty. It will 
be held from 4:00-5:00 p.m. in the Commons Room of 
the Divinity School where coffee will be served. After 
the discussion, the group will adjourn to the Rare Book 
Room in Perkins Library for a sherry hour. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS AND 
EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Dr. James N. Siedow, Assistant Professor, Depart- 
ment of Botany will present a seminar entitled "Some 
Thoughts on the Evolution of Photosynthesis*' on 
Tuesday, October 30th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 130 
Biological Sciences Building. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Pharmacology will sponsor a 
seminar on Tuesday, October 30th, at 4:00 p.m. in 
Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. Jeffrey David 
Lazar, M.D., and A. Richard Whorton, Ph.D., De- 
partment of Pharmacology, will speak on "Renal 
Prostaglandins." Coffee will be served in the lobby at 
3:45 p.m. 

ZOOLOGY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology, through The Cocos 
Foundation Training Grant in Morphology, will pre- 
sent two lectures by Dr. Geerat Vermeij, Department 
of Zoology, University of Maryland. On Monday, 
October 29th, at 4:15 p.m., Room 111 Biological Sci- 
ences Building, Dr. Vermeij will speak on "The 
Mesozoic Revolution in Snail Shell Architecture and 
Ecology." On Tuesday, October 30th, in Room 111 



Biological Sciences Building, Dr. Vermeij will speak 
on "The Mathematics and Utility of Unsuccessful 
Predation." Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 
on Monday only. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 
FACULTY-GUEST RECITAL 

On Tuesday, October 30th, at 8:15 p.m. the East 
Duke Music Room will provide the setting for a Fac- 
ulty and Guest Recital by John Ruggero, pianist, and 
Judy Benedict, violinist. 

John Ruggero, pianist and composer, studied piano 
with Loren Withers and composition and orchestration 
with Iain Hamilton at Duke University, where he re- 
ceived his B.A. in 1967 (Phi Beta Kappa). He studied 
with Irwin Freundlich at the Juilliard School, where he 
received his M.S. in 1969 under a special scholarship 
from Mary Semans of Durham, NC. After spending 
several years in New York City as a music copyist and 
editor working with Arnold Arnstein, who is renowned 
in his field, he returned to Raleigh and began teaching 
piano at Duke and privately. Since 1976, he has been 
the associate president and keyboard player for the 
North Carolina Chamber Players, a group of out- 
standing musicians from the N. C. Symphony who 
present a concert series in the Triangle area. During 
the last four years, John Ruggero has performed over 
60 different chamber works, favorably received by au- 
diences and the press. Along with the N. C. Chamber 
Players, he has played with the Ciompi Quartet, the 
Clarion Quintet of the N. C. School of the Arts, the 
Duke Symphony, Regina Mushabac, winner of the 
N. C. Symphony Young Artists' Competition, Edwin 
Grzneskowski, artist-in-residence at Sandhills Col- 
lege, and Vartan Menugian, artist-in-residence at the 
N. C. School of the Arts. In addition, he has acted as 
accompanist for the National Opera Company summer 
festivals at Duke, and was instrumental in establishing 
the 1978 Loblolly festival and the 1979 Artsfare festival 
at Duke. 

John Ruggero is also a composer and has written a 
number of educational works for piano students and is 
presently working on a piano method. 

Judy Benedict, violinist, is a graduate of the Juilliard 
School of Music, where she studied with Dorothy 
DeLay and Ivan Galamian. She received her Master's 
degree from the University of Iowa, where she studied 
with Charles Freger. An assistant professor of Music 
at the University of Georgia for 4'/i years, Ms. Be- 
nedict has also been a member of the first violin sec- 
tions of Dallas, Atlanta, and the North Carolina Sym- 
phonies. She was formerly the Assistant Concertmas- 
terof the N. C. Symphony. Ms. Benedict is currently a 
member of the North Carolina Chamber Players and 
has appeared as soloist with the N. C. Symphony as 
well as appearing frequently as a recitalist in the 
Triangle Area. During the Summer of 1979 she was the 
Concertmaster of the N. C. Chamber Players when 
they appeared on National Educational Television in 
the world premier of a string quartet with the Paul 
Taylor Dancers as a part of the American Dance Festi- 



val at Duke University. 

The October 30th program will include Sonata in F 
major. Op. Posthumous by Felix Mendelssohn; Duo 
Concertant by Igor Stravinsky; and Sonata in A 
major, Op. 13 by Gabriel Faure. There will be no ad- 
mission charge as is the case with almost all of the 
programs which are sponsored by the Duke University 
Department of Music. The public is invited to attend. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
KDP LUNCHEON SEMINAR 

The Department of Education and KDP will sponsor 
a luncheon symposium on Wednesday, October 31st, 
at 12:30 p.m. in 202 West Duke Building (East Cam- 
pus). Dr. Peter Burch will speak on "Children's Views 
of Counseling*'; a discussion will follow. Anyone in- 
terested is invited to attend and bring a bag lunch. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM 

On Wednesday, October 31st, at 1:00 p.m. in Room 
307 Perkins Library, Bruce M. Russett, Yale Univer- 
sity and the Institute for Research in the Social Sci- 
ences (U.N.C.), will speak on "A Model of Depen- 
dencia: Some First Tests" as lecturer in the Political 
Science Colloquium Series. 

ROUND TABLE ON SCIENCE AND 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURE 

Dr. Arthur Bueche, Senior Vice President for Cor- 
porate Technology of the General Electric Company, 
will speak on "The Hard Truth About Our Energy 
Future" on Wednesday, October 31st, at 8:15 p.m. in 
the Gross Chemical Laboratory Auditorium. Dr. Con- 
stance Kalbach, Visiting Assistant Professor of 
Physics, will preside. The lecture is sponsored by the 
Round Table on Science and Public Affairs. The public 
is invited to attend. 

Members of the University community are invited to 
meet Dr. Bueche and exchange views on the topic of 
the lecture at a coffee on Thursday, November 1st, 
between 10:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon in the Commons 
Room, Room 331 Sociology- Psychology Building. 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT WEEKLY RECITALS 

Guest, faculty, and student weekly recitals will be 
held in the rehearsal hall of the Mary Duke Biddle 
Music Building, beginning Thursday, November 1st, 
and continuing through December 13th from 12:00 
noon-l:00 p.m. Richard Reid, artist-in-residence 
(N. C. Visiting Artists' Program), Craven Community 
College (New Bern), will perform on Thursday, 
November 1st, piano selections which he will perform 
in Carnegie Recital Hall (N. Y. C. ) in June, 1980. 

HOOF N HORN PRESENTS "LITTLE ME" 

Hoof n Horn, the organization for student- 
produced musicals, will present Neil Simon's Little 
Me on Thursday, November 1st, and Friday, 
November 2nd, at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday, November 4th 



and 11th at 2:30 p.m. (matinees), and Friday-Sunday, 
November 9th-l 1th, at 8:15 p.m. in Fred Theatre 
(below Flowers Lounge). Tickets for all performances 
are $3.50 and may be purchased at Page Box Office; 
Master Charge and Visa are accepted. Information ( 
about group rates for the Sunday matinee is available 
from Nancy Wright, 684-1788. 

Little Me, based on a book by Patrick Dennis 
(Auntie Maine), is about the reminiscences of a color- 
ful old actress as told to her biographer. In flashbacks. 
Belle relates her rise from rags to riches and her scan- 
dalous love life, involving her five husbands. Neil 
Simon, with characteristic wit, makes fun of a multi- 
tude of musical theatre and American traditions. 
Music for the show was written by Cy Coleman, who 
wrote the Broadway hit, / Love My Wife. The score 
includes such famous numbers as "I've Got Your 
Number" and "Real Live Girl." The leads are played 
by Majorie Preston, Mike Rogers, and LeeAnn 
Cheeves. Caroline Slusser is directing the show; the 
musical direction is by Mike Kosarin, and choreog- 
raphy is by Jeff Patterson and Donna Shelton. 






ART EXHIBITION 
NANCY TUTTLE MAY 

Nancy Tuttle May, watercolorist, will have an exhi- 
bition of her works from November 2nd-30th in the 
West Campus Gallery (104 Flowers). The exhibition is 
sponsored by the Duke Union Galleries Committee. 

WOMEN'S HEALTH PROGRAM 

The Women's Health Program will sponsor a 
lecture/discussion, "Rape: Our Legal, Medical, and 
Individual Responsibilities toward the Victim," on 
Friday, November 2nd, from 12:00 noon-l:00 p.m. in 
Room 226 Perkins Library. This is a lunch-hour pro- 
gram. Those attending are asked to bring their lunch. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Dwight Billings, Professor, Botany Department, 
will speak on "Adaptations of Plants to Cold Envi- 
ronments along the Cordillera from the Artie to the 
Equator" on Friday, November 2nd, at 12:30 p.m. in 
Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

The Department of Biochemistry will sponsor a 
seminar with Argiris Efstratiadis, Department of 
Biological Chemistry, Harvard Medical School, on 
Friday, November 2nd, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 
Nanaline H. Duke Building. His topic will be "The 
Structure and Evolution of Preproinsulin Genes." 
Coffee will be served at 12:15 in the lobby. 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. J. Simons from the University of Utah will pre- 
sent a seminar entitled "Recent Developments in 
Negative Ion Chemistry" on Friday, November 2nd, 
at 3:30 p.m. in Room 103 Gross Chemical Lab. Re- 
freshments will be served in the Lobby at 3:10 p.m. 



DUKE PLAYERS PRESENTS 
TWO ONE-ACT PLAYS 

Tickets are now on sale at Page Box Office for the 
annual Duke Players Freshman-Sophomore Produc- 
tion on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, November 2nd, 
3rd and 4th, at 8:15 p.m. in Branson Theatre. This 
year's FSP features two contemporary American 
one-act plays, Chamber Music by Arthur Kopit and 
This Is The Rill Speaking by Lanford Wilson. Arthur 
Kopit is the author of Wings, Indians, and Oh Dad, 
Poor Dad, Mamma's Hung You In The Closet And 
I'm Feeling So Sad, among other plays. Lanford Wil- 
son has written The Mound Builders (produced by 
Duke Players last season), The Hot L Baltimore, The 
Fifth of July and The Rimers of Eldritch. 

The Freshman-Sophomore Production is a student- 
directed, designed, acted and produced evening in- 
tended to insure an opportunity for Freshmen and 
Sophomore Duke students to get involved with Duke 
Players. All seats are General Admission for $2.00 and 
may be purchased in advance at Page Box Office or at 
the door on evenings of performance. 

MODERN BLACK MASS CHOIR 
IN VARIETY SHOW 

The Modern Black Mass Choir will perform in a 
variety show on Saturday, November 3rd, at 8:00 p.m. 
in Baldwin Auditorium (East Campus). Duke students 
will dance, sing, do comedy routines, and give original 
poetry readings. Tickets, priced at $1.00, general ad- 
mission, will be available at the door. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

JOHN HANKS & FRIENDS 

25TH ANNIVERSARY 

The Department of Music will present JOHN 
HANKS AND FRIENDS— 25th Anniversary Concert 
on Saturday, November 3rd, at 8:15 p.m. in the East 
Duke Music Room. The program, which will feature 
Mr. Hanks, tenor and head of the voice faculty, will 
also include many other faculty members, as well as 
friends from the community. A new composition by 
Michael Ching, Mary Duke Biddle Scholarship recipi- 
ent in composition, based on poems by Wallace Ste- 
vens ("Six Significant Landscapes"), will be pre- 
miered by John Hanks, Allan Bone, Giorgio Ciompi, 
and Jane Hawkins. The public is invited; admission is 
free. 

The program follows: 

I 
Three Arias J. S. Bach 

(1683-1750) 

1. Teh bin vergniigt in meinen Leiden" 
Cantata No. 58 

2. "Die Armen will der Herr umarmen" 
Cantata No. 186 

3. Teh ende behende mein irdisches Leben" 
Cantata No. 57 

Messrs. Ciompi, Raimi. Ms. Hawkins, Mr. Hanks 



Mss. Cheves and Hardin 

Messrs. Lail. Allen, Sage and Hanks 

Ms. Huestis 

Miserere Scene from "E Trovatore" Verdi 

(1813-1901) 
Ms. Hull, Mr. Hanks and Ensemble 
Ms. Huestis 

III 
*Six Simple Settings 
from Six Significant Landscapes 
by Wallace Stevens 



J. Michael Ching 

(1958- ) 



1. An old man sits . . . 

2. The night is the color . . . 

3. I measure myself . . . 

4. When my dream was near the moon, . . . 

5. Not all the knives of the lamp-posts, . . . 

6. Rationalists, wearing square hats, . . . 

Messrs. Bone, Ciompi, Hanks and Ms. Hawkins 
IV 



Schubert 
(1797-1828) 
Brahms 
(1833-1897) 
Wolf 
(1860-1903) 
Wolf 
(1860-1903) 
Richard Strauss 
(1864-1949) 
Ms. London, Messrs. Sharon and Hanks 



John Duke 
(1899- ) 



Der Doppelganger (Heine) 
Die Mainacht (Holly) 
Aug einer Wanderung (Moericke) 
Anakreons Grab (Goethe) 
Zueignung (von Gilm) 



Five Songs 



Sextet from "Lucia" 



Donizetti 
(1797-1848) 



1. When I set out for Lyonesse (Thomas Hardy) 

2. Peggy Mitchell (James Stephens) 

3. White in the moon (A. E. Housman) 

4. Loveliest of Trees (A. E. Housman) 

5. Yellow Hair (W. B. Yeats) 

Ms. Evans, Messrs. Price and Hanks 
*lst Performance 

John Hanks, who has been a member of Duke's 
music faculty since 1954, received his B.S. degree 
from the Juilliard School of Music and his A.M. degree 
from Columbia University. Mr. Hanks, a tenor, is the 
Director of Voice studies for the Music Department at 
Duke University, Director of York Chapel — Divinity 
School, and Director of the Opera Workshop. He has 
appeared in concert on four continents, sung in opera, 
concert, radio. TV and oratorio in New York and other 
major cities. During 1954 John Hanks appeared with 
the National Symphony Orchestra of Washington, 
D. C, as tenor soloist. He has also appeared with 
symphony orchestras in Seattle, Oklahoma City, and 
Springfield, Massachusetts. 

John Hanks has recorded two volumes of "The Art 
Song in America." Together, the two albums — 
totalling six-sides are recognized as important con- 
tributions to the growing discography of American 
song. 

"From Duke University comes the most ambitious one-man 
recital so far offered in the field of American song. ... It is good 
to have this large slice of our national heritage. . . . Hanks has 
admirable taste and intelligence: not the least of his assets is 
excellent diction. . . . The singer is admirably seconded by Ruth 
Friedberg. ..." 

—THE AMERICAN RECORD REVIEW 



DUKE ARTISTS' SERIES 

NICOLAI GEDDA, TENOR 

METROPOLITAN OPERA COMPANY 

Nicolai Gedda will entertain the Triangle area with 
his brilliant tenor voice on Sunday, November 4th, at 
8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Mr. Gedda comes to 
Durham as the second performer in the Duke Artists' 
Series. Remaining tickets for this performance are 
priced at $7.00 and $6.00 and are available at Page Box 
Office: Monday- Friday, 9:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m.; Master 
Charge/Visa, 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.; tel. 684-4059, 684- 
3227. With 135 recordings to his credit, Nicolai Gedda 
has the distinction of being the most-recorded tenor in 
the world. His voice can encompass almost anything in 
the field of oratorio, opera, operetta, and song, 
whether originally written in English, French, Ger- 
man, Italian, Latin, Russian, or Swedish. This season 
marks Gedda's twenty-second year with the Met- 
ropolitan Opera, where he is appearing in a new pro- 
duction of Mozart's Abduction from the Seraglio. Last 
season he appeared as Lensky in Eugene Onegin and 
opposite Beverly Sills in the new production of Don 
Pasquale. He also was featured in the nationally tele- 
vised The Bartered Bride. 

His program follows: 

"SONGS OF THE SOUTH'' 

Program 

I 



Notte 

Stomellatrice 
La strada bianca 
Stornelli capricciosi 
Aria: Una furtiva lagrima, 
from '"L'Elisir d"Amore" 



Chanson triste 

Le manoir de Rosamonde 

Phidyle 



Ottorino Respighi 



Francesco Balilla-Pratella 
Vito Carnevali 



Gaetano Donizetti 



Henri Duparc 



INTERMISSION 

in 

Fleur jetee. Opus 39 
Poeme d'un jour: Opus 21 

Recontre 

Toujours 

Adieu 

IV 
Aria: Aubade, from "Le Roi d'Ys'" 

V 
Poema en forma de canciones 
Dedicatoria 
Nunca olvida 
Cantares 
Los dos miedos 
Las locas por amor 

APPLICATIONS AND NOMINATIONS FOR 
DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Applications and nominations of qualified candi- 
dates are invited for the position of Dean of the 
Graduate School, Duke University. The Dean is the 



Gabriel Faure 



Edouard Lalo 
Joaquin Turina 



chief academic and administrative officer for graduate 
affairs in the area of the arts and sciences and some 
other areas of the University. In concert with the Pro- 
vost of the University he is responsible for encourag- 
ing the continued growth in quality and the develop- 
ment of the graduate programs and activities in areas 
that fall within the purview of the Graduate Faculty. 
Through appropriate assistants, his office provides for 
the administrative and other services necessary for the 
proper functioning of the School. All communications 
should be received by November 12th, 1979, and 
should be sent to: 

Marcus E. Hobbs 

309 Gross Chemical Laboratory 

Duke University 

Durham, NC 27706 



" MESSIAH" PERFORMANCE 

The 1979 annual performance of George Frideric 
Handel's "Messiah" will be presented by the Duke 
Chapel Choir on Friday, November 30th, at 7:30 p.m.; 
Saturday, December 1st, at 2:00 p.m., and Sunday, 
December 2nd, at 3:00 p.m. in the University Chapel. 
Tickets, priced at $2.00, are available at Page Box Of- 
fice, or by sending requests to "Messiah," Box 4822 
Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Persons requesting 
tickets should state the number of tickets and perfor- 
mance date(s) desired, send a check or money order, 
and enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope for 
ticket return. Featured with the 180-member choir and 
the 30-member orchestra will be soloists Dorothy 
Combs, soprano; Meredith Marcellus, mezzo- 
soprano; William Mitchell, tenor, and Charles Michael 
Smith, bass. J. Benjamin Smith, Director of Chapel 
Music at Duke University, will direct the three per- 
formances. 



"AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS" 

In honor of the Year of the Child, "Amahl and the 
Night Visitors," a Christmas operetta for children, will 
be performed in the University Chapel on Thursday, 
December 6th, at 10:00 a.m.; Friday, December 7th, at 
10:00 a.m., and Saturday, December 8th, at 4:00 p.m. 
Tickets, priced at $1.00 for children and $2.00 for 
adults, are available at Page Box Office, or by writing 
AMAHL, Box 4822 Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. 

Mail requests should include the number of tickets 
and performance(s) desired, payment, and a self- 
addressed envelope for ticket return. Mail orders for 
Saturday, December 8th, will be accepted through 
November 29th. Checks should be made payable to 
Duke University. The Thursday and Friday matinees 
are primarily intended for groups of school children. 
Blocks of tickets may be ordered through November 
15th. Only a limited number of single tickets will be 
availble for these performances. Ticket sales begin 
Monday, November 5th. 



INOVJfcL;JV±±5Ji;K <JiYJ^H;iN UiYK 



WEDNESDAY 



7:00 & 9:30 p.m. 

Freewater Films: 
REEFER 

MADNESS" & 

"FREAKS." Bio. 

Sci. Aud. 
8:15 p.m. Hoof n 

Horn: LITTLE ME.' 

Fred Theatre. 



6 



11:00 am. Chapel. 

The Rev Mr. Robert 

T. Young. 
2:30 p.m. Hoof n 

Horn Matinee: 

■LITTLE ME." Fred. 
3:00-5:00 p.m. Art 

Exhibition: NANCY 

TUTTLE MAY. W. 

Gallery. 
5:30-7:30 p.m. 

Durham Arts 

Council Juried 

Show Opening 
8:15 p.m. Duke 

Players 

"CHAMBER 

MUSIC : THIS IS 
! THE RILL 

SPEAKING." 

Branson. 



8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 
N. C Licensed 
Practical Nurses' 
Assoc Page. 

7:00. 9:30 & 
11:30 p.m. AIH 
Film: "ONLY 
ANGELS HAVE 
WINGS." Bio. Sci. 



12:00 noon. Campus 

Club Luncheon. E 

Union. 
7:00. 9:00 & 

11:00 p.m. SAE 

Film: "DIRTY 

HARRY." Gross 

Chem. 
8:00 p.m. D. U. U. 

Major Speaker: 

GEORGE 

PLIMPTON. Page. 



8:00 p.m. N.C. 
SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA with 
MISHA DICHTER, 
Piano. Page. 



11 



IS 



13 



14 



15 



11:00 am. Chapel. 

The Rev. Dr. John 

Carlton. 
2:30 p.m. Hoof n 

Horn Matinee: 

"LITTLE ME. Fred 
7:00 & 9:00 p.m 

Quad Flicks: GET 

OUT YOUR 

HANDKERCHIEFS." 

Page. 
8:15 p.m. Hoof n 

Horn: LITTLE ME." 

Fred. 
8:15 p.m. Dept. of 

Music: D. U. 

CHORALE in 

CONCERT. Chapel. 



7:00. 9:00 & 
11:00 p.m. KA Film: 
AND NOW FOR 
SOMETHING 
DIFFERENT." Bio. 
Sci. 



8:15 p.m. D. U. WIND 8:00 p.m. HOLLY 
SYMPHONY NEAR Concert. 

ORCHESTRA. Page. sponsored by SANE 
(N. C. PIRG). Page. 



8:00 p.m. D. U. U. 
Major Attractions: 
BONNIE RAITT 
Cameron Indoor 
Stad. 



18 



11:00 a.m. Chapel. 

Student Preacher. 
8:15 p.m 

COLLEGIUM 

MUSICUM 

CONCERT. Chapel. 



25 



11:00 a.m. Chapel 

The Rev. Mr. Robert 

T. Young. 
7:00 4 9:30 p.m. 

Quad Flicks 

"COMING HOME ." 

Page. 



19 



26 

CLASSES RESUME 



20 



21 



22 



Nov. 2-30: NANCY 

TUTTLE MAY. 

Water Colors; W. 

Campus Gallery 
7:00 p.m. & midnight. 

Freewater Films 
NIGHT OF THE 

LIVING DEAD" 
9:30 p.m. & 2:00 a.m. 

"MARTIN." Bio. Sci. 
8 15 p.m. Hoof n 

Horn LITTLE ME." 

Fred Theatre. 
8:15 p.m. Duke 

Players: 
CHAMBER 

MUSIC". THIS IS 

THE RILL 

SPEAKING." 

Branson. 



6:00 p.m. 
THANKSGIVING 
RECESS BEGINS. 



2T 



29 



7:00. 9:00 & 
11:00 p.m. PKA 
Film: "ENTER THE 
DRAGON." Gross 
Chem. 

8:15 p.m. N. C. 
CHAMBER 
PLAYERS. EDMR. 



12:00 Noon. 

MEMORIAL ORGAN 

CONCERT for 

Richard Henney. 

Duke Endowment. 

Fenner Douglas, 

Organist. Chapel. 
8:00 p.m. MODERN 

BLACK MASS 

CHOIR CONCERT. 

Page. 
8:15 p.m. Dept. of 

Music Illustrated 

Lecture: WARREN 

KIRKENDALE. 

EDMR. 



9 



4:00 p.m. SPRING 
SEMESTER FILM 
PRESENTERS' 
MEETING. 201 
Flowers. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof n 
Horn: "LITTLE ME.' 
Fred. 



THANKSGIVING DAY. 



16 



8:15 p.m. Music 
Dept. Stu. Recital: 
MICHAEL CHING, 
Piano. EDMR. 

8:30 p.m. D. U. U. 
Broadway at Duke: 
JULIE HARRIS in 
"BELLE OF 
AMHERST." 



*^<*5 



3 



7:00 & 9:00 p.m 

Quad Flicks: THE 

LAST WAVE. Page 

Aud. 
8:00 p.m. MODERN 

BLACK MASS 

CHOIR VARIETY 

SHOW. Baldwin. 

$1.00. 
8:15 p.m. Duke 

Players: 
CHAMBER 

MUSIC;" THIS IS 

THE RILL 

SPEAKING." 

Branson. 
8:15 p.m. Music 

Dept. JOHN 

HANKS & 

FRIENDS— 25TH 

ANNIVERSARY." 

EDMR. 



io 



7:00 & 9:00 p.m. 

Quad Flicks: GET 

OUT YOUR 

HANDKERCHIEFS. 

Page. 
8:15 p.m. Hoof n 

Horn: "LITTLE ME." 

Fred. 



IT 



1:30 p.m. 

FOOTBALL: Duke 

vs. NCSU. W. W. 

Stadium. 
7:00 & 9:00 p.m. 

Quad Flicks: 

"BUCK ROGERS IN 

THE 25TH 

CENTURY." 
8:15 p.m. CHAMBER 

ARTS SOCIETY 

featuring the 

CLEVELAND 

QUARTET. EDMR. 



24 



1:30 p.m. 
FOOTBALL: Duke 
vs. UNC. W. W. 
Stadium. 



30 

5:00 p.m. HOLIDAY 
TREE LIGHTING. 
Main Quad. 

7:30 p.m. Chapel 
Choir: "MESSIAH." 
Chapel. 

Information about 
events and tickets is 
available from Page 
Box Office, tel. 
684-4059; 684-3227. 



ERASMUS CLUB LECTURE 
PROFESSOR JAMES APPLEWHITE 

On Monday, November 5th, at 4:15 p.m., in the As- 
sembly Room (Room 221) of Perkins Library, The 
Erasmus Club will meet to hear and discuss a paper by 
Professor James Applewhite entitled "Pleasure Dome 
and Sunless Sea: a Jungian Reading of the Juxtaposi- 
tion of Consciousness and Unconsciousness in Cole- 
ridge." An informal reception hosted by the Depart- 
ment of Music will follow. Everyone is invited to at- 
tend. 

Professor Applewhite, best known for his poetry, 
which has been widely published, has also a long- 
standing scholarly interest in the poetry of English 
romanticism. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John Patrick McDowell, III for the 
Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on Friday, November 2nd, at 
2:00 p.m. in Room 210 Divinity School. The subject of Mr. 
McDowell's dissertation is "A Social Gospel in the South: The Wo- 
man's Home Mission Movement in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South 1886-1939." The committee to conduct the examina- 
tion consists of Professors Stuart C. Henry presiding, Robert C. 
Gregg, Thomas A. Langford, David C. Steinmetz, and Robert M. 
Miller. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

calendar: 




November 4-11, 1979 



iume 79 



Published November 2, 1979 



Number 10 



Sunday, November 4 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. All Saints' Day Service. 
University Chapel. Preacher: The Rev. Mr. Robert T. Young. 
Minister to the University. The Service of Worship is broad- 
cast over WDBS, 107.1 FM (This service will be televised 
over WTVD. Ch. 11.) 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus Union and Oak Room, W. Campus. Open for faculty, 
staff, their families, and guests. Wine service available after 
1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

2:30 p.m. Hoof n' Horn Matinee: •LITTLE ME." Fred Theatre. 
$3.50. 

3:00-5:00 p.m. Opening Reception for NANCY TUTTLE MAY, 
Watercolors Exhibition. W. Gallery. Page. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayer. 505 Alexander Ave. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Artists' Series: NICOLAI GEDDA, Met. Opera 
Tenor. Page Aud. $7, $6. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "CHAMBER MUSIC"; "THIS IS THE 
RILL SPEAKING." Branson. $2. 

Monday, November 5 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
4:15 p.m. Erasmus Club Lecture. Speaker: Prof. James 

Applewhite. Rm. 226 Perkins Library. 
7:00, 9:30 & 11:30 p.m. AIH Film: "ONLY ANGELS HAVE 

WINGS." Bio. Sci. $1.50. 

Tuesday, November 6 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

12:00 noon. Campus Club Fall Luncheon. E. Campus Union Ball- 
room. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics and Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
A. E. Radford. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Music Lecture. Speaker: Dr. Alan Jabbour. 
Rehearsal Hall MDB Music Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Council on Aging & Human Development Seminar. 
Speaker: Dr. Carl Eisdorfer. Rm. 1504 Gerontology. 

7:00. 9:00 & 11:00 p.m. SAE Film: "DIRTY HARRY." Gross 
Chem. $1.50. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (Early German & French 
Cinema): "METROPOLIS" (1926). Young man abandons 
life of luxury to join oppressed workers in revolt against 
mechanized society of futuristic city. Bio. Sci. Free to 
everyone. 

8:00 p.m. D. U. Major Speakers" Committee: GEORGE 
PLIMPTON. Page Aud. Free, D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s; 
$1.50, others. 

Wednesday, November 7 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry Special Seminar: Speaker: 
George Weinstock. Rm. 147 N. H. Duke Bldg. 

8:00 p.m. N. C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA w/MISHA DICH- 

TER. Page Aud. $6: $3. 
Thursday, November 8 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 



3:45 p.m. Meeting of the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts & 
Sciences. Rm. 139 Social Sciences. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. Memorial Chapel (Univer- 
sity Chapel). 

7:00, 9:30 p.m. & midnight. G-A Dorm Film: "MONTY PYTHON 
& THE HOLY GRAIL." Gross Chem. Aud. $1.50. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (Images of Nuclear War): "FAIL 
SAFE." U. S. President has to make trade with Soviet Union 
when American bombers are instructed in error to drop nu- 
clear bombs on Moscow. Henry Fonda, Walter Matthau. Bio. 
Sci. Free, D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s; $1.50, others. 

7:45 p.m. Holy Land Archaeological Lecture. Speaker: Prof. 
Volkmar Fritz. York Chapel. 

Friday, November 9 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:00 noon. Women's Health Program Lecture/Demonstration. 

Rm. 226 Perkins. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Helen Miller. Rm. 144 

Bio. Sci. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Michael 
Czech. Rm. 147 N. H. Duke. 
1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, of D. U. Prayers. York Chapel. 
3:30 p.m. Dept. of Chemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Jan 

Michalski. Rm. 103 Gross Chem. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (Friday Night Series): "BREAD 
& CHOCOLATE." Bittersweet comedy about an Italian 
worker in Switzerland who is a dark misfit in a world of 
prospering blonds. Bio. Sci. D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s; 
$1.50. others. 

Saturday, November 10 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

10:30 a.m. Freewater Children's Film: "THE 5000 FINGERS OF 
DR. T." Gross Chem. $1.50. 

1:00 p.m. Photograms Workshop. Crafts Center. Fee. 

5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "GET OUT YOUR 
HANDKERCHIEFS." French comedy about a woman who 
attracts and mystifies two hilariously serious men, but who 
succumbs to the charms of an ingenious thirteen-year old. 
Critics loved it. Page Aud. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof n' Horn: "LITTLE ME." Fred Theatre. $3.50. 

Sunday, November 11 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. John Carlton, Professor of Preaching, 
Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Wake Forest, 
N. C. The Service of Worship is broadcast over WDBS, 
107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus Union and Oak Room, W. Campus. Open for faculty, 
staff, their families, and guests. Wine service available after 
1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

2:30 p.m. Hoof n' Horn: "LITTLE ME." Fred Theatre. $3.50. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayer. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 p.m. D. U. CHORALE FALL CONCERT. Chapel. Free. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "GET OUT YOUR 
HANDKERCHIEFS." Page Aud. $1.50. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University. 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



The next Calendar will cover a two-week period, 
November llth-25th, to include the Thanksgiving 
recess. The deadline for this issue will be Monday. 
November 5th. before 3:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available from Flowers Information Desk. 



DUKE PLAYERS PRESENTS 
TWO ONE-ACT PLAYS 

Tickets are now on sale at Page Box Office for the 
annual Duke Players Freshman-Sophomore Produc- 
tion on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. November 2nd, 
3rd and 4th, at 8:15 p.m. in Branson Theatre. This 
year's FSP features two contemporary American 
one-act plays. Chamber Music by Arthur Kopit and 
This Is The Rill Speaking by Lanford Wilson. Arthur 
Kopit is the author of Wings, Indians, and Oh Dad, 
Poor Dad, Mamma's Hung You In The Closet And 
I'm Feeling So Sad, among other plays. Lanford Wil- 
son has written The Mound Builders (produced by 
Duke Players last season). The Hot L Baltimore. The 
Fifth of July and The Rimers of Eldritch. 

The Freshman-Sophomore Production is a student- 
directed, designed, acted and produced evening in- 
tended to insure an opportunity for Freshmen and 
Sophomore Duke students to get involved with Duke 
Players. All seats are General Admission for S2.00 and 
may be purchased in advance at Page Box Office or at 
the door on evenings of performance. 



HOOF 'N HORN PRESENTS •'LITTLE ME" 

Hoof n Horn, the organization for student- 
produced musicals, will present Neil Simon's Little 
Me on Thursday, November 1st. and Friday, 
November 2nd, at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday, November 4th 
and 11th at 2:30 p.m. (matinees), and Friday-Sunday, 
November 9th-llth, at 8:15 p.m. in Fred Theatre 
(below Flowers Lounge). Tickets for all performances 
are $3.50 and may be purchased at Page Box Office; 
Master Charge and Visa are accepted. Information 
about group rates for the Sunday matinee is available 
from Nancy Wright, 684-1788. 

Little Me, based on a book by Patrick Dennis 
(Auntie Maine), is about the reminiscences of a color- 
ful old actress as told to her biographer. In flashbacks, 
Belle relates her rise from rags to riches and her scan- 
dalous love life, involving her five husbands. Neil 
Simon, with characteristic wit, makes fun of a multi- 
tude of musical theatre and American traditions. 
Music for the show was written by Cy Coleman, who 
wrote the Broadway hit, / Love My Wife. The score 
includes such famous numbers as "I've Got Your 
Number" and "Real Live Girl." The leads are played 
by Majorie Preston, Mike Rogers, and LeeAnn 
Cheeves. Caroline Slusser is directing the show; the 
musical direction is by Mike Kosarin. and choreog- 
raphy is by Jeff Patterson and Donna Shelton. 



WATERCOLORS EXHIBITION 
NANCY TUTTLE MAY 






The Duke Union Galleries Committee is sponsoring 
an exhibition of watercolors by Nancy Tuttle May 
through November 30th in West Gallery, 104 Flowers. 
A reception for the artist will be held from 3:00-5:00 
p.m. on Sunday, November 4th, in the gallery. These 
watercolors are the result of a flow technique — "color, 
depth, and movement, using liquid synchromatic 
transparent watercolors'" — the artist has been de- 
veloping this year. Ms. May is in her fourth year at 
Durham Tech under the sponsorship of the Visiting 
Artist Program. This past Summer she studied 
sculpture, painting, and Italian at the Universita per 
Stranieri. In 1980 her works will be exhibited through- 
out Italy in a one-artist show. Ms. May has studied 
watercolor for ten years, during which time her work 
has been featured in state and national publications, 
bought for collections, and shown in various exhibi- 
tions and demonstrated for workshops. She was the 
recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts special 
grant with North Carolina, which enabled her to dem- 
onstrate her art and establish an arts council for Pam- 
lico County. 

DUKE ARTISTS' SERIES 

NICOLAI GEDDA, TENOR 

METROPOLITAN OPERA COMPANY 

Nicolai Gedda will entertain the Triangle area with 
his brilliant tenor voice on Sunday, November 4th, at 
8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Mr. Gedda comes to 
Durham as the second performer in the Duke Artists' 



Series. Remaining tickets for this performance are 
priced at $7.00 and $6.00 and are available at Page Box 
Office: Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m.; Master 
Charge/ Visa, 10:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m.: tel. 684-4059, 684- 
3227. With 135 recordings to his credit, Nicolai Gedda 
has the distinction of being the most-recorded tenor in 
the world. His voice can encompass almost anything in 
the field of oratorio, opera, operetta, and song, 
whether originally written in English, French, Ger- 
man, Italian, Latin, Russian, or Swedish. This season 
marks Gedda's twenty-second year with the Met- 
ropolitan Opera, where he is appearing in a new pro- 
duction of Mozart's Abduction from the Seraglio. Last 
season he appeared as Lensky in Eugene Onegin and 
opposite Beverly Sills in the new production of Don 
Pasquale. He also was featured in the nationally tele- 
vised The Bartered Bride. 
His program follows: 

•SONGS OF THE SOUTH" 



Program 
I 



Notte 

Stornellatrice 
La strada bianca 
Stornelli capricciosi 
Aria: Una furtiva lagrima. 
from "L'Elisir d'Amore' 



Chanson triste 

Le manoir de Rosamonde 

Phidyle 



Ottorino Respighi 



Francesco Balilla-Pratella 
Vito Carnevali 



Gaetano Donizetti 



INTERMISSION 
III 



Henri Duparc 



Gabriel Faure 



Edouard Lalo 
Joaquin Turina 



Fleur jetee. Opus 39 
Poeme dun jour: Opus 21 

Recontre 

Toujours 

Adieu 

IV 
Aria: Aubade. from "Le Roi d'Ys" 

V 
Poema en forma de canciones 
Dedicatoria 
Nunca olvida 
Can tares 
Los dos miedos 
Las locas por amor 

ERASMUS CLUB LECTURE 
PROFESSOR JAMES APPLEWHITE 

On Monday, November 5th, at 4:15 p.m., in the As- 
sembly Room (Room 226) of Perkins Library, The 
Erasmus Club will meet to hear and discuss a paper by 
Professor James Applewhite entitled "Pleasure Dome 
and Sunless Sea: a Jungian Reading of the Juxtaposi- 
tion of Consciousness and Unconsciousness in Cole- 
ridge." An informal reception hosted by the Depart- 
ment of Music will follow. Everyone is invited to at- 
tend. Professor Applewhite, best known for his 
poetry, which has been widely published, has also a 
long-standing scholarly interest in the poetry of En- 
glish romanticism. 



CAMPUS CLUB SETS FALL LUNCHEON 

The annual luncheon of the Campus Club of Duke 
University will be held in the East Campus Union Ball- 
room on Tuesday, November 6th, at noon. Following 
a brief reception and the luncheon. Chancellor A. 
Kenneth Pye will speak on "Planning for the 
Eighties." 

Campus Club membership is still available for 
women faculty members and wives of faculty and ad- 
ministrative personnel. Among the club's activities 
this year are twenty interest groups, many of which 
meet monthly. 

For the information of newcomers who are eligible 
for membership and for former members who wish to 
be reinstated, the following board members will be 
helpful: 
Rheta Skolaut (489-2539) for general information 
Kally Christakos (489-2955) membership 
Sally Bolognesi (489-2584) interest groups 
Trish Robertson (489-1475) lecture series 
Betty Henderson (489-4152) fall luncheon 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS AND 
EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Dr. A. E. Radford, Professor of Botany, University 
of North Carolina, will present a seminar entitled 
"Habitat" on Tuesday, November 6th, at 12:30 p.m. 
in Room 130 Biological Sciences Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC LECTURE 
DR. ALAN JABBOUR 

The Duke University Department of Music will pre- 
sent Dr. Alan Jabbour, Director of the American 
Folklife Center in The Library of Congress, in a lec- 
ture entitled "Fiddle Tunes Frontier — with Some 
Thoughts on the Folk Regions of the English Speaking 
World" on Tuesday, November 6th, at 4:00 p.m. in the 
Rehearsal Hall of the Mary Duke Biddle Music Build- 
ing on Duke's East Campus. 

A recipient of a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship in 1963 
and a Danforth Fellowship in 1966-1968, Dr. Jabbour 
received his Ph.D. from Duke in 1968. His research 
includes American fiddle tunes of the Upper South and 
Appalachian folklore and folkmusic. 

The public is invited. Admission is free. 

D. U. COUNCIL ON AGING 
AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

The Council on Aging and Human Development will 
sponsor an open seminar on Tuesday, November 6th, 
at 4:00 p.m. in Room 1504 Gerontology Building. Dr. 
Carl Eisdorfer, Professor and Chairman, Department 
of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of 
Medicine, University of Washington, will speak on 
"Promising Research on Dementia." Trained at New 
York University (Ph.D.) and Duke (M.D.), Dr. Eis- 
dorfer is currently on sabbatical leave at the Institute 
of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, from his 
current position. He is also Acting Director of the In- 



stitute on Aging at Seattle. Dr. Eisdorfer spent many 
of the early years of his academic career at Duke, 
where he was Director of Dukes Center for the Study 
of Aging and Human Development, 1970-72. He is a 
past president of the Gerontological Society and an 
authority on intellectual functioning in later life. 



D. U. MAJOR SPEAKERS" COMMITTEE 
PRESENTS GEORGE PLIMPTON 

The Duke University Union Major Speakers' Com- 
mittee will present George Plimpton speaking on "An 
Amateur among the Pros'" on Tuesday, November 
6th. at 8:00 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Admission is 
$1.50 for everyone except Duke undergrads with 
I.D.'s. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY 
SPECIAL SEMINAR 

The Department of Biochemistry announces a spe- 
cial seminar with George Weinstock, Department of 
Biochemistry, Stanford University, who will speak on 
"'Enzymatic Activities of the recA Protein of E. colt" 
on Wednesday, November 7th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 
147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. 

N. C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA WITH 
PIANIST MISHA DICHTER 

Pianist Misha Dichter will join the North Carolina 
Symphony Orchestra as special soloist for a concert on 
Wednesday, November 7th, at 8:00 p.m. in Page Au- 
ditorium. Guest Conductor James Paul will lead the 
orchestra for this performance. Admission will be by 
season ticket or by single concert ticket. Single tickets, 
priced at $3.00 for students, senior citizens, and Sym- 
phony Society members and $6.00 for others, are 
available at Page Box Office, 684-4059. 

In 1966 pianist Misha Dichter gained international 
recognition when he won the Tchaikovsky Interna- 
tional Piano Competition in Moscow. Shortly after- 
wards, he made his nationally televised debut with the 
Boston Symphony under Erich Leinsdorf, and since 
then the young pianist has toured throughout the 
United States, Europe, the Soviet Union, and the 
Middle East. At the Juilliard School, Mr. Dichter 
studied with Rosina Lhevinne. While there he won the 
Beethoven Concerto Competition and was awarded 
the Joseph Lhevinne Scholarship, the highest recogni- 
tion the school offers. James Paul is currently As- 
sociate Conductor of the Milwaukee Symphony. A 
graduate of the Oberlin Conservatory. Mr. Paul also 
studied for two years at the Salzburg Mozarteum. He 
was a recipient of the Serge Koussevitsky Conducting 
Prize and the Eleanor R. Grace Memorial Prize at the 
Tanglewood Festival, presented by Erich Leinsdorf. 

The program will be Beethoven's Fidelio Overture; 
Liszt's Concerto No. I in E-flat Major for Piano and 
Orchestra, and Brahms Symphony No. 1 . 



MEETING OF UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY 
COUNCIL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

There will be a meeting of the Undergraduate Fac- 
ulty Council of Arts and Sciences on Thursday, 
November 8th, at 3:45 p.m., in 139 Social Sciences. 

HOLY LAND ARCHAEOLOGICAL LECTURE 

Professor Volkmar Fritz of Johannes Gutenberg 
University, Mainz, Germany, will present an illus- 
trated slide lecture, "The Israelite Settlement in Light 
of Recent Archaeology,'' on Thursday, November 
8th, at 7:45 p.m. in York Chapel (Divinity School). Dr. 
Fritz has co-directed excavations of Tel Mashosh in 
the northern Negev and worked extensively with the 
late Yochanan Aharoni at Beersheba, Arad, and 
Lachish. The lecture, which deals with the period of 
the Judges in ancient Israel, is being sponsored by the 
Duke Center for Judaic Studies and the Cooperative 
Program in Judaic Studies at UNC-CH. The public is 
invited to attend. 

WOMEN'S HEALTH PROGRAM 

The Women's Health Program will sponsor a 
lecture/discussion, 'Political Aspects of Women's 
Health Care: The Unique Perspective of a Nurse- 
Midwife," on Friday, November 9th, at 12:00 noon in 
Room 226 Perkins Library. Participants are asked to 
bring their lunch. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Helen Miller, graduate student in the Department of 
Botany, will speak on " Pests' and Plantago: A Pre- 
liminary Look at Herbivore and Pathogen Infestation 
of a Plant Population'" at a seminar on Friday, 
November 9th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

The Department of Biochemistry will sponsor a 
seminar with Michael Czech of Brown University on 
Friday, November 9th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 
Nanaline H. Duke Building. The seminar topic will be 
"Structural Aspects of Insulin Effector System Com- 
ponents." Coffee will be served in the lobby at 12:15 
p.m. 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. Jan Michalski from the Polish Academy will pre- 
sent a seminar entitled "Reactive Intermediates in 
Organophosphorus-Silicon Chemistry" on Friday, 
November 9th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 103 Gross 
Chemical Laboratory. Refreshments will be served in 
the Lobby at 3:10 p.m. 

CRAFTS CENTER PHOTOGRAMS WORKSHOP 

The Crafts Center, Southgate Dorm, East Campus, 
will sponsor a Photograms Workshop on Saturday, 
November 10th, from 1:00-5:00 p.m. Photograms is the 



most basic photo manipulation — printing without 
negatives. Students should bring various translucent 
and solid objects of interesting shape (such as paper 
clips, jewelry chains, leaves, glass objects) to work 
with. All other materials will be provided. Tuition for 
the workshop is $12.00. Information is available at 
684-6213 between 3:00-6:00 p.m. 

DUKE CHORALE CONCERT 

The annual Fall Concert of the Duke University 
Chorale will be presented in Duke Chapel on Sunday, 
November 11th, at 7:00 p.m. This performance will be 
the highlight of the Chorale's Fall Concert Season 
which included performances at the University of Vir- 
ginia and Pinehurst, N. C, as well as a world-premiere 
performance in Chapel Hill, N. C, of Six American 
Hymns by John Gardner. The concert will be con- 
ducted by Mr. J. Benjamin Smith is open to the public 
without charge. 

The program follows: 

Symphonia Sacra: Jubilate Deo . . attributed to Giovanni Gabrieli 

(1555-1612) 

Motet I: Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied Johann Sebastian Bach 

(1685-1750) 

Missa octo vocum Hans Leo Hassler 

(1564-1612) 

Six American Hymns In A Free Style, Op. 147 .... John Gardner 

(b. 1917) 

ARCHITECT CAREER COUNSELING 

A Representative from the Institute of Architecture 
and Urban Studies in New York will be available to 
meet with students interested in a career in architec- 
ture on Sunday evening, November 11th. Please con- 
tact Professor Epstein in the Art Department, East 
Duke Building (684-2224) for time, place and further 
information. 

QUEBEC STUDIES AT DUKE UNIVERSITY 

The new Program in Quebec Studies, designed to 
foster a number of academic interchanges between the 
faculty of Duke University and those of leading uni- 
versities in Quebec, will hold its formal opening 
November 13th-15th. Various public sessions will con- 
stitute a symposium on the theme "Quebec Society: 
Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.*' Leading social 
scientists from Laval University, the University of 
Montreal, and McGill University will participate, as 
well as American sociologists who made major con- 
tributions to the study of Quebec. In addition, there 
will be two evenings of films (Tuesday and Thursday) 
shown in Zener auditorium free of charge, and the 
monthly exhibit at Perkins Library will feature for the 
month of November the evolution of Quebec from folk 
culture to modern society. Details of the sessions will 
appear in next week's Calendar. 



APPLICATIONS AND NOMINATIONS FOR 
DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Applications and nominations of qualified candi- 
dates are invited for the position of Dean of the 
Graduate School, Duke University. The Dean is the 
chief academic and administrative officer for graduate 
affairs in the area of the arts and sciences and some 
other areas of the University. In concert with the Pro- 
vost of the University he is responsible for encourag- 
ing the continued growth in quality and the develop- 
ment of the graduate programs and activities in areas 
that fall within the purview of the Graduate Faculty. 
Through appropriate assistants, his office provides for 
the administrative and other services necessary for the 
proper functioning of the School. All communications 
should be received by November 12th, 1979, and 
should be sent to: 

Marcus E. Hobbs 

309 Gross Chemical Laboratory 

Duke University 

Durham, NC 27706 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY PRESENTS 
THE CLEVELAND QUARTET 

The Chamber Arts Society will present the prestigious 
Cleveland Quartet on Saturday, November 17th, at 
8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. A limited 
number of subscriptions for the remaining concerts are 
available by mail from P. O. Box 6065 College Station, 
Durham, NC 27708, at $20. Individual tickets, priced 
at $6.00, will be available at the door. 



"MESSIAH" PERFORMANCE 

The 1979 annual performance of George Frideric 
Handel's "Messiah" will be presented by the Duke 
Chapel Choir on Friday, November 30th, at 7:30 p.m.; 
Saturday, December 1st, at 2:00 p.m., and Sunday, 
December 2nd, at 3:00 p.m. in the University Chapel. 
Tickets, priced at $2.00, are available at Page Box Of- 
fice, or by sending requests to "Messiah," Box 4822 
Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Persons requesting 
tickets should state the number of tickets and perfor- 
mance date(s) desired, send a check or money order, 
and enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope for 
ticket return. Featured with the 180-member choir and 
the 30-member orchestra will be soloists Dorothy 
Combs, soprano; Meredith Marcellus, mezzo- 
soprano; William Mitchell, tenor, and Charles Michael 
Smith, bass. J. Benjamin Smith, Director of Chapel 
Music at Duke University, will direct the three per- 
formances. 



'AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS" 

In honor of the Year of the Child, "Amahl and the 
Night Visitors," a Christmas operetta for children, will 
be performed in the University Chapel on Thursday, 
December 6th, at 10:00 a.m. ; Friday, December 7th, at 
10:00 a.m., and Saturday, December 8th, at 4:00 p.m. 
Tickets, priced at $1.00 for children and $2.00 for 
adults, are available at Page Box Office, or by writing 
AMAHL, Box 4822 Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. 

Mail requests should include the number of tickets 



and performance(s) desired, payment, and a self- 
addressed envelope for ticket return. Mail orders for 
Saturday, December 8th, will be accepted through 
November 29th. Checks should be made payable to 
Duke University. The Thursday and Friday matinees 
are primarily intended for groups of school children. 
Blocks of tickets may be ordered through November 
15th. Only a limited number of single tickets will be 
availble for these performances. Ticket sales begin 
Monday, November 5th. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR. 




November 11-25, 1979 



ume 79 



Published November 9, 1979 



Number 1 1 



Sunday, November 11 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. John Carlton, Professor Preaching. 
Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. The Service of 
Worship is broadcast over WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room. E. Cam- 
pus Union, and Oak Room. W. Campus Union. Open for 
faculty, staff, their families, and guests. Wine Service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. K. Silkwood Week Energy Fair. Workshops. Main Quad 
(Flowers Lounge, if rain). 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Art Museum open. 

3:00 p.m. Art Museum Guided Tour. 

2:30 p.m. Hoof n' Horn Matinee: •LITTLE ME." Fred Theatre. 
$3.50. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Evening Prayer. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: GET OUT YOUR 
HANDKERCHIEFS." French comedy about a woman who 
attracts and mystifies two hilariously serious men. but who 
succumbs to the charms of an ingenious thirteen-year old 
boy. The critics loved it. Page Aud. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. D. U. CHORALE FALL CONCERT. Chapel. Free. 

Monday, November 12 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

4:15 p.m. Dept. of Music Lecture: Prof. Ritva Jonsson. Rehearsal 
Hall MDB. 

4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Prof. J. Joosse. Rm. 
1 1 1 Bio. Sci. 

7:00. 9:00 & 11:00 p.m. KA Film: "MONTY PYTHONS: AND 
NOW FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT." 
Bio. Sci. $1.00. 

8:00 p.m. K. Silkwood Week Video: Dr. Helen Caldicott's re- 
search on the effects of radiation. Rm. 211 Perkins. 

Tuesday, November 13 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:00 noon. Dept. of Anatomy Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Stephen J. 

Morris. Rm. 273 Sands. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Un. Program in Genetics Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Robert 

Voelker. Rm. 147 N. H. Duke. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics & Evolution Seminar. Speaker: 

Robert Sutter. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. 
3:00 p.m. Program in Quebec Studies. Speakers: Horace Miner; 

Everett C. Hughes. Jean-Charles Fallardeau. Rm. 226 Per- 
kins. 
4:00 p.m. K. Silkwood Week March. 
4:00 p.m. Dept. of Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Jeffery 

Barker. Rm. 147 N. H. Duke. 
5:30 p.m. K. Silkwood Memorial Service. Chapel. 
7:00 p.m. K. Silkwood Week Speaker: John Phillips. Rm. 139 Soc. 

Sci. 
7:00. 9:00 & 11:00 p.m. Warwick House Film: "SHAMPOO." 

Gross Chem. $1.50. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (Early French Cinema). "THE 

BLUE ANGEL' with Marlene Dietrich. 'BALLET 

MECHANIQUE." Bio. Sci. Free. 
7:30 p.m. Program in Quebec Studies. Film Session I. Zener Aud. 

(Psy.-Soc). 



8:15 p.m. D. U. WIND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA FALL 
CONCERT. Page Aud. Free. 

Wednesday, November 14 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:00 noon. Environmental Ethics Lecture: John Meleen. Rm. 

117-C Engr. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Educ./KDP Luncheon Symposium. Speaker: 

Ms. Joyce Bradbury. Rm. 202 W. Duke Bldg. 
1:00 p.m. Pol. Sci. Colloquium. Speaker: Willis D. Hawley. Rm. 

204 Perkins. 
3:00 p.m. Program in Quebec Studies. Speakers: Guy Rocher; 

Louis Balthazar, Vincent Lemieux. Rm. 226 Perkins. 
3:00 p.m. Institute of Pol. Sci. & Public Affairs Colloquium. 

Speaker: Joel Havemann. Rm. 204 Perkins 
7:00 p.m. Registration/Orientation, Snow Skiing. Card Gym. 
7:45 p.m. Archeological Institute of America Lecture. Speaker: 

Prof. Blanche Brown. Rm. 115 Ackland Art Center, 

UNC-CH. 
8:00 p.m. K. Silkwood Week— SANE, WDBS Concert with 

HOLLY NEAR. Page Aud. $5.00. 
8:00 p.m. Program in Quebec Studies. Speakers: Marie-Andree 

Bertrand: Paule Sainte-Marie. Jean O'Barr. Zener Aud. 

(Psy.-Soc). 

Thursday, November 15 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

9:30 a.m. Program in Quebec Studies. Speaker: Don Taylor. 

Davidson Bldg. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. 
5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. Memorial Chapel (Duke 

Chapel). 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films (Images of Nuclear War): 
"HIROSHIMA: A DOCUMENT OF THE ATOMIC 

BOMBING" and "THE WAR GAME." Bio. Sci. Free. 

D. U. undergrads w I.D.'s: $1.50. others. 
8:00 p.m. Program in Quebec Studies. Film Session II. Zener Aud. 

(Psy.-Soc.). 
8:00 p.m. D. U. U. Major Attraction: BONNIE RAITT. Cameron 

Indoor Stadium. $8.00, $7.00. 

Friday , November 16 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:00 noon. Women's Health Program Lecture Discussion. Rm. 226 

Perkins. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Robert L. Musser. 

Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochem. Seminar. Speaker: Winston Brill. 
Rm. 147 N. H. Duke. 
1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, of D. U. Prayers. York Chapel. 
3:30 p.m. Dept. of Chemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. S. L. Holt. 

Rm. 103 Gross Chem. 
7:00 p.m. Freeuater Films (Friday Series): "DIAL M FOR 

MURDER." 
9:30 p.m. & midnight. "NORTH BY NORTHWEST." Hitchcock 
Double Bill. Bio. Sci. Free. D. U. undergrads w I.D.'s; 
$1.50. others. 
8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music Recital: J. Michael Ching. EDMR. Free. 



8:30 p.m. D. U. U. Broadway at Duke: JULIE HARRIS in 'THE 
BELLE OF AMHERST." Page Aud. $7, $6. 

Saturday, November 17 

Nov. 17-Dec. 17 Art Exhibition: ELIZABETH ZUNG. Paintings. 

E. Campus Gallery. 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
1:30 p.m. FOOTBALL: Duke vs. N. C. State. W. W. Stadium. 
5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: -BUCK ROGERS IN THE 

25TH CENTURY.'" Page Aud. $1.50. 
8:15 p.m. CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY: THE CLEVELAND 

QUARTET. EDMR. $6. 

Sunday, November 18 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. Stu- 
dent Preacher: Edwin M. Richardson. The Service of Wor- 
ship is broadcast over WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus and in Oak Room. W. Campus. Open for faculty, staff, 
their families, and guests. Wine service available after 1:00 
p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: 'BUCK ROGERS IN THE 
25TH CENTURY." Page Aud. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music & The Arts in the Chapel: COLLEGIUM 
MUSICUM in recital of MUSIC OF HEINRICH SCHUTZ. 
Free. 

Monday, November 19 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics and Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

F. Gary Stiles. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. 

3:30 p.m. Meeting of the University Review Committee on the Use 
of Human Subjects in Non-Medical Research. Board Rm. 
Allen Bldg. 

8:15 p.m. International Affairs Seminar. Speaker: The Hon. Mat- 
thew Nimetz. Engr. Aud. 

Tuesday, November 20 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
6:00 p.m. THANKSGIVING RECESS BEGINS. 

Wednesday, November 21 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

Thursday, November 22 
THANKSGIVING DAY. 

Friday, November 23 

Saturday, November 24 
1:30 p.m. FOOTBALL: Duke vs. UNC. W. W. Stadium. 

Sunday, November 25 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Mr. Robert T. Young. Minister to the 
University. The Service of Worship is broadcast over WDBS. 
107.1 FM. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "COMING HOME." Jon 
Voight as Viet Nam vet paralyzed by war; Jane Fonda. 
Academy Award winner. Page Aud. $1.50. 



LIBRARY SCHEDULES 

All libraries will be closed on Thanksgiving Day. 
November 22nd. Complete schedules of each library's 
varying schedules for the Thanksgiving recess are 
available at the Reference Desk, Perkins Library. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham. NC 27706: telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of November 25th- 
December 2nd is Monday, November 19th, before 
3:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



ARCHITECT CAREER COUNSELING 

A Representative from the Institute of Architecture 
and Urban Studies in New York will be available to 
meet with students interested in a career in architec- 
ture on Sunday evening, November 11th. Please con- 
tact Professor Epstein in the Art Department, East 
Duke Building (684-2224) for time, place and further 
information. 

HOOF N" HORN PRESENTS 
"LITTLE ME" 

Hoof n' Horn, the organization for student- 
produced musicals, will present its final performances 
of Neil Simon's Little Me Friday-Saturday, November 
9th-llth, at 8:15 p.m. in Fred Theatre (below Flowers 
Lounge) and a matinee performance on Sunday, 
November 11th, at 2:30 p.m. Tickets for all perfor- 
mances are $3.50 and may be purchased at Page Box 
Office. Master Charge and Visa are accepted. Infor- 
mation about group rates for the Sunday matinee is 
available from Nancy Wright, 684-1788. 

KAREN SILKWOOD WEEK 

Karen Silkwood Week is being organized and spon- 
sored by two groups at Duke: Students for Safer Al- 



ternatives to Nuclear Energy and the Duke Faculty 
Committee for Alternatives to Nuclear Power. The 
groups were formed as a result of the Three Mile Is- 
land radiation leakage and have been active in prop- 
agating information on energy-related issues. The fac- 
ulty group is sponsoring a seminar series which meets 
every Tuesday, beginning November 13th, at 7:00 
p.m. in Room 139 Social Sciences. Everyone is en- 
couraged to attend this series to learn about the avail- 
able alternatives to nuclear energy. Professors 
Blackburn and Weintraub of the DFCANP were wit- 
nesses at the Utilities Commission this past Summer. 
The student group held an energy rally last Spring, 
educational conferences this Summer, and planned 
events for Karen Silkwood Week. Karen Silkwood 
was a nuclear laboratory technician at the Kerr- 
McGee plutonium plant, when she discovered that she 
had been contaminated. While driving to a meeting 
with a union official and a N. Y. Times reporter to 
relay information about plant conditions, she was 
killed. Special events to be held commemorating the 
significance of her actions are listed in the days-of- 
the-week section of the Calendar. Publicity with de- 
tails of times and places for events taking place during 
Karen Silkwood Week will be distributed on campus. 
Avery Rimer, 688-3256, has complete information. 

DUKE CHORALE CONCERT 

The annual Fall Concert of the Duke University 
Chorale will be presented in Duke Chapel on Sunday, 
November 1 1th, at 7:00 p.m. This performance will be 
the highlight of the Chorale's Fall Concert Season, 
which included performances at the University of Vir- 
ginia and Pinehurst, N. C, as well as a world-premiere 
performance in Chapel Hill, N. C, of Six American 
Hymns by John Gardner. The concert, which will be 
conducted by Mr. J. Benjamin Smith, is open to the 
public without charge. 

The program follows: 
Symphonia Sacra: Jubilate Deo attributed to Giovanni Gabrieli 
Motet I: Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied Johann Sebastian Bach 
Missa octo vocum Hans Leo Hassler 

Six American Hymns In A Free Style. Op. 147 John Gardner 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC LECTURE 

On Monday, November 12th, at 4:15 p.m., the De- 
partment of Music will sponsor a lecture by Professor 
Ritva Jonsson of the University of Stockholm. The lec- 
ture, "The Function of the Trope," will be given in the 
Rehearsal Hall of the Mary Duke Biddle Music Build- 
ing (East Campus). Professor Jonsson is the general 
editor of the ongoing series. Corpus Troporum. The 
public is invited. Admission is free. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday. November 12th, at 4: 15 p.m., in Room 1 1 1 of 
the Biological Sciences Building. Professor J. Joosse, 
Free University, Amsterdam, will speak on 
"Neuroendocrines, Reproduction and Metabolism in 



Molluscs." Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY SEMINAR 

Dr. Stephen J. Morris, Max-Planck-Institut fur 
Biophysikalische Chemie, Gottingen, Germany, will 
speak on "Recent Studies on the Aggregation and Fu- 
sion of Isolated Chromaffin Granules" on Tuesday. 
November 13th, at 12:00 noon in Room 273 Sands 
Building, His lecture is sponsored by the Department 
of Anatomy. Coffee and cookies will be served at 1 1 :45 



UNIVERSITY PROGRAM 
IN GENETICS SEMINAR 

The University Program in Genetics will present Dr. 
Robert Voelker. Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Na- 
tional Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 
RTP, at a seminar on Tuesday, November 13th, at 
12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. 
Dr. Voelker's topic will be "The Frequency of Al- 
lozyme Null Alleles in a North Carolina Population of 
Drosophila Melanogaster. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS 
AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Robert Sutter, Botanist for the Endangered Species 
Program of the State of North Carolina, will present a 
seminar entitled "The Population Biology of Two Rare 
Plant Species, Helonias bullata L. and Dalibarda re- 
pens L., in the Southern Appalachians" on Tuesday, 
November 13th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 130 Biological 
Sciences Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Jeffery Barker, Medical Officer, Laboratory of 
Neurophysiology, NINCDS, NIH, will speak on "In- 
sights into the Mechanisms of Action of Clinically Im- 
portant Drugs Using Morse Spinal Neurons Grown in 
Tissue Culture" at a Department of Pharmacology 
seminar on Tuesday, November 13th, at 4:00 p.m.. 
Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee will be 
served in the lobby at 3:45 p.m. 

PUBLIC OPENING OF PROGRAM 
IN QUEBEC STUDIES 

The Program in Quebec Studies, designed to en- 
hance information and professional contacts between 
Duke University and leading universities in Quebec, 
will have a public opening over the course of three 
days, November 13th- 15th. The theme of the sym- 
posium is "Quebec Society: Yesterday, Today, and 
Tomorrow." Distinguished speakers from Quebec and 
the United States will participate in four public ses- 
sions. On Tuesday and Thursday evenings there will 
be free showings of films portraying cultural and po- 
litical life in modern Quebec, from the crisis of Oc- 
tober 1970 to the elections of 1976. Perkins Library 
will feature an exhibit on Quebec during the month of 
November. 



The schedule of events follows: 

Tuesday. November 13 

3:00 p.m. "The Traditional Quebec Revisited: From French 
Canada to Quebec Nation." Speakers: Horace Miner. Everett C. 
Hughes, Jean-Charles Fallardeau. 226 Perkins Library. 

7:30 p.m. Quebec Film Session I: "Le Monde sen vient a 
Quebec" (1974) and "Action: October 1970." Cultural and po- 
litical life of Quebec. Zener Auditorium. 130 Psychology- 
Sociology. Free. 

Wednesday, November 14 
3:00 p.m. "The Quebec Society of Today: Socio-Political Trends 
and Changes." Speakers: Guy Rocher. Louis Balthazar. Vincent 
Lemieux. 226 Perkins Library. 
8:00 p.m. "The Quebec Society of Today: Changes in the Role 
and Status of Women." Speakers: Marie-Andree Bertrand, 
Paule Sainte-Marie, Jean O'Barr. Zener Auditorium. 130 
Psychology-Sociology. 

Thursday. November 15 

9:30 a.m. "The Quebec of Tomorrow: Psychological Probings of 
the Future." Speaker: Don Taylor. Davison Bldg. 

8:00 p.m. Quebec Film Session II: "15 November." The dra- 
matic elections of November 15. 1976. in a setting of collective 
effervescence. Zener Auditorium, 130 Psychology-Sociology. 
Free. 

D. U. WIND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
FALL CONCERT 

On Tuesday, November 13th, the Department of 
Music will present the Duke University Wind Sym- 
phony in its Fall Concert. The program, which begins 
at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium, is open to the public 
without admission charge. Paul Bryan will conduct the 
group of approximately 60 students. 



Music for the Royal Fireworks 

Overture 

Bouree 

La Paix. alia Siciliana 

La Rejoissance 

Menuet 1 

Menuet 2 
Concerto for Oboe in C Major (Hob. VII g: CI) 

Allegro spiritoso 

Deborah Giesler. oboe 
Sinfonietta(1961) 

Introduction and Rondo 

Pastoral Nocturne 

Dance Variations 
Elsa's Procession to the Cathedral 

from Lohengrin 



G. F. Handel 
arr. Harty. Hindsley, Bryan 



F. J. Haydn 



Ingolf Dahl 



Richard Wagner 
arr. Calliet 



ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS LECTURE 

The Environmental Engineering Graduate Students 
will sponsor a lecture by John Meleen, Visiting Fellow 
at the National Humanities Center, on Wednesday, 
November 14th. at 12:00 noon in Room 117-C, En- 
gineering Building. His topic will be "Environmental 
Ethics.*' Persons interested in attending the lecture are 
invited to bring a bag lunch; beverages will be pro- 
vided. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
KDP LUNCHEON SYMPOSIUM 

The Department of Education and KDP will sponsor 



a luncheon symposium on Wednesday, November 
14th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 202 West Duke Building. 
Ms. Joyce Bradbury will speak on "Current Issues in 
British Teacher Education.*' Ms. Bradbury was a 
member of the University Grants Committee from 
1967-1972 and in 1970 was honored by the Queen when 
she was made a Commander of the Order of the British 
Empire. She is a retired headmistress with 20 years 
experience in both selective girls' high schools, as well 
as comprehensive institutions. From 1974-1976, she 
was president of the Association of Headmistresses. 
She retired in 1978 and is making her first visit to the 
United States under a Moir-Cullis lecture fellowship. 
Interested persons are invited to bring a bag lunch and 
join the discussion following Ms. Bradbury's lecture. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM SERIES 

Willis D. Hawley will speak on "Even the Best-Laid 
Plans . . . Lessons in the Politics and Administration 
of Reorganization, from President Carter'" for the Po- 
litical Science Colloquium Series on Wednesday, 
November 14th, at 1:00 p.m. in Room 204 Perkins Li- 
brary. 

INSTITUTE OF POLICY SCIENCES 
AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS COLLOQUIUM 

The Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs 
colloquia series "The Fate of Social Programs in an 
Age of Fiscal Austerity" will feature Joel Havemann, 
Deputy Editor, National Journal, as colloquium 
speaker on Wednesday, November 14th, at 3:00 p.m. 
in Room 204 Perkins Library. His topic will be "Have 
the Budget Makers Forgotten the Poor?" 

SNOW SKIING COURSE 

Registration will be taken and orientation given for a 
snow-skiing course on Wednesday, November 14th, 
from 7:00-8:30 p.m. in Card Gym. More information is 
available from Charlie Harris, 684-2202, or John 
Riebel. 

ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE 
OF AMERICA LECTURE 

The Duke Chapter of the North Carolina Society of 
the Archaeological Institute of America announces a 
public lecture by Professor Blanche Brown, noted ex- 
pert on ancient Greek and Roman coins. Professor 
Brown, of New York University, will speak on 
"Styles in the Coin Portraits of the Successors of 
Alexander," on Wednesday. November 14th, at 7:45 
p.m. in Room 1 15 Ackland Art Center on the UNC-CH 
campus. The public is invited. 

HOLLY NEAR CONCERT 

Duke SANE and WDBS-FM will jointly sponsor a 
concert by Holly Near with J. T. Thomas, pianist, and 
sign language interpreter Susan Freundlich on 
Wednesday, November 14th, at 8:00 p.m. in Page Au- 
ditorium. Admission price is $5.00, general admission. 



Information concerning wheelchair and childcare con- 
siderations is available by calling 286-2275 days, or 
682-2601 nights. 

BONNIE RAITT IN CONCERT 

Bonnie Raitt will appear in concert under the spon- 
sorship of the Duke University Major Attractions 
Committee on Thursday. November 15th, at 8:00 p.m. 
in Cameron Indoor Stadium. Tickets, now on sale at 
Page Box Office, are $8.00, Reserved and General 
Admission, and $7.00, General Admission. 

WOMEN'S HEALTH PROGRAM 

The Women's Health Program will sponsor a 
lecture/discussion, "Birth Experience and Parent- 
Infant Synchrony," on Friday, November 16th, at 
12:00 noon in Room 226 Perkins Library. Participants 
may bring their lunch. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Robert L. Musser, graduate student in the Depart- 
ment of Botany, will give his doctoral seminar (the last 
presentation before receiving his Ph.D.) on the subject 
"Modeling the Carbon Balance of a Host-Parasite Re- 
lationship" on Friday, November 16th, at 12:30 p.m. 
in Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

Winston Brill, Department of Bacteriology. College 
of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Wis- 
consin (Madison), will speak on "Biochemical Genet- 
ics of Nitrogen Fixation" at a Biochemistry seminar 
on Friday. November 16th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 
Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee will be served at 
12:15 p.m. in the lobby. 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. S. L. Holt from the University of Georgia will 
present a seminar entitled "Detergentless Microemul- 
sions: Unique Media for Chemical Reactions" on Fri- 
day, November 16th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 103 Gross 
Chemical Laboratory. Refreshments will be served in 
the Lobby at 3:10 p.m. 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
"RECITAL OF NEW MUSIC" 

"A Recital of New Piano Music" will be presented 
by J. Michael Ching, Mary Duke Biddle Scholarship in 
Composition recipient, on Friday evening, November 
16th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. The 
program, which is sponsored by the Department of 
Music, will feature works by five young composers — 
Braxton Blake, J. Michael Ching, Robert Kyr, Robert 
Young McMahan and Fabian Watkinson. A senior at 
Duke University this year, Michael Ching is both a 
composer and pianist. 

*Sonatina (1975) Braxton Blake 

I. Fast 



II. Slow 
III. Fast 




Fantasy (1977) 

(from Sonata for Piano) 


J. Michael Ching 


Prelude and Fugue 


Fabian Watkinson 


Three Short Etudes (1977) 
(Recuerdos de Nuevo Mexico) 
Colibri en Monte Sol 
Lago Espiritual 
Gorja Pecos 


Robert Young McMahan 


Toccata: Surfacing (1979) 
(from Chronicles. Book I) 


Robert Kyr 


* First performance 
**First performance 


in N. C 



BROADWAY AT DUKE 
"THE BELLE OF AMHERST" 

Four-time Tony Award winner Julie Harris will 
bring the award-winning "The Belle of Amherst" to 
Page Auditorium on Friday, November 16th, at 8:30 
p.m. Sponsored by the Performing Arts Committee of 
the University Union, this Broadway at Duke Series 
production is a one-character portrayal of Emily Dic- 
kinson, America's best-known New England woman 
poet. "Should be seen in every state. Julie Harris's 
performance is astonishing." — Newsweek. Tickets, 
priced at $7.00 and $6.00, are now on sale at Page Box 
Office. 

CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY CONCERT 

The Chamber Arts Society will present the Cleve- 
land Quartet on Saturday. November 17th, at 8:15 
p.m. in the East Duke Building Music Room. 

The Cleveland Quartet has won acclaim from press 
and concert goers around the world as one of the great 
string quartets of our time. Their RCA releases have 
won national recognition, including several Grammy 
nominations and Best of Year awards from Time 
Magazine and Stereo Review. In addition to regular 
tours of the United States, they have played in several 
foreign countries and performed a special concert at 
the White House for the Inauguration of President 
Carter. 

Dedicated teachers, as well as performers, they are 
members of the faculty at the Eastman School of 
Music and have been Quartet-in-Residence for the past 
six summers at the Aspen Music Festival. A limited 
number of subscriptions for the remaining concerts 
will be available at the door for S20. Individual tickets 
are $6. Other concerts in the series will include the 
Fresk Quartet from Stockholm, Saturday, January 
26th, 1980; the Juilliard Quartet, Saturday, February 
23rd: and Beveridge and Michael Webster, clarinet 
and piano, Saturday, April 5th. Works scheduled for 
the Cleveland Quartet's performance are Men- 
delssohn's Quartet in A minor. Opus 13; Beethoven's 
Grosse Fnge in B-flat, Opus 133. and Bartok's Quar- 
tet No. 5. 

COLLEGIUM MUSICUM 
On Sunday evening, November 18th, the Duke Uni- 



versity Department of Music and Arts in the Chapel 
will present the Collegium Musicum with MUSIC OF 
HEINRICH SCHUTZ. Jan Herlinger will direct the 
Vocal Ensemble which will be joined by a Wind En- 
semble, Continuo, and a small Guest Orchestra. This 
program of German Baroque religious music will begin 
at 8:15 p.m. in Duke Chapel. 

The program, which is open to the public, is as fol- 
lows: 

I 

O Lord our Lord 

(from Psalms of David, 1619) 

Soloists 

viola de gamba and organ 

The Vocal Ensemble 

The Wind Ensemble 

The Orchestra 

II 

May the soul of Christ sanctify me 
(from Little Sacred Concertos, 1639) 
Soloists 
viola de gamba and organ 

III 

Musical Obsequies. 1637 
Concerto in the Form of A German Requiem 

(Kyrie:) Naked came I out of my mother's womb 

(Gloria:) For God so loved the world 
Motet: Lord, if I have thee only 
Canticle of Saint Simeon: 

Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace 

The Vocal Ensemble 

The Wind Ensemble 

viola da gamba and organ 

The Orchestra 

SPECIAL PLANT SYSTEMATICS 
AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Dr. F. Gary Stiles of the Departamento de Biologia, 
Universidad de Costa Rica will present a seminar enti- 
tled "Energy Relationships in a Dominance Hierarchy 
of Territorial Hummingbirds" on Monday, November 
19th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 130 Biological Sciences 
Building. 

UNIVERSITY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING 

The University Review Committee on the Use of 
Human Subjects in Non-Medical Research will meet 
on Monday. November 19th, at 3:30 p.m. in the Board 
Room of Allen Building. All materials (copy of re- 
search proposal, completed protocol, and completed 
federal forms, if applicable) must be submitted to the 
committee secretary, Robert Sawyer, 215 Allen 
Building, by noon on the Wednesday preceding the 
regular meeting. 

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS SEMINAR 

The Duke-U.N.C. International Affairs Seminar will 
have as its first guest speaker the Honorable Matthew 
Nimetz, Special Advisor to Secretary of State Cyrus 
Vance. Mr. Nimetz will speak on Monday, November 
19th, at 8:15 p.m. in the Engineering Auditorium on 
the topic "Future Trends in United States-Soviet Re- 



lations." All members of the University community 
are invited to attend. 

RECITAL CANCELLED 

The Department of Music recital by duo-pianists 
Ruth Phelps and Junita White, scheduled for Monday, 
November 19th, has been cancelled because of illness. 
The re-scheduled date for this recital will be an- 
nounced at a later date. 

EAST DINING HALLS 
THANKSGIVING SCHEDULE 

The closing schedule for the East Campus Dining 
Halls for the Thanksgiving recess will be as follows: 

The East Campus Union will close after dinner on Tuesday. Nov. 
20, 1979. 

The Magnolia Room will close after lunch on Tuesday, 
November 20, 1979. 

The Gilbert-Addoms Dining Hall will close after lunch on Tues- 
day. November 20. 1979. 

The Down Under will close after operations on Monday. 
November 19, 1979. 

All operations will be resumed on Monday, November 26. 1979, 
for regular hours. 

The Magnolia Room will be closed Sunday. November 25th, and 
will not be re-opened for Sunday Dinner until Sunday, De- 
cember 2nd. 

DUKE PLAYERS PRESENTS 
"THE BEEPLE" 

Tickets are now on sale at Page Box Office for the 
Duke Players annual Children's Theatre production. 
This year's children's play is "The Beeple" by Alan 
Cullen and is scheduled for ten performances — 
Fridays, November 30th and December 7th at 8:15 
p.m., Saturdays, December 1st and 8th at 11:00 a.m. 
and 2:00 p.m. and Sundays, December 2nd and 9th at 
1:30 and 3:30 p.m. However, two performances have 
already been sold out to school groups — Saturday, 
December 1st at 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. 

The play takes place in the industrious land of Hex, 
home of the Beeple. The hero, John Willy, lands in 
Hex quite by accident but finds he is just in time to 
help Humblebee, a Berson in distress. With the aid of 
Fuzzbuzz, they set out to save Humble's beloved 
Sweebee, daughter of Queebee the ruler of Hex, from 
the clutches of Wossup the Terrible. Ornit the Horrible 
and Black Beedle. A fun-filled hour to be enjoyed by 
everyone! 

Tickets for The Beeple are general admission $2.50 
for Adults and SI. 50 for children. In addition to being 
on sale at Page Box Office, they may be purchased by 
telephone using Master Charge or Visa at 684-3227 
between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Mail orders 
are also accepted by enclosing check made payable to 
Duke Players, self-addressed, stamped envelope and 
mailing to Duke Players, P. O. Box 6936 College Sta- 
tion, Durham, N. C. 27708. 

"MESSIAH" PERFORMANCE 

The 1979 annual performance of George Frideric 
Handel's "Messiah" will be presented by the Duke 



Chapel Choir on Friday, November 30th, at 7:30 p.m.; 
Saturday, December 1st, at 2:00 p.m., and Sunday, 
December 2nd, at 3:00 p.m. in the University Chapel. 
Tickets, priced at $2.00, are available at Page Box Of- 
fice, or by sending requests to "Messiah," Box 4822 
Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Persons requesting 
tickets should state the number of tickets and perfor- 
mance date(s) desired, send a check or money order, 
and enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope for 
ticket return. Featured with the 180-member choir and 
the 30-member orchestra will be soloists Dorothy 
Combs, soprano: Meredith Marcellus, mezzo- 
soprano: William Mitchell, tenor, and Charles Michael 
Smith, bass. J. Benjamin Smith, Director of Chapel 
Music at Duke University, will direct the three per- 
formances. 

"AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS" 

In honor of the Year of the Child, "Amahl and the 
Night Visitors," a Christmas operetta for children, will 
be performed in the University Chapel on Thursday. 
December 6th, at 10:00 a.m.: Friday, December 7th, at 
10:00 a.m., and Saturday, December 8th, at 4:00 p.m. 
Tickets, priced at SI. 00 for children and $2.00 for 
adults, are available at Page Box Office, or by writing 
AMAHL, Box 4822 Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. 

Mail requests should include the number of tickets 
and performance(s) desired, payment, and a self- 
addressed envelope for ticket return. Mail orders for 
Saturday, December 8th, will be accepted through 
November 29th. Checks should be made payable to 
Duke University. The Thursday and Friday matinees 
are primarily intended for groups of school children. 
Blocks of tickets may be ordered through November 
15th. Only a limited number of single tickets will be 
availble for these performances. Ticket sales begin 
Monday, November 5th. 

BASKETBALL TICKETS ON SALE 

The Duke University Athletic Association an- 
nounces that tickets for the first Iron Duke Classic 
basketball tournament and for home games with Col- 
gate and Georgia Tech are now on sale to the general 
public. 

The tournament will be held at Cameron Indoor 
Stadium on December 28th-29th. The Blue Devils will 
host South Carolina, Cincinnati and Vermont in quest 
of the inaugural Iron Duke Classic crown. On Friday 
evening, Duke will meet Vermont at 7:00 p.m. and 
South Carolina will play Cincinnati at 9:00. The losers 



will meet Saturday evening at 7:00 p.m. and the win- 
ners will play for the championship at 9:00. 

Colgate will come to Cameron on January 5th, 1980, 
and new ACC member Georgia Tech will be in Dur- 
ham on January 7th. 

Tickets can be purchased at the ticket office in 
Cameron or by writing Duke Ticket Office, Cameron 
Indoor Stadium, Durham. N. C. 27706. All tickets for 
the Iron Duke Classic (all four games) are $20.00. 
Tickets to the Vermont and Georgia Tech games are 
$6.00 each. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Ms. Brenda Bland Abdelrasoul for the 
Ph.D. degree in Education was held on Wednesday, November 7th. 
The subject of Ms. Adbelrasoul's dissertation was "Perceived 
Maternal-Child Behavior in Asthmatic Children." The committee 
conducting the examination consisted of Professors Lucy T. Davis, 
presiding. Peter Carboni. William Cartwright. Joseph Di Bona. 
Gerald Hartwig. and Robert Hock. 

The final examination of Mr. Thomas Charles Richardson for the 
Ph.D. degree in Education was held on Saturday. November 8th. 
The subject of Mr. Richardson's dissertation was "A Study of the 
Interrelationships of Scottish Education and Fiction of the Early 
Nineteenth Century." The committee conducting the examination 
consisted of Professors R. Baird Shuman. presiding. Peter F. Car- 
boni, David V. Martin, and Holger Nygard. 

The final examination of Ms. Marilyn C. Pike for the Ph.D. degree 
in Micro. & Immune will be held on Monday. November 12th at 
10:00 a.m. in Room 323 Sands Building. The subject of Ms. Pike's 
dissertation is "Biochemical Mechanisms of Leukocyte 
Chemotaxis: The Role of Cell Surface Receptors, S-Adenosyl-L- 
Methtonine-Mediated Methylation and Lipid Synthesis." The com- 
mittee to conduct the examination consists of Ralph A. Snyderman. 
presiding, D. Bernard Amos. Richard O. Burns. Ralph E. Smith, 
and Dolph O. Adams. 



The final examination of Ms. Dolores Elizabeth Janiewski for the 
Ph.D. degree in History will be held on Tuesday. November 13th at 
3:30 p.m. in Room 331 Perkins Library. The subject of Ms. 
Janiewski's dissertation is "From Field to Factory: Race. Class. 
Sex, and the Woman Worker in Durham. 1880-1940." The commit- 
tee to conduct the examination consists of Anne F. Scott, presiding. 
Sydney Nathans, Lawrence Goodwyn. and Carol B. Stack. 



RICHARD HENNEY MEMORIAL RECITAL 

Fenner Douglass, University Organist, will play the 
Memorial Recital for Richard Henney of the Duke En- 
dowment on Wednesday, November 28th. at 12:00 
noon and at 2:00 p.m. in the University Chapel. The 
program will include works by Scheidemann. Scheidt, 
Franck, and J. S. Bach. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 






Duke University 
calendar/ 




Nov. 25-Dec. 2, 1979 



Volume 79 



Published November 23, 1979 



November 12 



Sunday, November 25 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Mr. Robert T. Young. Minister to the 
University. The Service of Worship is broadcast over WDBS, 
107.1 FM. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: 'COMING HOME." Jon 
Voight as Viet Nam vet paralyzed by war; Jane Fonda as 
captain's wife who helps him. Page Aud. $1.50. 

Monday, November 26 

CLASSES RESUME. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

Tuesday, November 27 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
10:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Botany Department. Aromatic Plants Exhibit. 

Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Dept. of Microbiology & Immunology Genetics Semi- 
nar. Speaker: Dr. Igor Egorov. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke 
Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Faculty Discussion Session. Commons Rm. Divinity 
School. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (Love & Sexuality Series) "BED 
& BOARD." Triangle portraying comic variations of the dif- 
ficulty of communication. Discussion after first show. Rm. 
113. Bio. Sci. D. U. undergrads free w/I.D.'s; others $1.50. 

7:00. 9:00 & 11:00 p.m. PKA Film: "ENTER THE DRAGON." 
Gross Chem. Aud. $1.00. 

8:15 p.m. N. C. CHAMBER PLAYERS: "Music of the 20th Cen- 
tury." EDMR. $4. 

Wednesday, November 28 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:00 noon & 2:00 p.m. MEMORIAL ORGAN RECITAL FOR 

RICHARD BERNARD HENNEY, Duke Endowment. Fen- 

ner Douglass. Organist. Chapel. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: George 

Weinstock. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
1:00 p.m. Dept. of Political Science Colloquium. Speaker: Joseph 

J. Kruzel. Rm. 204 Perkins. 
3:30 p.m. Chemistry Dept. Seminar. Speaker: Dr. William H. 

Woodruff. Rm. 103 Gross Chem. Laboratory. 
7:00, 9:00 & 11:00 p.m. Beta Phi Zeta Film: "THE NINE LIVES 

OF FRITZ THE CAT." Bio. Sci. $1.00. 
8:15 p.m. Modern Black Mass Choir Concert. Page. 
8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music Illustrated Lecture. WARREN KIR- 

KENDALE: "MOZART'S BAROQUE STYLE." EDMR. 

Free 
8: 15 p.m. Round Table on Science & Public Affairs. Speaker: The 

Hon. Elmer B. Staats. Gross Chem. Aud. 

Thursday, November 29 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
3:30 p.m. Comparative Studies on Southern Asia Colloquium. 
Speaker: Dr. John Hume. Jr. Center for Internationa] 
Studies. 2101 Campus Dr. 



5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. Memorial Chapel (Univer- 
sity Chapel I. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (Images of Nuclear War): "DR. 
STRANGELOVE or HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WOR- 
RYING AND LOVE THE BOMB." Peter Sellers. Geo. C. 
Scott. Fanatical U. S. general launches A-bomb attack on 
U.S.S.R. and leaves President to contend with the politics. 
Bio. Sci. D. U. undergrads free w/I.D.'s; others $1.50. 

8:00 p.m. Philosophy Dept. Colloquium. Speaker: Prof. Paul 
Ricoeur. Rm. 204 West Duke Bldg. 

Friday, November 30 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Physiology Seminar. 

Speaker: Dr. Paul B. Lazarow. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke 

Bldg. 
1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, at D. U. Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). 

Baldwin Aud. Basement. 
3:30 p.m. Chemistry Dept. Seminar. Speaker: Dr. J. Cardenas. 

Rm. 103 Gross Chem. Lab. 
5:00 p.m. HOLIDAY TREE LIGHTING. Main Quad. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (Friday Night Series): "DAYS 

OF HEAVEN." One of the most beautifully photographed 

films ever made — photography is almost three dimensional in 

effect. Academy Award for Cinematography. Bio. Sci. D. U. 

undergrads free w/I.D.'s; others $1.50. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Chapel Choir: "MESSIAH." Chapel. $2. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "THE BEEPLE." Branson Theatre. 

$2.50 Adults: $1.50 Children. 

Saturday, December 1 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

10:30 a.m. Freewater Children's Film: "THE MIRACLE ON 34TH 
STREET." Also, "The Christmas Tree." Gross Chem. Aud. 
$1.50. 
11:00 a.m. & 2:00 p.m. Duke Players: "THE BEEPLE." Branson 

Theatre. $2.50 Adults; $1.50 Children. 
2:00 p.m. Duke Chapel Choir: "MESSIAH." Chapel. $2. 
5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "HAIR." Film version of 
the sixties' stage success. Straight young man from Ok- 
lahoma falls in love with a tribe of hippies when on his way to 
Viet Nam. Page Aud. $1.50. 
7:30 p.m. Women's BASKETBALL: Duke vs. ECU. 

Sunday, December 2 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. Thomas A. Langford. Dean, D. U. 
Divinity School. The Service of Worship is broadcast over 
WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room. E. Cam- 
pus and in the Oak Room, W. Campus Union. Open for fac- 
ulty, staff, their families, and guests. Wine service available 
after 1:00 p.m. 

1:30 & 3:30 p.m. Duke Players: THE BEEPLE." Branson 
Theatre. $2.50 Adults; $1.50 Children. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00 p.m. Duke Chapel Choir: "MESSIAH." Chapel. $2. 

7:00 & 9: 15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "HAIR." Page Aud. $1.50. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



The next Calendar (the last for this calendar 
year) will cover the period from Sunday, December 
2nd, through Monday, December 31st. 

Deadline for this Calendar will be Monday, 
November 26th, before 3:00 p.m. Please note that 
publicity for any event occurring during this ex- 
tended period is due by the above deadline. 



AROMATIC PLANTS EXHIBITED 

An exhibit of plants and plant products yielding 
spices and essential oils prepared for students in 
'Plants and Man" (Botany 90) will be open to the 
public on Tuesday. November 27th. from 10:30 a.m. to 
5:00 p.m. in Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 

UNIVERSITY PROGRAM 
IN GENETICS SEMINAR 

The University Program in Genetics will sponsor a 
seminar on Tuesday, November 27th, at 12:30 p.m. in 
Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building with Dr. Igor 
Egorov, Department of Microbiology and Immunol- 
ogy. His topic will be "Study of H, Mutations in 
Mice." 






NORTH CAROLINA CHAMBER PLAYERS 
MUSIC OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 

The North Carolina Chamber Players announce 
their third concert of the 1979-80 Durham series on 
Tuesday, November 27th, at 8:15 p.m. in East Duke 
Music Room. Special features of Music of the Twen- 
tieth Century will be Ernst von Dohnanyi Serenade 
Op. 10 and Olivier Messiaen Quartet for the End of 
Time and will be performed by Mary England, Phyllis 
Sandgren, Susan Gardner, Michael Cynewski, Judy 
Benedict, Gerald Nelson, and John Ruggero. Tickets 
are $4 and are available at Page Box Office, the Dur- 
ham Arts Council and at the door on Tuesday. 

The Chamber Players, in association with last sum- 
mer's ARTSFARE at Duke University, provided the 
music for the National Educational Television broad- 
cast of the Paul Taylor Dance Company. This broad- 
cast, one of the largest ever to hear a chamber music 
performance, marked the first time that a North 
Carolina classical music ensemble has appeared on 
nationwide television. The New York Times termed 
the broadcast "a whopping success" in recognition of 
the superior quality that the production displayed. 

MEMORIAL RECITAL FOR 
RICHARD BERNARD HENNEY 

A Memorial Organ Recital for Richard Bernard 
Henney (June 21, 1918-May 30, 1979), Executive Di- 
rector of the Duke Endowment, will be given by Fen- 
ner Douglass, University organist, on Wednesday, 
November 28th. at 12:00 noon and at 2:00 p.m. in the 
University Chapel. The recital will be held under the 
auspices of the Arts in Duke Chapel series. 

The program follows: 

Praeambulum in D minor Heinrich Scheidemann 

(1595-1663) 



Echo ad manuale duplex forte & lene 



Samuel Scheidt 
(1587-1654) 

Entrada Pablo Bruno 

(1611-79) 

Fantaisie in C major. Op. 16 Cesar Franck 

(1822-90) 
Poco lento 
Allegretto cantando 
Quasi lento 
Adagio 

Two Chorale Preludes: Johann Sebastian Bach 

(1685-1750) 
"We all believe in One God, Father" (S. 740) 
"We all believe in One God, Creator" (S. 680) 



INFORMAL DISCUSSION SESSION 
FOR FACULTY 

Provost William Be van and Chancellor A. Kenneth 
Pye will host an informal discussion session for mem- 
bers of the faculty on Tuesday, November 27th, from 
4:00-5:00 p.m. in the Commons Room of the Divinity 
School, where coffee will be served. After the discus- 
sion, the group will adjourn to the Rare Book Room in 
Perkins Library for a sherry hour. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
BIOCHEMISTRY SPECIAL SEMINAR 

George Weinstock. Department of Biochemistry, 
Stanford University, will speak on "Enzymatic Activ- 
ities of the recA Protein of E. coli" on Wednesday, 
November 28th. at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline 
H. Duke Building. (This Department of Biochemistry 
seminar is re-scheduled from November 7th). Coffee 
will be served at 12:15 p.m. in the lobby. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
POLITICAL SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM 

The Department of Political Science will sponsor a 
colloquium with Joseph J. Kruzel. Duke University and 
the Department of Defense, on Wednesday, 
November 28th, at 1 :00 p.m. in Room 204 Perkins. His 
topic will be "SALT II: Problems and Prospects." 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. William H. Woodruff from the University of 
Texas at Austin will present a seminar entitled "Reso- 
nance Roman Spectroscopy of Electronically Excited 
States and Other Ephemerols" on Wednesday, 
November 28th. at 3:30 p.m. in Room 103 Gross 
Chemical Laboratory. Refreshments will be served in 
the Lobby at 3:10 p.m. 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT LECTURE 
THE BAROQUE MOZART 

On the occasion of the publication of his book. 
Fugue and Fugato in Rococo and Classical Chamber 
Music by Duke University Press, Professor Warren 
Kirkendale of the Department of Music will present an 
illustrated lecture on "Mozart's Baroque Style" on 
Wednesday, November 28th, at 8: 15 p.m. in the Music 
Room of the East Duke Building. The public is invited 
to attend. Admission is free. 

ROUND TABLE ON SCIENCE AND 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURE 

The Honorable Elmer B. Staats, Comptroller Gen- 
eral of the United States, will speak on "Current Na- 
tional Issues Involving Science and Technology" on 
Wednesday, November 28th, at 8: 15 p.m. in the Gross 
Chemical Laboratory Auditorium. Mr. Charles B. 
Huestis, Vice President for Business and Finance, will 
preside. The lecture is sponsored by the Round Table 
on Science and Public Affairs and is open to the public. 

Members of the University community are invited to 
meet Dr. Staats and exchange views on the topic of the 
lecture at a coffee on Thursday, November 29th, be- 
tween 10:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon in the Commons 
Room, Room 331 Sociology-Psychology Building. 

COMPARATIVE STUDIES 
ON SOUTHERN ASIA COLLOQUIUM 

The program in Comparative Studies on Southern 
Asia invites all interested persons for the second 
meeting of the 1979-80 Colloquium on Thursday, 
November 29th. at 3:30 p.m. in the Center for Interna- 
tional Studies, 2101 Campus Drive. Dr. John Hume, 
Jr. will be the speaker. 

PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT COLLOQUIUM 

The Department of Philosophy will present Paul 
Ricoeur, Professor of Philosophy at the Universities of 
Chicago and Paris and Fellow of the National 
Humanities Center, who will read a paper entitled 



"The Problem of Time in Narrative" on Thursday, 
November 29th, at 8:00 p.m. in 204 West Duke Build- 
ing. 

DEPARTMENTS OF BIOCHEMISTRY. 

PHARMACOLOGY, AND PHYSIOLOGY 

SEMINAR 

Dr. Paul B. Lazarow, The Rockefeller University 
(NYC), will speak on "Function and Biogenesis of 
Pexorisomes" at a seminar sponsored by the Depart- 
ments of Biochemistry, Pharmacology, and Physiol- 
ogy on Friday, November 30th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 
147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee will be served 
at 12:15 p.m. in the Lobby. 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. J. Cardenas from UNC-CH will present a semi- 
nar entitled "Isoenzymes: Relatives, Friends, and 
Neighbors" on Friday, November 30th, at 3:30 p.m. in 
Room 103 Gross Chemical Laboratory. Refreshments 
will be served in the Lobby at 3:10 p.m. 

"MESSIAH" PERFORMANCE 

The 1979 annual performance of George Frederick 
Handel's "Messiah" will be presented by the Duke 
Chapel Choir on Friday, November 30th, at 7:30 p.m.; 
Saturday, December 1st, at 2:00 p.m., and Sunday, 
December 2nd, at 3:00 p.m. in the University Chapel. 
Tickets priced at $2.00. are available at Page Box Of- 
fice. Featured with the 180-member choir and the 30- 
member orchestra will be soloists Dorothy Combs, 
soprano; Meredith Marcellus, mezzo-soprano; Wil- 
liam Mitchell, tenor, and Charles Michael Smith, bass. 
J. Benjamin Smith, Director of Chapel Music at Duke 
University, will direct the three performances. 

DUKE PLAYERS PRESENTS 
"THE BEEPLE" 

Tickets are now on sale at Page Box Office for the 
Duke Players annual Children's Theatre production. 
This year's children's play is "The Beeple" by Alan 
Cullen and is scheduled for ten performances — 
Fridays, November 30th and December 7th at 8:15 
p.m., Saturdays, December 1st and 8th at 11:00 a.m. 
and 2:00 p.m. and Sundays, December 2nd and 9th at 
1:30 and 3:30 p.m. However, two performances have 
already been sold out to school groups — Saturday, 
December 1st at 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. 

The play takes place in the industrious land of Hex, 
home of the Beeple. The hero, John Willy, lands in 
Hex quite by accident but finds he is just in time to 
help Humblebee. a Berson in distress. With the aid of 
Fuzzbuzz, they set out to save Humble's beloved 
Sweebee, daughter of Queebee the ruler of Hex, from 
the clutches of Wossup the Terrible, Ornit the Horrible 
and Black Beedle. A fun-filled hour to be enjoyed by 
everyone! 

Tickets for The Beeple are general admission $2.50 
for Adults and $1.50 for children. In addition to being 



on sale at Page Box Office, they may be purchased by 
telephone using Master Charge or Visa at 684-3227 
between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Mail orders 
are also accepted by enclosing check made payable to 
Duke Players, self-addressed, stamped envelope and 
mailing to Duke Players, P. O. Box 6936 College Sta- 
tion, Durham, N. C. 27708. 

PHI BETA KAPPA INITIATION 

PHI BETA KAPPA. Beta of North Carolina, lo- 
cated at Duke University, will hold initiation cere- 
monies for new members at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, De- 
cember 4th, in the Main Gallery of the Art Museum. 
Members are urged to attend. Newcomers to the Duke 
community who are members of Phi Beta Kappa may 
affiliate with the Duke chapter by sending name, place 
and date of election, and local address to the Sec- 
retary, Box 4795 Duke Station, Durham 27706, or by 
campus mail to 401 Perkins Library. 

"AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS" 

In honor of the Year of the Child, "Amahl and the 
Night Visitors," a Christmas operetta for children, will 
be performed in the University Chapel on Thursday, 
December 6th, at 10:00 a.m.; Friday, December 7th, at 
10:00 a.m., and Saturday, December 8th, at 4:00 p.m. 
Tickets, priced at $1.00 for children and $2.00 for 
adults, are available at Page Box Office, or by writing 
AMAHL, Box 4822 Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. 

Mail requests should include the number of tickets 
and performance(s) desired, payment, and a self- 
addressed envelope for ticket return. Mail orders for 
Saturday, December 8th, will be accepted through 
November 29th. Checks should be made payable to 
Duke University. The performance is being directed 
by John Hanks and produced by J. Benjamin Smith. 

NATIONAL OPERA COMPANY 
PRESENTS "LA BOHEME" 

The National Opera Company will present La 
Boheme on Monday, December 10th, at 8:15 p.m. in 
Page Auditorium. Tickets, priced at $5, $4. and $3, will 
go on sale at Page Box Office after November 26th. 

BASKETBALL TICKETS ON SALE 

The Duke University Athletic Association an- 
nounces that tickets for the first Iron Duke Classic 
basketball tournament and for home games with Col- 
gate and Georgia Tech are now on sale to the general 
public. 

The tournament will be held at Cameron Indoor 
Stadium on December 28th-29th. The Blue Devils will 



host South Carolina, Cincinnati and Vermont in quest 
of the inaugural Iron Duke Classic crown. On Friday 
evening, Duke will meet Vermont at 7:00 p.m. and 
South Carolina will play Cincinnati at 9:00. The losers 
will meet Saturday evening at 7:00 p.m. and the win- 
ners will play for the championship at 9:00. 

Colgate will come to Cameron on January 5th, 1980, 
and new ACC member Georgia Tech will be in Dur- 
ham on January 7th. 

Tickets can be purchased at the ticket office in 
Cameron or by writing Duke Ticket Office, Cameron 
Indoor Stadium, Durham, N. C. 27706. All tickets for 
the Iron Duke Classic (all four games) are $20.00. 
Tickets to the Vermont and Georgia Tech games are 
$6.00 each. 



AMERICAN DANCE FESTIVAL 
RECEIVES CHALLENGE GRANT 

The American Dance Festival, headquartered at 
Duke University for the last two years, announces the 
receipt of a three-year challenge Grant from the Na- 
tional Endowment for the Arts. Each federal dollar 
must be matched by three dollars in contributions from 
either new sources or increased funding from previous 
donors. Funds received from January 1979 through 
December 1981 can be used as a match to release the 
designated federal dollars. According to Charles 
Reinhart, ADF president, increased subscriptions, 
sales, and contributions will produce a balanced 
budget for 1979 and help to reduce the 1978 deficit. Mr. 
Reinhart states, "Although we must raise $525,000 
within three years to meet the requirements of the ! 
grant and release the federal funds, we are optimistic 
that this challenge can be met." 

DUKE HOMESITES— HOUSE FOR SALE 

Only those homes located on lots originally de- 
veloped and sold by the University and which are stil 
owned by a member of the faculty or staff of the Uni- 
versity will be listed in the University Calendar. In- 
formation regarding listings is available from Fred E. 
Miller, 684-2054. Information about a particular house 
is available by calling the number given with the list- 
ing. 

Location: 19 Scott Place 
Phone: 489-5953 

Number of Bedrooms: Three (3) 
Number of Baths: Two (2) 
Type of heating/air conditioning: 

Baseboard heat with a wood stove and room air 
conditioners. 



DECEMBER CALENDAR 



WEDNESDAY 



10:30 a.m. Freewater 

Children's Film. 
THE MIRACLE OF 

34TH STREET " 

Also, "The 

Christmas Tree." 

Gross Chem. Aud. 

$1 50 
11:00 a.m. & 

2:00 p.m Duke 

Players: "THE 

BEEPLE " Branson. 

$2 50 Adults. $1 50 

Children 
2:00 p.m. Choral 

Program 

"MESSIAH" 

Chapel $2. 
7:00 4 9:15 p.m 

Quad Fhx HAIR 

Page $1.50 
7 30 pm Women's 

BASKETBALL 

Duke vs. ECU 



3 



6 



11 00 am. Chapel 

The Rev. Dr Thorn 

A. Langtord. 
1 30 & 3:30 p.m 

Duke Players THE 

BEEPLE " Branson. 

$2 50 Adults. $1 50 

Children 
3 00 p m Choral 

Program 
MESSIAH." 

Chapel. $2 
7 00 & 9 15 p.m. 

Quad Fhx: "HAIR 

Page $1 50. 



December 3-14 
HOLIDAY CRAFTS 
SHOP. W. Campus 
104 Flowers. 



7:00 4 9:30 p.m. 

Freewater Film: 

"WORD IS OUT 

Bio Sci 
8:00 p.m D U. U. 

PAT MATHENY. 

Page $7, $6. 



7:30 p.m 
BASKETBALL: 
Duke vs. Princeton. 



10:00 am Choral 
Program: "AMAHL 
& THE NIGHT 
VISITORS.' Chapel. 
$2 Adults: $1 
Children 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. 
Freewater Film 
"HIROSHIMA. MON 
AMOUR." Bio. Sci. 

7 00 & 9 30 p.m. BSU 
Film: "A THIEF IN 
THE NIGHT." Gross 
Chem. Aud. 

8:15 p.m. DUKE 
AMBASSADORS in 
Concert Page Aud. 
Free 



10:00 a.m. Choral 

Program: "AMAHL 

& THE NIGHT 

VISITORS." Chapel. 

$2 Adults; $1 

Children. 
7:00 & 9 30 pm. 

Freewater Film: 

"HAROLD* 

MAUDE." Bio. Sci. 
8:15 p.m Duke 

Players: "THE 

BEEPLE." Branson. 

$2.50 Adults; $1.50 

Children 
8:30 p.m. D. U. U.: 

THE GIL EAGLES 

SHOW Page $3 

Gen Pub.; $2 

Undergrads 



9 



FOUNDERS DAY 
11 00 am Chapel 

The Rev Dr Wilson 

O Weldon 
1 30 & 3 30 p m 

Duke Players THE 

BEEPLE " Branson 

$2 50 Adults. $1 50 

Children 
3 00 p.m DUKE 

DANCE GROUP 

FALL CONCERT, 

The Ark 
7 00 p.m Founders' 

Day Recital 

ROBERT PARKINS. 

Chapel Organist 

Chapel 
700& 900 pm 

Quad Fhx 

"MANHATTAN 

Page. $1.50. 



t 15 p.m. National 
Opera Company 

LA BOHEME 
Page $5. $4, $3 



11 



IS 



13 



14 



6:00 p.m Fall 
Semester Classes 
end (Under- 
graduate) 

7.00 4 9 00 pm 
Freewater Film 
"MASCULINE. 
FEMININE Bio 
Sci. 



I 15 p.m DUKE 
CHAMBER 
SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA with 
LARRY TODD, 
Piano Soloist. Page. 



7.00 4 9 15 p.m 
Quad Fhx COMES 
A HORSEMAN " 
Page $1 50 



Dec 14-20 FINAL 

EXAMS 
7 00 4 9 00 p.m. 

Quad Fhx 
VOICES Page 

$1 50. 



IB 



IT 



11 00 a.m. Chapel 
The Rev Mr Robert 
T Young 

7 00 4 9 00 p.m 
Quad Fhx "YOUNG 
FRANKENSTEIN ' 
Page. $1 50. 



24 

11:00 p.m. 
CHRISTMAS EVE 
SERVICE Chapel 



18 



25 

CHRISTMAS DAY 



19 



26 



20 



2T 



21 



28 



1100 a.m. 4 

2:00 p.m. Duke 

Players: "THE 

BEEPLE " Branson 

$2.50 Adults. $1 SO 

Children 
4:00 p.m. Choral 

Program AMAHL 

4 THE NIGHT 

VISITORS " Chapel 

$2 Adults; $1 

Children. 
500 p.m. Women's 

BASKETBALL: 

Duke vs 

UNC-Asheville 
7.00 4 9:00 pm 

Quad Fhx 
MANHATTAN." 

Page. $1.50 
7:30 p.m. 

BASKETBALL 

Duke vs. ECU. 

Cameron. 
8 00 p m DUKE 

DANCE GROUP 

FALL CONCERT. 

The Ark 
8 15 p.m Sr Recital 

DAVID LIPPS, 

trombone, 4 

DEBORAH 

GIESLER, oboe. 

EDMR Free 



15 



HANUKKAH 
10:30 a.m. D. U. 

STRING SCHOOL 

CONCERT 

Baldwin. 
3 00 p m D. U. 

YOUTH 

SYMPHONY 

Baldwin 
7:00 4 9:00 p.m. 

Quad Flix: "YOUNG 

FRANKENSTEIN " 

Page Aud $1.50. 
8:15 p.m. Dept of 

Music Faculty 

Recital CLAUDIA 

ERDBERG. Violin, 

GEORGE TAYLOR. 

Viola. JANE 

HAWKINS, Piano. 

EDMR 



22 



29 



IRON DUKE CLASSIC IRON DUKE CLASSIC 



(BASKETBALL). 

Cameron. 
7 00 pm. Duke vs 

Vermont 
9 00 pm. S. C. vs 

Cincinnati 



(BASKETBALL) 

Cameron 
7 00 p.m Losers of 

previous games. 
9:00 p m Winner 

previous games 



ol 



30 



31 



11 00 a m Chapel. 
Speaker to be 
announced. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham. North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM. N. C. 



Duke University 

calendar/ 




December 2-31, 1979 



Volume 79 



Published November 30, 1979 



Number 13 



Sunday, December 2 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. Thomas A. Langford, Dean, D. U. 
Divinity School. The Service of Worship is broadcast over 
WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus, and in the Oak Room, W. Campus Union. Open for 
faculty, staff, their families, and guests. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 

1:30 & 3:30 p.m. Duke Players: "THE BEEPLE, OR JOHN 
WILLY AND THE BEE PEOPLE." Branson Theatre. 
Adults $2.50: Children $1.50. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00 p.m. Duke Chapel Choir: "MESSIAH." Chapel. $2. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "HAIR." Conventional, 
very straight young man from Oklahoma on his way to Viet 
Nam falls in with band of hippies. Movie version of the musi- 
cal. Page Aud. $1.50. 

Monday, December 3 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
December 3-14: HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOP SALE. W. Campus 

Gallery (104 Flowers). 11:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m.. Weekdays. 
3:10 p.m. School of Engineering Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Paul M. 

Naghdi. Room 115A Engineering. 
4:15 p.m. Erasmus Club Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Inez Hedges. 

Rm. 225 Perkins Lib. 
4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: James H. Jones. 

Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
7-10:00 p.m. Auditions for ANOUILH Comedy. Duke Players. 

Branson. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m., 12:00 midnight. G-A Fed. Film: "THE STING." 

Bio. Sci. $1.50. 



Tuesday, December 4 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics & Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Ann 

Stoneburner. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. University Program in Genetics Seminar. Speaker: 

Cathy Laurie-Ahlberg. Rm. 147 Med. Sci. I. 
4:00 p.m. Council on Aging and Human Development Seminar. 

Speaker: Dr. Carol B. Stack. Rm. 1504 Gerontology Bldg. 
4:00 p.m. Mathematics Colloquium Lecture: Speaker: Prof. David 

Morrison. Rm. 132 Physics. 
7-10:00 p.m. Auditions for ANOUILH Comedy. Duke Players. 

Branson. 
7:00 p.m. JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL. Duke vs. Chowan 

Junior College. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (Love & Sexuality Series): 

"WORD IS OUT." A collage of interviews with homosexu- 
als. Discussion after first showing in Room 113. Bio. Sci. 

Free, D. U. undergrads w/I.D.'s; $1.50 others. 
7:30 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Initiation. Art Gallery Main Museum. 
8:00 p.m. D.U.U. Major Attraction: PAT METHENY. Page Aud. 

$7, $6. 
8:00 p.m. Triangle History of Science Group Lecture. Speaker: 

Prof. W. David Lewis. National Humanities Center. 



Wednesday, December 5 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

1:00 p.m. Political Science Colloquium Series. Speaker: Prof. 

Francis P. Canavan. Rm. 204 Perkins. 
4:00 p.m. VARSITY SWIMMING. Duke vs. Wake Forest. 
5:00 p.m. JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL. Duke vs. Mount 

Olive Community College. 
7:30 p.m. BASKETBALL. Duke vs. Princeton. 

Thursday, December 6 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

10:00 a.m. Choral Program: "AMAHL & THE NIGHT VIS- 
ITORS." Chapel. (SOLD) 
12:30 p.m. Depts. of Microbiology/Immunology & Biochemistry 
Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Thomas R. Broker. Rm. 143 Jones 
Bldg. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. Memorial Chapel (Duke 
Chapel). 

7:00 p.m. JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL. Duke vs. David- 
son Community College. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. BSU Film: "A THIEF IN THE NIGHT." Gross 
Chem. $1.00. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (Images of Nuclear War): 
"HIROSHIMA, MON AMOUR." A French actress meets 
Japanese architect while in Hiroshima to make a film about 
peace. Also, "H-Bomb over U.S." Bio. Sci. Free, D. U. 
undergrads w/I.D.'s; $1.50 others. 

8:15 p.m. DUKE AMBASSADORS FALL CONCERT. Page 
Aud. Free. 

Friday, December 7 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

10:00 a.m. Choral Program: "AMAHL & THE NIGHT VIS- 
ITORS." Chapel. (SOLD) 
12:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, at D. U. Prayers. Rm. 0100 Baldwin Aud. 

basement. 
12:30 p.m. Depts. of Microbiology/Immunology and Biochemistry 

Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Louise T. Chow. Rm. 147 N. H. Duke 

Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Douglas Reynolds. 

Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (Friday Night Series): 

"HAROLD & MAUDE." Burt Cort as 20-year old obsessed 

with death involved in loving relationship with 79-year old 

swinger Ruth Gordon. Bio. Sci. Free, D. U. undergrads 

w/I.D.'s: $1.50 others. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "THE BEEPLE. OR JOHN WILLY 

AND THE BEE PEOPLE." Branson Theatre. Adults $2.50: 

Children $1.50. 
8:30 p.m. D. U. U. Broadway at Duke Off-Series Performance: 

"THE GIL EAGLES SHOW." Page Aud. S3 Gen. Public: $2 

D. U. undergrads. 

Saturday, December 8 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

11:00 a.m. & 2:00 p.m. Duke Players: "THE BEEPLE. OR JOHN 
WILLY AND THE BEE PEOPLE." Branson Theatre. 
Adults $2.50: Children $1.50. 
4:00 p.m. Choral Program: "AMAHL & THE NIGHT VIS- 
ITORS." Chapel. Adults $2; Children $1. 
5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 



5:00 p.m. WOMEN'S BASKETBALL. Duke vs. UNC-Asheville. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "MANHATTAN." Woody 
Allen's best. Depicts breakdown of communications between 
the sexes among a group of N. Y. intellectuals. With Diane 
Keaton and Gershwin's music. Page Aud. $1.50. 

7:30 p.m. BASKETBALL: Duke vs. ECU. 

8:00 p.m. Duke Dance— Fall Concert. Ark. $3 adults; $1.50 
students/65 & over. 

8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music Senior Recital: DAVID LIPPS, trom- 
bone: DEBORAH GIESLER, oboe. EDMR. 

Sunday, December 9 

FOUNDERS' DAY 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
FOUNDERS' DAY CELEBRATION. Preacher: The Rev. 
Dr. Wilson O. Weldon. Broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 

11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus, and in the Oak Room. W. Campus Union. Open for 
faculty, staff, their families, and guests. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
1:30 & 3:30 p.m. Duke Players: "THE BEEPLE. OR JOHN 
WILLY AND THE BEE PEOPLE." Branson Theatre. 
Adults $2.50; Children $1.50. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00 p.m. Duke Dance— Fall Concert. Ark. $3 adults; $1.50 
students/65 or over. 

3:30 p.m. FOUNDERS" DAY ORGAN RECITAL: ROBERT 
PARKINS. Chapel Organist. Chapel. Free. 

7:00 p.m. JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL. Duke vs. Fork 
Union Military Academy. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "MANHATTAN." Page 
Aud. $1.50. 

Monday, December 10 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

8:15 p.m. National Opera Company: "LA BOHEME." Page Aud. 

$5. $4. S3. 

Tuesday, December 11 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics & Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
John G. Lundberg. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Film (Love & Sexuality Series): 
"MASCULINE/FEMININE." Callow young man and a 
free-wheeling young woman in melange of sex and violence 
set in Paris. Discussion after first showing in Rm. 113. Bio. 
Sci. Free. D. U. undergrads w/I. D.'s; $1.50 others. 

7:00. 9:00 & 1 1 :00 p.m. BOG Film: "TEXAS CHAIN SAW MAS- 
SACRE." Gross Chem. Aud. $1.50. 

Wednesday, December 12 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

7:00 p.m. JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL. Duke vs. Surry 

Community College. 
8:15 p.m. DUKE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CONCERT. Page 

Aud. Free. 

Thursday, December 13 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:45 p.m. Meeting of the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts 
and Sciences. Rm. 139 Soc. Sci. Bldg. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. Memorial Chapel (Duke 
Chapel). 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "COMES A HORSE- 
MAN." Stoic, stubborn Montana woman and WW II veteran 
fight to save ranch from cattle baron and oil company. Jane 
Fonda, James Caan. Jason Robards. Page Aud. $1.50. 

Friday, December 14 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 
12:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, at D. U. Prayers. Rm. 0100 Baldwin Aud. 

basement. 
12:30 p.m. Biochemistry and Medical Scientists Training Program 

Joint Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Emma Jakoi. Rm. 147 N. H. 

Duke Bldg. 



7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "VOICES." Aspiring 
young singer falls in love with over-protected deaf young 
woman with talent for dancing. Page Aud. $1.50. 

Saturday, December 15 

HANNUKAH 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

10:30 a.m. DUKE UNIVERSITY STRING SCHOOL CONCERT. 

Baldwin Aud. Free. 
3:00 p.m. DURHAM YOUTH SYMPHONY CONCERT. 

Baldwin Aud. Free. 
7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "YOUNG FRANKEN- 
STEIN." Parody by Mel Brooks and Gene Wilder of the 
classic horror story. Peter Boyle, Marty Feldman, Cloris 
Leachman. Page Aud. $1.50. 
8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music Faculty Recital: CLAUDIA ERDBERG, 
violin; GEORGE TAYLOR, viola, and JANE HAWKINS, 
piano. EDMR. Free. 

Sunday, December 16 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Mr. Robert T. Young, Minister to the 
University. The Service of Worship is broadcast over WDBS, 
107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, E. Cam- 
pus, and in the Oak Room, W. Campus Union. Open for 
faculty, staff, their families, and guests. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "YOUNG FRANKEN- 
STEIN." Page Aud. $1.50. 

Monday, December 17 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:30 p.m. University Review Committee on the Use of Human 

Subjects in Non-Medical Research Meeting. Rm. 215 Allen 

Bldg. 

Tuesday, December 18 
Wednesday, December 19 

Thursday, December 20 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

Friday, December 21 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

12:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, of D. U. Prayers. Rm. 0100 Baldwin Aud. 
basement. 

8:15 p.m. Durham Symphony Orchestra CHRISTMAS CON- 
CERT: University Chapel. Free. 

Saturday, December 22 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

Sunday, December 23 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Mr. Robert T. Young, Minister to the 
University. The Service of Worship is broadcast over WDBS, 
107.1 FM. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art open. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

Monday, December 24 

11:00 p.m. CHRISTMAS EVE SERVICE. University Chapel. 
(Prelude begins at 10:30 p.m.). This service will be televised 
on WTVD. Ch. 11. 

Tuesday, December 25 
CHRISTMAS DAY 

Wednesday, December 26 

Thursday, December 27 



Friday, December 28 

12:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, at D. U. Prayers. Rm. 0100 Baldwin Aud. 

basement. 
7:00 p.m. BASKETBALL: IRON DUKE CLASSIC. Duke vs. 
Vermont; S. C. vs. Cincinnati. 

Saturday, December 29 

7:00 p.m. BASKETBALL: IRON DUKE CLASSIC. Losers of 

previous games. 
9:00 p.m. BASKETBALL: IRON DUKE CLASSIC. Winners of 

previous games. 

Sunday, December 30 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Juanita B. Wright. Assistant Minister to 
the University. The Service of Worship is broadcast over 
WDBS, 107.1 FM. 

Monday, December 31 

HAPPY NEW DECADE! 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of January' 13th-20th 
(the first for the Spring Semester, 1980) will be 
Monday, January 7th, before 3:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



CHRISTMAS RECESS 

DUKE UNIVERSITY DINING HALLS 

WEST CAMPUS 

The Oak Room — Sprig will close after lunch on 
Thursday, December 20, and open for lunch on Mon- 
day, January 14, 1980. 

The Cambridge Inn will close at 2:00 p.m. on Thurs- 



day, December 20, and open at 7:00 p.m. on Friday, 
January 11, 1980. 

The Blue and White Room will close after lunch on 
Friday, December 21, and open for breakfast on Mon- 
day, January 7, 1980 at 8:00 a.m. 

Blue and White Room Hours 

Monday through Thursday, January 7-10, 1980. 

Breakfast 8:00- 9:30 

Snack Bar 9:00-11:00 

Lunch 11:30- 1:30 

Dinner Closed 

Friday, January 11, 1980 — resumes regular hours. 

DUKE FOREM CLUB 
CHRISTMAS TREE SALE 

The Christmas spirit comes early at the Duke Uni- 
versity School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. 
This is Christmas Tree Sale time for the 120 graduate 
students who make up the school's Forestry and En- 
vironmental Management (FOREM) Club. Beginning 
Saturday, December 1st, over 450 freshly-cut fraser fir 
and white pine trees and freshly-cut pine boughs, 
handmade evergreen wreaths, holly, and mistletoe will 
be available in the parking lot immediately behind the 
Biological Sciences Building on Science Drive from 3 
to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 10 a.m. to 6 
p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Members of the FOREM 
Club will be happy to trim and shape the trees to 
buyer's specifications. They can also supply informa- 
tion about storage and care of the trees for the holiday- 
season. 

This is the eleventh year that the sale has been held. 
Although more trees than ever before have been ob- 
tained, past experience indicates that they will sell out 
in less than two weeks. Therefore, the FOREM club 
officers urge area residents to ". . . come and choose 
early while the selection is best.'' They add that an 
early purchase can be kept fresh by leaving it outside 
in a tub of water in a cool, well-shaded spot and mist- 
ing it occasionally until trimming time. That's how the 
tree-growing people at Duke have been doing it for 
over ten years. 

The Christmas Tree sale is strictly non-profit. Pro- 
ceeds are used by FOREM for work-study funds, club 
activities, and charitable donations. The trees were 
raised from seedlings in North Carolina and are of two 
species native to the North Carolina mountains. The 
materials for our wreaths come from the nearby Duke 
Forest. 

"MESSIAH" PERFORMANCE 

The 1979 annual performance of George Frederick 
Handel's "Messiah" will be presented by the Duke 
Chapel Choir on Friday, November 30th, at 7:30 p.m.; 
Saturday, December 1st, at 2:00 p.m.; and Sunday, 
December 2nd, at 3:00 p.m. in the University Chapel. 
Featured with the 180-member choir and the 30- 
member orchestra will be soloists Dorothy Combs, 
soprano; Meredith Marcellus, mezzo-soprano; Wil- 



Ham Mitchell, tenor, and Charles Michael Smith, bass. 
J. Benjamin Smith, Director of Chapel Music at Duke 
University, will direct the three performances. All 
performances are sold out. Many thanks to all MES- 
SIAH patrons for making this another successful sea- 
son. 

DUKE PLAYERS PRESENTS 
"THE BEEPLE" 

Tickets are now on sale at Page Box Office for the 
Duke Players annual Children's Theatre production. 
This year's children's play is "The Beeple" by Alan 
Cullen and is scheduled for Friday, December 7th at 
8:15 p.m., Saturday. December 8th at 11:00 a.m. and 
2:00 p.m. and Sundays, December 2nd and 9th at 1:30 
and 3:30 p.m. However, two performances have al- 
ready been sold out to school groups — Saturday, De- 
cember 1st at 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. 

The play takes place in the industrious land of Hex, 
home of the Beeple. The hero, John Willy, lands in 
Hex quite by accident but finds he is just in time to 
help Humblebee, a Berson in distress. With the aid of 
Fuzzbuzz, they set out to save Humble's beloved 
Sweebee, daughter of Queebee the ruler of Hex, from 
the clutches of Wossup the Terrible, Ornit the Horrible 
and Black Beedle. A fun-filled hour to be enjoyed by 
everyone! 

Tickets for The Beeple are general admission $2.50 
for Adults and $1.50 for children. In addition to being 
on sale at Page Box Office, they may be purchased by 
telephone using Master Charge or Visa at 684-3227 
between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Mail orders 
are also accepted by enclosing check made payable to 
Duke Players, self-addressed, stamped envelope and 
mailing to Duke Players, P. O. Box 6936 College Sta- 
tion, Durham, N. C. 27708. 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING SEMINAR 

Dr. Paul M. Naghdi, Professor of Mechanical En- 
gineering, University of California, Berkeley, will 
speak on "New Results in the Theory of Elastic Plastic 
Materials" for the School of Engineering on Monday, 
December 3rd, at 3: 10 p.m. in room 1 15A Engineering. 
Refreshments will be served. 

ERASMUS CLUB LECTURE 

Professor Inez Hedges, Department of Romance 
Languages, will present a lecture to the Erasmus Club 
on Monday, December 3rd, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 226 
(Assembly Room), Perkins Library. The lecture, enti- 
tled "Dada, Surrealism, and the Alchemy of the 
Word," will be followed by discussion and an informal 
reception hosted by the Department of Germanic Lan- 
guages and Literatures. Everyone is invited to attend. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, December 3rd, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 of 
the Biological Sciences Building with James H. Jones 
of the College of Veterinary Medicine, Colorado State 



University, who will speak on "The Paradoxical Bird 
Lung — Valving without Valves." Coffee and tea will 
be served at 4:00 p.m. 

AUDITIONS FOR ANOUILH COMEDY 

Auditions for next semester's Duke Players produc- 
tion of Jean Anouilh's "Ring Round the Moon" will be 
held before the holiday recess in Branson Theatre on 
Monday or Tuesday, December 3rd or 4th from 7 to 10 
p.m. either night. No preparation is necessary and au- 
ditions are open to the entire Duke community, al- 
though Duke students are given preference in casting. 

ROUND TABLE ON SCIENCE AND 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURE CANCELLED 

Dr. John Deutch, Under-Secretary of Energy, has 
had to cancel his lecture for the Round Table on Sci- 
ence and Public Affairs, scheduled for Tuesday, De- 
cember 4th, as he will be representing President Carter 
at an international energy conference in India. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS AND 
EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Ann Stoneburner, graduate student in the Depart- 
ment of Botany, will present a seminar entitled "Crit- 
ical Ecological Factors and Taxonomic Affinities of 
Donrichardsia macroneuron: An Extreme Endemic 
Moss of West Texas" for the Plant Systematics and 
Evolution Seminar on Tuesday, December 4th, at 
12:30 p.m. in room 130 Biological Sciences Building. 

UNIVERSITY PROGRAM 
IN GENETICS SEMINAR 

The University Program in Genetics will sponsor a 
seminar, "Quantitative Genetic Variation in Enzyme 
Activities in Natural Populations of Drosophila,"' on 
Tuesday, December 4th, at 12:30 p.m. in Medical Sci- 
ences I Room 147. The topic will be given by Cathy 
Laurie-Ahlberg, Department of Genetics, North 
Carolina State University. 

COUNCIL ON AGING 
AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR 

The Council on Aging and Human Development will 
present Dr. Carol B. Stack, Associate Professor, In- 
stitute of Policy Sciences and Department of An- 
thropology, and Director, Center for the Study of the 
Family and the State, at a seminar on Tuesday, De- 
cember 4th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 1504 Gerontology 
Building. Her topic will be "All Our Families." Edu- 
cated at the University of California at Berkeley and 
the University of Illinois, Dr. Stack has a special inter- 
est in and has published extensively on the impact of 
social policies on families and children. The seminar is 
open to the public. 

MATHEMATICS COLLOQUIUM LECTURE 

Professor David Morrison, Harvard University, will 
present the Mathematics Colloquium Lecture on "De- 



generations of Algebraic Surfaces" on Tuesday, De- 
cember 4th, at 4:00 p.m. in room 132 Physics Building. 
Refreshments will be served at 3:30 p.m. in room 138. 
All interested persons are cordially invited to attend. 

PHI BETA KAPPA INITIATION 

PHI BETA KAPPA, Beta of North Carolina, lo- 
cated at Duke University, will hold initiation cere- 
monies for new members at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, De- 
cember 4th, in the Main Gallery of the Art Museum. 
Members are urged to attend. Newcomers to the Duke 
community who are members of Phi Beta Kappa may 
affiliate with the Duke chapter by sending name, place 
and date of election, and local address to the Sec- 
retary, Box 4795 Duke Station, Durham 27706, or by 
campus mail to 401 Perkins Library. 

D.U.U. MAJOR ATTRACTION 
PAT METHENY 

Pat Metheny, a D. U. U. Major Attraction, will ap- 
pear in concert on Tuesday, December 4th, at 8:00 
p.m. Tickets for the jazz guitarist's performance, 
available at Page Box Office, are $7 and $6. 

TRIANGLE HISTORY 
OF SCIENCE GROUP LECTURE 

Professor W. David Lewis, Auburn University 
(IBM Fellow of the Triangle History of Science 
Group), will present a lecture entitled "Yesterday's 
Views of Tomorrow: Science, Technology and Sci- 
ence Fiction" for the Triangle History of Science 
Group on Tuesday, December 4th, at 8:00 p.m. at the 
National Humanities Center. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
COLLOQUIUM SERIES 

Professor Francis P. Canavan, Fordham University, 
will speak on "The Classic Argument for Freedom of 
Speech Reconsidered" for the Political Science Col- 
loquium Series on Wednesday, December 5th, at 1:00 
p.m. in room 204 Perkins. 

"AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS" 

In honor of the Year of the Child, "Amahl and the 
Night Visitors," a Christmas operetta for children, will 
be performed in the University Chapel on Thursday, 
December 6th, at 10:00 a.m.; Friday, December 7th, at 
10:00 a.m., and Saturday, December 8th, at 4:00 p.m. 
Tickets, priced at $1.00 for children and $2.00 for 
adults, are available at Page Box Office for the Satur- 
day performance only. 

DEPARTMENTS OF 

MICROBIOLOGY/IMMUNOLOGY 

AND BIOCHEMISTRY JOINT SEMINAR 

The Departments of Microbiology/Immunology and 
Biochemistry will sponsor a joint seminar on Thurs- 
day, December 6th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 143 Jones 
Building. Dr. Thomas R. Broker, Cold Spring Lab- 



oratory (N. Y.), will speak on the topic "Patterns and 
Consequences of Adenoviral RNA Splicing I. Early 
Transcription and the Effects of Drugs." 

DUKE AMBASSADORS IN CONCERT 

The Duke Ambassadors will hold their Fall Concert 
Thursday evening, December 6th, in Page Auditorium 
at 8:15 p.m. The band will perform various styles of 
jazz and will feature compositions from composers 
such as Jerry Coker, Thad Jones, Herbie Hancock, 
Count Basie and Others. The Duke Ambassadors were 
organized in January of this year and are a student 
operated organization sponsored by the Duke Univer- 
sity Music Department. The band will feature a com- 
position by Rich Ruhland, the director. The public is 
invited. Admission is free. 

DEPARTMENTS OF 

MICROBIOLOGY/IMMUNOLOGY 

AND BIOCHEMISTRY JOINT SEMINAR 

Dr. Louise T. Chow, Cold Spring Harbor Labora- 
tory (N. Y.), will speak on "Patterns and Conse- 
quences of Adenoviral RNA Splicing, II. Late Trans- 
cription and Splicing Pathways" at a joint seminar 
sponsored by the Departments of Microbiology/ 
Immunology and Biochemistry on Friday, December 
7th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke 
Building. Coffee will be served at 12:15 p.m. in the 
lobby. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Douglas Reynolds, Graduate Student, Department 
of Botany at Duke, will speak on "Physiological and 
Populational Ecology of Some Annual Alpine Plant 
Species" at the Plant Ecology Seminar on Friday, De- 
cember 7th, at 12:30 p.m. in room 144 Biological Sci- 
ences Building. 

D. U. U. OFF-SERIES PERFORMANCE 
WITH GIL EAGLES 

The D. U. Union will present ESP expert and hyp- 
notist Gil Eagles on Friday. December 7th, at 8:30 
p.m. in Page Auditorium. Tickets, priced at $3 for all 
purchasers except D. U. undergrads with I.D.'s. are 
available at Page Box Office. Tickets for undergrads 
are $2. 

DUKE DANCE: FUTURE PERFECT 

Duke Dance presents its fall concert, "Future Per- 
fect" on Saturday, December 8th, at 8:00 p.m. and 
Sunday, December 9th, at 3:00 p.m. in the Ark on East 
Campus. Admission is $1.50 for students and senior 
citizens and $3.00 for adults. Please call 684-6393 for 
further information. 

The Duke Dance Group has entitled this concert 
"Future Perfect" because: the future is always ahead 
of us, it is perfect and we are not, we move in the 
direction of perfection, knowing our greatest ac- 
complishment is how we deal with the less than perfect 



present. We celebrate process over product, growth 
over finality. 

The program will consist of student and faculty 
work. Among the students, Bryce Wagner and Julia 
Menapace have been choreographing for three years 
and Peggy Rubin and Kevin Townsend for the first 
time this year. Donald Blumenfeld-Jones, dance fac- 
ulty, will present excerpts from his dance piece, 
"Sign," which is based on deaf-mute sign language 
and was created under a N. J. State Arts Council 
grant. In addition to the choreographed works, there 
will be several improvisational pieces. The other dan- 
cers in the concert are Alexandra Darrow, Jackie van 
der Horst, Karen Rowell, Corbeau Jones, and Peggy 
Norwood. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC SENIOR RECITAL 

The Department of Music will present a Senior Re- 
cital on Saturday evening, December 8th, at 8:15 p.m. 
in the East Duke Music Room. David Lipps, trom- 
bonist, and Deborah Giesler, oboist, will present a 
varied program of wind ensemble music. They will be 
joined by other music students and conducted by Paul 
Bryan. 

David Lipps, a senior psychology major, is from 
Chevy Chase, Maryland. He is an A. J. Fletcher 
scholar and plays principal trombone for the Duke 
Symphony Orchestra and the Duke University Wind 
Symphony. A student of Terry Mizesko, N. C. Sym- 
phony member and associate instructor for the Duke 
University Department of Music, David Lipps has 
performed with the North Carolina Symphony and the 
National Opera Company orchestra. After graduation 
he hopes to continue his studies in medical school. 

Deborah Giesler, a senior botany major, is from 
King, North Carolina. She is also an A. J. Fletcher 
scholar and an oboist for the Duke Symphony Or- 
chestra and the Duke University Wind Symphony. She 
has played assorted restaurant engagements in the 
Triangle area. In the future she hopes to do graduate 
work in oboe with Joseph Robinson in New York and 
later to obtain a job playing with a symphony or- 
chestra. 

The public is invited. Admission is free. 

The program follows: 



Concerto No. 3 in G minor 

Sonata. K. 292 

Petite Symphonie 

Sonata for Trombone and Piano 

Trio Sonate 

Symphony for Brass — Op. 5 



G. F. Handel 

W. A. Mozart 

Charles Gounod 

Paul Hindemith 

J. J. Quantz 

Victor Ewald 



FOUNDERS" DAY CELEBRATION 

The annual Founders' Day celebration will take 
place at the 11:00 a.m. Service of Worship on Sunday, 
December 9th, in the Duke University Chapel. The 
Service will include words of Remembrance spoken by 
the Chancellor of the University and an academic pro- 
cession of representatives from various University 
groups, including students, faculty, administrators, 
trustees, and alumni. The sermon will be delivered by 



the Reverend Dr. Wilson O. Weldon, Superintendent, 
Charlotte Area, United Methodist Church. 

FOUNDERS" DAY ORGAN RECITAL 

Robert C. Parkins, Chapel Organist, will present an 
organ recital on Sunday, December 9th, at 3:30 p.m. in 
the University Chapel as part of the Founders' Day 
Celebration. One of the selections, the Mendelssohn 
Fugue in F Minor, is an unpublished work recently 
transcribed and edited by Mr. Parkins from a manu- 
script found at Oxford University by R. Larry Todd, 
Assistant Professor in the Department of Music. This 
fugue, the subject of an article in progress by Mr. Par- 
kins and Mr. Todd, will receive its premiere perfor- 
mance on Founders' Day. 

The program follows: 

Prelude and Fugue in C Minor. S. 549 J. S. Bach 

Sonata V in C, S. 529 

Four Chorale Preludes (from Opus 122) J. Brahms 

Prelude and Fugue in G Minor 

Fugue in F Minor (Oxford version) F. Mendelssohn 

Sonata in F Minor, Opus 65. No. 1 

NATIONAL OPERA COMPANY 
PRESENTS "LA BOHEME" 

The National Opera Company will present La 
Boheme on Monday. December 10th, at 8:15 p.m. in 
Page Auditorium. Tickets, priced at $5, $4. and $3, are 
on sale at Page Box Office (Tel. 684-4059; Master- 
charge or Visa, 684-3227 between 10:00 a.m. -3:00 
p.m.) This popular Puccini opera is the story of the 
poor seamstress Mimi, the poet Rudolfo, and their 
friends in Bohemian Paris, ca. 1830. 

PLANT SYSTEMATIC S 
AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Dr. John G. Lundberg of the Department of Zoology 
will present a seminar on the general topic of numeri- 
cal approaches to systematics on Tuesday, December 
11th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 130 Biological Sciences 
Building. 

DUKE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CONCERT 

Larry Todd, pianist and assistant professor in the 
Department of Music, and the Ciompi Quartet will be 
featured artists when the Duke Symphony Orchestra 
gives a concert on Wednesday. December 12th, at 8: 15 
p.m. in Page Auditorium. Allan Bone will conduct the 
orchestra. The concert, sponsored by the Department 
of Music, is free and open to the public. 

The program follows: 
Overture to Manfred. Opus 115 Schumann 

Introduction and Allegro Appassionato. Opus 92 

Mr. Todd 

'Plite (Piece for Flute, Oboe, and Strings) J. Michael Ching 

Lynn Harmet. flute 

Deborah Giesler. oboe 

Pulcinella Suite for Small Orchestra Stravinsky 

Giorgio Ciompi. violin George Taylor, viola 

Claudia Erdberg. violin Fred Raimi. cello 

Dan Via. contra bass 

First Performance 



MEETING OF THE UNDERGRADUATE 
FACULTY COUNCIL OF ARTS & SCIENCES 

There will be a meeting of the Undergraduate Fac- 
ulty Council of Arts and Sciences on Thursday, De- 
cember 13th. at 3:45 p.m., in Room 139 Social Sci- 
ences. 

BIOCHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT AND 

MEDICAL SCIENTIST TRAINING PROGRAM 

JOINT SEMINAR 

Dr. Emma R. Jakoi, Department of Anatomy, Duke 
University Medical Center, will speak on "Ligatin: A 
Base Plate for Lysosomal Hydrolases"" for the 
Biochemistry Department and Medical Scientist 
Training Program Joint Seminar on Friday, December 
14th. at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke 
Building. Coffee will be served at 12:15 p.m. in the 
Lobby. 

D. U. STRING SCHOOL CONCERT 
AND DURHAM YOUTH SYMPHONY CONCERT 

The Department of Music will present the Duke 
University String School in concert at 10:30 a.m. and 
the Durham Youth Symphony in concert at 3:00 p.m. 
on Saturday, December 15th, in Baldwin Auditorium 
on East Campus. The public is invited, with a special 
invitation extended to young children. Admission is 
free. 

FACULTY ENSEMBLE RECITAL 

The Department of Music will sponsor a special fac- 
ulty ensemble recital by Claudia Erdberg, violin: 
George Taylor, viola, and Jane Hawkins, piano, on 
Saturday, December 15th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East 
Duke Building Music Room. Claudia Erdberg, a 
graduate of the Juilliard School of Music, has been a 
member of the Ciompi Quartet since 1973. She has 
performed in Europe at the Spoleto and Salerno Festi- 
vals. In Summer, she is a member of the faculty of the 
Downeast Chamber Music Center in Castine, Maine. 
Jane Hawkins, born in South Wales, graduated with 
distinction from the Royal Academy of Music in Lon- 
don, where she performed as soloist and with Chamber 
groups. She is pianist for the North Carolina Sym- 
phony Orchestra. George Taylor is the newest member 
of the Ciompi Quartet. He has performed with the 
Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and the Symphony of 
the New World. In April, 1979, he made a highly suc- 
cessful New York debut recital under the auspices of 
the New York City Housing Authority Symphony Or- 
chestra. 

The program will include Mozart's Duo in G., K. 
423: Prokofiev's Sonata in D, Op. 94A, and Bee- 
thoven's Sonata in A, Op. 47 ("Kreutzer "). The pub- 
lic is invited. Admission is free. 

DURHAM SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
CHRISTMAS CONCERT 

The Durham Symphony Orchestra will present its 
annual Christmas Concert on Friday, December 21st, 



in the Duke University Chapel at 8:15 p.m. The con- 
cert is open to the public without charge. 

CHRISTMAS EVE SERVICE 

The public is invited to partake of the singing, joy, 
and expectation of Christmas Eve, December 24th, in 
the Duke University Chapel. The service of Scripture 
lessons, prayers, and Christmas carols will begin at 
11:00 p.m. The prelude will begin at 10:30 p.m. 

HOLIDAY RECESS 
DINING HALLS SCHEDULES 

East Campus Dining Halls 
The Sunday dinners in the Magnolia Room will be 
served through December 16, 1979. The Magnolia 
Room will be closed for Sunday dinner until January 
20. 1980. when normal operations will be resumed. 

The Magnolia Room weekday lunches will be served 
through Thursday, December 20, 1979. Weekday 
lunch service will be resumed on Monday, January 14, 
1980. 

The East Campus Union will close for Christmas va- 
cation after breakfast on Friday, December 21st. and 
will reopen for breakfast on Thursday, January 10. 
1980, when normal operations will be resumed. 

Gilbert-Addoms Dining Hall will close after lunch on 
Thursday, December 20, 1979, and will resume regular 
hours on Monday, January 14, 1980. 

The Down Under will close after operation on 
Wednesday night, December 19, 1979, and will reopen 
on Monday, January 14, 1980. 

HOLIDAY LIBRARY SCHEDULE 

The University library facilities will be closed these 
dates: Saturday, December 22nd-Tuesday, December 
25th: Sunday, December 30th-Tuesday, January 1st. 
Schedules giving library hours are posted and distrib- 
uted. The Library Hours Only Information telephone 
number is 684-3009. 

ART MUSEUM HOLIDAY CLOSING 

The University's Museum of Art will be closed from 
Monday, December 24th through Tuesday, January 
1st. 

BASKETBALL TICKETS ON SALE 

The Duke University Athletic Association an- 
nounces that tickets for the first Iron Duke Classic 
basketball tournament and for home games with Col- 
gate and Georgia Tech are now on sale to the general 
public. 

The tournament will be held at Cameron Indoor 
Stadium on December 28th-29th. The Blue Devils will 
host South Carolina, Cincinnati and Vermont in quest 
of the inaugural Iron Duke Classic crown. On Friday 
evening, Duke will meet Vermont at 7:00 p.m. and 
South Carolina will play Cincinnati at 9:00. The losers 



will meet Saturday evening at 7:00 p.m. and the win- 
ners will play for the championship at 9:00. 

Colgate will come to Cameron on January 5th, 1980, 
and new ACC member Georgia Tech will be in Dur- 
ham on January 7th. 

Tickets can be purchased at the ticket office in 
Cameron or by writing Duke Ticket Office, Cameron 
Indoor Stadium, Durham, N. C. 27706. All tickets for 
the Iron Duke Classic (all four games) are $20.00. 
Tickets to the Vermont and Georgia Tech games are 
$6.00 each. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. William Kirkland Finley for the 
Ph.D. degree in English was held on Friday, November 16th. The 
subject of Mr. Finley's dissertation was "•William Dean Howells on 
the South and Southern Literature." The committee conducting the 
examination consisted of Professors Louis J. Budd. presiding: 
Edwin Cady, Buford Jones. Kenny Williams, and Gerald Monsman. 



sists of Professors Lucy Davis, presiding; Peter Carbone, Robert 
Ballantyne, Anne Flowers, and John Fowler. 



The final examination of Mr. David Mark Lane for the Ph.D. 
degree in Botany was held on Monday, November 26th, at 2:00 p.m. 
in Room 140 Biological Sciences building. The subject of Mr. Lane's 
dissertation was "Variation in Certain Taxa of Sphagnum from the 
Atlantic Coastal Plain." The committee to conduct the examination 
consisted of Professors Lewis E. Anderson, presiding; W. L. Cul- 
berson, Norman L. Christensen, and Kenneth R. Knoerr. 



The final examination of Mr. James William Larrick for the Ph.D. 
degree in Microbiology & Immunology was held on Friday, 
November 30th, at 9:30 a.m. in Room 415 Jones building. The sub- 
ject of Mr. Larrick's dissertation was '"Cellular and Molecular 
Studies of Human Transferrin Receptors." The committee to con- 
duct the examination consisted of Professor. Peter Cresswell, pre- 
siding; D. Bernard Amos, C. Edward Buckley. Ill, Thomas G. 
Mitchell, and Henry Kamin. 

The final examination of Ms. Ann Phifer Hammond Long for the 
Ph.D. degree in Education will be held on Monday, December 3rd at 
1:00 p.m. in Room 212 West Duke building. The subject of Ms. 
Long's dissertation is "Children's Perceptions of Peers from One- 
Parent Families."' The committee to conduct the examination con- 



The final examination of Mr. Peter Jay Sims for the Ph.D. degree 
in Physiology will be held on Tuesday, December 11th at 1:30 p.m. 
in Room 376-A Nanaline H. Duke building. The subject of Mr. Sims' 
dissertation is "Solute Flow Across C5b-9 Erythrocyte Ghosts: A 
Molecular Analysis of the Mechanisms of Membrane Damage by the 
Terminal Complement Proteins." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Peter K. Lauf, presiding, Lazaro 
Mandel, J. J. Blum, Wendel F. Rosse, and John C. Parker. 

GIFT GIVING MADE EASY 

A Holiday gift to be remembered — a special gift for 
that special person or the hard-to-buy-for: an evening 
of entertainment is available for the price of a ticket 
from Page Box Office (Tel. 684-4059; Mastercharge or 
Visa, 684-3227). Events for which tickets are now 
available are: 

THE VIENNA CHAMBER ORCHESTRA with PHILLIPPE EN- 
TREMONT 

Tues.,Jan. 29 8:15 p.m. $6. $5 
LES GRANDS BALLETS CANADIENS 

Sat.. Feb. 2 8:15 p.m. $9, $7 

SALVATORE ACCARDO, Violin Virtuoso 

Wed., Mar. 19 8:15 p.m. $4.50, $3.50 
MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING 

Fri.,Jan. 18 8:30p.m. $5.50.$4.50 
JULIUS CAESAR 

Fri.,Jan. 18 10:00a.m. $1.50Students; $2.50Others 

P. S. YOUR CAT IS DEAD 

Fri.,Feb. 8 8:30 p.m. $5.50, $4.50 
AIN'T MISBEHA VIN' 

Sun., Mar. 23 8:30 p.m. $8.50, $7.50 
WASHINGTON BALLET 

Fri..Feb. 15 8:00 p.m. $4 Stu./65 & Over; $5 Others 
(Children's Performances: Wed. &Thurs., Feb. 13 & 14. 10:00 a.m.) 
PAULINE KONER DANCE CONSORT 

Fri.,Mar. 28 8:00 p.m. $4 Stu./65 & Over; $5 Others 

All performances in Page Auditorium. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



CALENDAR 



Volume 79 



Published January 11, 1980 




January 11-20, 1980 



Number 14 



Friday, January 11 

8:30 a.m. Registration & Matriculation for New Students. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Microbiology & Immunology. Speaker: Dr. J. 

Michael Bishop. Jones Bldg. DUMC. 
12:30 p.m. Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Howard M. Steinman. 

Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
7:00 p.m. Women's Basketball: Duke vs. U. of Connecticut: 
Carolina vs. Georgia St. 

Saturday, January 12 

10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:00 noon Wrestling: Duke vs. Washington & Lee. 

3:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs UNC (TV) Cameron. 

5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

Sunday, January 13 

9:15 a.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. Student Center Chapel, 
505 Alexander Ave. Followed by light breakfast. 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Preacher: The Rev. Mr. 
Robert T. Young, Minister to the University. The Service of 
Worship is broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in the Magnolia Room. East 
Campus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & 
guests. Wine Service available after 1:00 p.m. Adults, $3.50: 
children under 12, x /i price. 
1 1:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in the Oak Room, West Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. 
Wine Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Choral Eucharist. Student Center Chapel, 505 
Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "Paper Chase.'' Timothy 
Bottoms, Lindsay Wagner, & John Houseman star in this 
drama about students trying to survive the rigors of Harvard 
Law School. Page. $1.50. 

Monday, January 14 

8:00 a.m. Spring Semester classes begin. 

9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center (Duke Chapel Base- 
ment). 

3:00-6:00 p.m. Registration for Craft Center Classes Begins in 
Northeast wing of Southgate Dorm on East Campus. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Anatomy Faculty Seminar. Speaker: Dr. J. 
David Robertson. Rm. 273 Sands Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Perkins Library Tour for Graduate Students. Perkins 
Lobby. 

4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Joseph Travis. Rm. 
Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

Tuesday, January 15 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. DROP/ADD begins. Intramural Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Harold Lebovitz, 
M.D. Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: Film Art Series: "Diary of a 
Country Priest." A young priest's solitary, uncertain pro- 
gression from grace to faith depicted in Robert Bresson's 



elliptical visual style. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free: 

Others $1.50. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Artists Series: Jean-Pierre Rampal. Flutist. Page. 

(Sold Out) 
Wednesday, January 16 
Jan. 16-18 DROP/ADD continues. 103 Allen Bldg. 8:30 a.m.-12:30 

p.m. & 2:00-4:00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. Memorial Chapel (Duke 

Chapel). 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:00 a.m. Campus Club Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Carol B. Stack. 

EDMR. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
3:00 p.m. Institute of Policy Sciences & Public Affairs. Speaker: 

Dr. Christopher Rathbone. Rm. 204 Perkins. 
5:00 p.m. Women's Basketball: Duke vs. Wake Forest. 
7:30 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Wake Forest. 
8:00 p.m. Religion & Public Affairs. Speaker: Emory Elliott, 

Princeton Univ. Alumni Lounge, Divinity School. 
Thursday, January 17 

Jan. 17-30 Student Photography. West Gallery. Flowers Bldg. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Microbiology & Immunology Seminar. 

Speaker: Dr. Robert Wells. Room 143 Jones Bldg. 
4:00-7:00 p.m. Medical History Program & the Trent Society pre- 
sents an Open Evening with John Senior, Curator, Academy 

of Medicine, Toronto, Canada. Medical History Reading 

Room, Medical Center Library. Keynote Address at 5:15 

p.m. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films. Cary Grant Series: "Bringing 

Up Baby." A fast moving screwball comedy with Katherine 

Hepburn. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others 

$1.50. 
8:15 p.m. Aging in the Eighties Lecture Series. Speaker: Dr. T. R. 

Marmor, Yale Univ. Searle Center, DUMC. Reception 7:00 

p.m. 
Friday, January 18 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open House. 
10:00 a.m. D. U. Union, Broadway at Duke: National Shakespeare 

Company presents "Julius Caesar." Page. Gen. Pub. $2.50; 

Students $1.50. 
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Department of Botany Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

Boyd R. Strain. Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Ingemar Bjork. 

Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
5:00 p.m. Women's Basketball: Duke vs. Univ. of Maryland. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. 12:00 a.m. Freewater Film: "Richard Pryor. Live 

in Concert." Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others 

$1.50. 
7:30 p.m. Gymnastics: Duke vs. Longwood College. 
8:30 p.m. D. U. Union, Broadway at Duke: National Shakespeare 

Company presents "Much Ado About Nothing." Page. 

$5.50, $4.50. 
Saturday, January 19 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
3:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. N. C. State (TV) Cameron. 
5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
6:30-11:00 p.m. Duke University Union Officer Interviews. 201 



Flowers. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "Rocky II." Can Rocky 
take the title this time? His fans will enjoy the reprise, which 
builds strongly from the doldrums of home problems to 
another brutal, bloody, rousing test of courage in the ring 
Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burgess Meredith. Dir. Stal- 
lone. Page. $1.50. PG. 
Sunday, January 20 

9:15 a.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. Student Center Chapel, 
505 Alexander Ave. Followed by light breakfast. 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. John K. Bergland, Associate Profes- 
sor of Preaching & Associate Dean for Development, Duke 
Divinity School. The Service of Worship is Broadcast over 
WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in the Magnolia Room, East 
Campus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & 
guests. Wine Service available after 1:00 p.m. Adults, $3.50: 
children under 12, V4 price. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in the Oak Room, West Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty staff, their families & guests. 
Wine Service available after 1 :00 p.m. 
12:00-5:00 p.m. and 6:00-1 1:00 p.m. Duke University Union Officer 
Interviews. Rm. 201 Flowers. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Choral Eucharist. Student Center Chapel. 505 
Alexander Ave. 

7:00 p.m. Organ Recital. David Boe, Dean, Oberlin Conservatory 
of Music. Chapel. Free. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "Rocky II." Page $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Voice Recital. Louis Auld, Baritone, Frances Evans. 
Pianist. EDMR. Free. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 3:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar). This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 

Deadline for the Calendar of January 20th-27th is 
Monday, January 14th, before 1:00 p.m. Please 
note the change in the deadline hour. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



DEPARTMENT OF MICROBIOLOGY 
AND IMMUNOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Microbiology and Immunology 
will sponsor a seminar on Friday, January 11th, at 
12:30 p.m. in Room 143 Jones Building with Dr. J. 
Michael Bishop, Department of Microbiology, Uni- 
versity of California School of Medicine (Berkeley), 
who will speak on the topic "The Origin and Function 
of Avian Retrovirus Oncogenes." 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

Howard M. Steinman, Department of Biochemistry, 
Albert Einstein School of Medicine, New York City, 
will speak on "Structure and Evolution of Superoxide 
Dismutase" for the Biochemistry Seminar on Friday, 
January 11th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. 
Duke Building. Coffee will be served at 12:15 p.m. in 
the Lobby. 

REGISTRATION FOR 
CRAFT CENTER CLASSES 

Registration for classes will be from 3:00-6:00 p.m. 
Monday-Friday beginning January 14th. The registra- 
tion deadline for each course will be 48 hours prior to 
the first class. Cancellations must be received 48 hours 
before class time to receive a refund. All class 
schedules are firm but subject to cancellation if they 
lack sufficient enrollment. Registration will be taken 
on a first-come, first-serve basis at the Craft Center 
located in the northeast wing of Southgate Dorm (East 
Campus). For more information, call 684-6213 (be- 
tween the hours of 3:00-6:00 p.m.). 

The following classes are scheduled: 

Pottery I, Monday 7-10 p.m. Feb. 4-Mar. 31 or Wednesday 7-10 
p.m. Feb. 6-Apr. 2. 

Pottery II, Tuesday 7-10 p.m. Feb. 5-Apr. 1. 

Photography I, Tuesday 6-8 p.m. Feb. 5-Apr. 1 or Tuesday 8:30- 
10:30 p.m. Feb. 5-Apr. 1. 

Photography II, Thursday 6-8 p.m. Feb. 7-Apr. 3. 

Jewelry I, Tuesday 7-10 p.m. Feb. 5-Apr. 1. 

Jewelry II, Wednesday 7-10 p.m. Feb. 6-Apr. 2. 

Quilting, Thursday 7-10 p.m. Feb. 7-Apr. 3. 

Macrame, Monday 7-9 p.m. Feb. 4-Mar. 31. 

Silkscreen on Fabric, Wednesday 2-5 p.m. Feb. 6-Apr. 9. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 
FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES 

Dr. J. David Robertson, James B. Duke Professor 
and Chairman, Department of Anatomy, Duke Uni- 
versity Medical Center, will speak on "Analysis of the 
Structure of Intramembrane Particles in the Mamma- 
lian Urinary Bladder" for the Anatomy Seminar on 
Monday, January 14th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 273 
Sands Building. Coffee and cookies will be served at 
3:45 p.m. 



PERKINS LIBRARY TOUR 

A tour of Perkins Library, the main library on West 
Campus, will be provided for graduate students on 
Monday, January 14th, at 4:00 p.m. Please meet in the 
Perkins Lobby. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

Joseph Travis, Department of Zoology, Duke Uni- 
versity, will speak on "The Ecological Genetics of 
Larval Development in Hylid Frogs'" for the Depart- 
ment of Zoology Seminar on Monday, January 14th, at 
4:15 p.m. in Room 1 1 1 of the Biological Sciences 
Building. Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Harold Lebovitz, Department of Medicine, 
Duke University Medical Center, will speak on 
"Hormones and Mans March From The Sea" for the 
Pharmacology Seminar on Tuesday, January 15th, at 
4:00 p.m. in Room 147 in the Nanaline H. Duke 
Building. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY ARTISTS SERIES 

PRESENTS 

JEAN-PIERRE RAMPAL, FLUTIST 

Jean-Pierre Rampal, the world famous French 
flutist, who has been called "the flute king" and "the 
greatest living exponent of the flute" will be presented 
by the Duke University Artists Series on Tuesday, 
January 15th, at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. His 
peerless technique and variety of sound makes phrase 
after phrase a study in beautifully shaped tone. His 
annual twelve week coast-to-coast tour of the United 
States invariably sells out. His concerts, together with 
his numerous recordings, have made him the favorite 
not only of his colleagues and critics but of an enor- 
mous young audience as well. John Steel Ritter, 
pianist and harpsichordist, has played regularly with 
Rampal in the United States and Canada since 1974. 

The program of this sold-out performance is as fol- 
lows: 

Sonata in G minor, Op. 13, No. 6 ("II Pastor Fide") Vivaldi 

Three Fantasies for Flute Telemann 

Trio Sonata in E minor, BWV 527 J. S. Bach 

Variations on La Follia. Op. 5, No. 12 Corelli 

— Intermission — 

Sonata in A minor. D. 821 ("Arpeggione") Schubert 

Sonata for Flute and Piano ( 1960) Jindrich Feld 

CAMPUS CLUB LECTURE SERIES 

The first of a series of four Campus Club lectures 
will be presented on Wednesday, January 16th, at 
10:00 a.m. Professor Carol B. Stack, Director of the 
Center for the Study of Family and State, Institute of 
Policy Sciences and Public Affairs, will speak on "All 
Our Families." The series, held in the Music Room of 
the East Duke Building, is open to the public. Tickets, 
$4 for the entire series, are available at the door. For 
further information call 489-6955. 

INSTITUTE OF POLICY SCIENCES 
AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPEAKERS SERIES 

The Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs 
will continue its speakers series concerning "The Fate 
of Social Programs in an Age of Fiscal Austerity," 
which was a monthly event during the fall semester. 
The first speaker during 1980 will be Dr. Rudolph Pen- 
ner, Director of Tax Policy Studies at the American 



Enterprise Institute, who will discuss "The 1981 
Budget" on Wednesday, January 23rd, at 3:30 p.m. in 
Room 204 Perkins Library. 

On February 21st, Ms. Suzanne H. Woolsey, As- 
sociate Director for Human and Community Affairs of 
the Office of Management and Budget, will speak in 
the Allen Building Board Room at 3:30 p.m. (This date 
has been changed from February 20.) 

The final speaker of the series for the year will be 
Dr. Frank Levy, a Senior Research Associate with the 
Urban Institute, who will speak on March 26th at 3:30 
p.m. in Room 204 Perkins. 

Professor Robert D. Behn will serve as moderator. 

In addition, the Institute will sponsor the following 
guests speaking on a variety of topics: 

Wednesday, January 16th: Dr. Christopher 
Rathbone, a journalist from Scotland who is writing a 
series of articles concerning the future of higher edu- 
cation in the United States, will speak on "American 
Higher Education Seen at a Distance" at 3:00 p.m. in 
Room 204 Perkins Library. 

Tuesday, February 5th: Geoffrey Smith, Chief 
Editorial Writer and Political Columnist for The 
Times, London, will discuss the upcoming American 
presidential elections as viewed from a British per- 
spective at 3:30 p.m. in Room 204 Perkins. 

Thursday, February 7th: Michael Novak, educator, 
theologian, columnist and author will speak as part of 
the Theologian-in-Residence program, which is co- 
sponsored by the Institute. He will speak on the rele- 
vance of religious experience on modern social 
thought at 3:30 p.m. in Room 226 Perkins. 

Monday, February 25th: Dr. Robert Nathans, Di- 
rector of The Institute for Energy Research at State 
University of New York at Stony Brook, will discuss 
"Energy and Other Crises in Developing Countries" 
at 3:00 p.m. in Room 204 Perkins. 

RELIGION AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURES 

The Department of Religion is sponsoring a series of 
Conversations with National Humanities Scholars on 
"Religion and Public Affairs: Historical and Contem- 
porary Perspectives." which are held in the Duke Di- 
vinity Alumni Lounge at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, 
January 16th. The speaker for the second lecture will 
be Emory Elliott speaking on "The Problem of Au- 
thority for the Clergy and Other Men of Letters in the 
Revolutionary Period." 

Professor Emory Elliott, who is chairman of the 
American Studies Program at Princeton, is a specialist 
in the literature and religion of the early American 
period. He has written Power and the Pulpit in Puritan 
New England and edited Puritan Influences in Ameri- 
can Literature. 

DEPARTMENT OF MICROBIOLOGY 
AND IMMUNOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Robert Wells, Department of Biochemistry, 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, will 
speak on "DNA Structure in Gene Regulation" for the 



Microbiology and Immunology Seminar on Thursday, 
January 17th, at 12:30 p.m. in Edward & Blanche 
Benjamin Lecture Hall, Room 143 Jones Building. 

MEDICAL HISTORY PROGRAM 

AND THE TRENT SOCIETY 
PRESENTS AN OPEN EVENING 

An OPEN EVENING will be presented by the 
Medical History Program and the Trent Society on 
Thursday, January 17th, from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. in the 
Medical History Reading Room, Medical Center Li- 
brary. The keynote address will be given at 5:15 p.m. 
by John Senior, Curator, Academy of Medicine, To- 
ronto, Canada. His address, "Health and Disease in 
Ancient Egypt" and "The Life of Weaver, Nacht" 
will be centered on a film of an autopsy undertaken 
recently on an Egyptian Mummy, Nacht. The discus- 
sion will raise questions on some of the problems of 
disease in Egypt today. Exhibits will cover aspects of 
medicine in Egypt and some of the ongoing studies in 
the medical history program. 

CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF AGING 

AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

25TH ANNIVERSARY LECTURE SERIES 

A Special 25th Anniversary Lecture Series on Aging 
in the Eighties will be held Thursday, January 17th, at 
8:15 p.m.. Reception at 7:00 p.m.. in Searle Center, 
University Medical Center. 

Dr. Theodore R. Marmor, Chairman and Professor 
of Public Health and Political Science. Center for 
Health Studies, Institution for Social and Policy 
Studies, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, 
will speak on "National Health Insurance: Prospects, 
Politics, and Implications for Older Americans." 

For free ticket information call Miss Betty Ray, 
919/684-2248. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 
ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Boyd R. Strain, Professor of Botany, will speak 
on "Environmental and Societal Consequences of 
Global Atmospheric CO, Enrichment: report on the 
AAAS Symposium" for the Department of Botany 
Ecology Seminar on Friday, January 18th, at 12:30 
p.m. in Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF 
BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

Dr. Ingemar Bjdrk, Institute of Medical Chemistry, 
University of Uppsula, Uppsula, Sweden, will speak 
on "Mechanism of Heparin Anticoagulant Action" for 
the Department of Biochemistry Seminar on Friday, 
January 18th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. 
Duke Building. Coffee will be served at 12:15 p.m. in 
the lobby. 

BROADWAY AT DUKE 
"MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING" 

Broadway at Duke presents The National Shake- 
speare Company in "Much Ado About Nothing" on 



Friday. January 18th, at 8:30 p.m. in Page Auditorium. 
Admission will be $5.50 and $4.50 ($2.00 discount for 
Duke Undergraduates). 

Shakespeare brings together the high wit of drawing 
room comedy and the slapstick humor of Laurel and 
Hardy. The bantering of Beatrice and Benedict in the 
ageless battle of the sexes and the low comedy of Dog- 
berry and Verges make "Much Ado" ... a comedy 
with something for everyone. 

The National Shakespeare Company, America's 
oldest touring Repertory Company, will present a spe- 
cial performance of "Julius Caesar" for high school 
students in Page Auditorium on Friday. January 18th. 
at 10:00 a.m. Tickets $1.50 for students, $2.50 for 
teachers and general public. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 
UNION OFFICER INTERVIEWS 

The University Union Board will be conducting in- 
terviews for the 1980-81 terms for the following posi- 
tions on Saturday, January 19th at 6:30-11:00 p.m., 
Sunday, January 20th, at 12:00 noon-5:00 p.m. and 
6:00 p.m. -11:00 p.m. and Monday, January 21st, at 
6:00 p.m. -11:00 p.m. in Room 201, Flowers: 

Vice President: Facilities Chairman; Finance 
Chairman; Policy Chairman; Executive Secretary; 
Program Council Chairman; Development Officer; 
Advertising Chairman; and the Chairmanships of the 
following committees: Major Attractions; Galleries, 
Performing Arts, Freewater Films; Special Events; 
Major Speakers; and Community T. V. All students, 
faculty, employees, and administrators are eligible to 
interview for these volunteer positions with the Uni- 
versity's largest service organization. For information 
call 684-291 1. Application Forms and signup schedules 
will be available at Flowers Information desk after 
January 14th. Interviews January 19th-21st. 

ARTS IN DUKE CHAPEL 
DAVID BOE ORGAN RECITAL 

The Arts in Duke Chapel will present David Boe in 
an Organ Recital on Sunday, January 20th, at 7:00 
p.m. in the Duke Chapel. The public is invited to at- 
tend without charge. Dr. Boe is Dean of the Oberlin 
College Conservatory of Music and Professor of 
Organ. His recital will include works by Scheidemann, 
Buxtehude and Bach. 

"A RECITAL OF FRENCH SONG" 

LOUIS AULD, BARITONE 

FRANCES EVANS, PIANIST 

The Department of Music presents Louis Auld, 
baritone, and Frances Evans, pianist, in "A Recital Of 
French Song" on Sunday, January 20 at 8:15 p.m. in 
East Duke Music Room. The public is invited. Admis- 
sion is free. 

Dr. Auld has given a number of recitals at Duke and 
has played lead roles with the Durham Savoyards and 
the Village Dinner Theatre. He has served as Chorus 
Master for the Duke University Opera Workshops and 
Festivals for the past three years. In addition to his 



scholarly publications. Dr. Auld is currently working 
to found LYRICA, Society for the Study of Word- 
Music Relationships. He will publish the first issue of 
the newsletter this spring. Dr. Auld holds a Ph.D. in 
French from Bryn Mawr College. 

Frances Evans received the Bachelor of Music and 
Bachelor of Arts degrees from Birmingham Southern 
College and a Master of Music in Performance from 
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She 
taught at Birmingham Southern before joining the 
Duke faculty in 1971. She has performed in many solo 
and chamber music recitals in the Triangle area as 
pianist and harpsichordist. Since leaving the Duke fac- 
ulty in 1979 Ms. Evans has been teaching privately in 
the Durham area. 
The program follows: 

I Trois Chants d' Amour Erik Satie 

(1866-1925) 
II Automne (Paul Verlaine > 

Chanson d" amour (Armand Silvestre) 
Mandoline (Verlaine) 
III O dieux. je ne sais: Air de cour & double 



Gabriel Faure 
(1845-1924) 



Air de Vertumne, from 
Pomone (Pierre Perrin) 



Anon. 

(ca. 1630) 



Robert Cambert 

(1627-1677) 

Serenade, from Le Bourgeois gentilhomme Jean-Baptiste Lully 

(Moliere — two versions) (1632-1687) 

IV Ici-bas (Sully Prudhomme) Faure 

Le secret (Silvestre) 

Sylvie (Paul de Choudens) 

V Tristesse (Theophile Gautier) Faure 

Prison (Verlaine) 
Clair de lune (Verlaine ) 
VI Three Bergerettes Anon. (18th century) 

Bergere legere 
Aminte 

Venez, agreable printemps 
VII Mai (Victor Hugo) Faure 

En sourdine (Verlaine) 
Dans les ruines dune abbaye (Hugo) 
VIII Trois melodies Satie 

La Statue de bronze (Leon-Paul Fargue) 
Dapheneo (M. God) 
Le Chapelier (Rene Chalupt, after Lewis Carroll) 



DUKE UNIVERSITY ARTISTS SERIES 
REMAINING PERFORMANCES 

The Duke University Artists Series rings in the New 
Year on Tuesday, January 15th, at 8:15 p.m. in Page 
Auditorium with the sold-out performance of Jean- 
Pierre Rampal and his magic flute. 

Tickets are available for the remaining performances 
beginning two weeks later on Tuesday, January 29th, 
with one of the busiest and most respected of today's 
virtuosi, Philippe Entremont. The French pianist- 
conductor will perform with the internationally 
acclaimed Vienna Chamber Orchestra at 8:15 p.m. in 
Page Auditorium. Maestro Entremont has received 
universal recognition of his masterful style and artistry 
both at the keyboard and/or the podium. Straight from 
Vienna, Entremont and the Vienna Chamber Or- 
chestra will perform works by Mozart and Strauss. 



Our charming Northern friends that comprise Les 
Grands Ballet Canadiens will entertain Triangle audi- 
ences on Saturday evening, February 2nd, at 8: 15 p.m. 
in Page Auditorium. The performance by the company 
will include Bejart's version of Igor Stravinsky's "The 
Firebird" followed by the classic ballet "Les Syl- 
phildes." culminating in a grand finale of McDonald's 
"Tom Ti Delam," a rousing French Canadian ballet 
embellished with classical pointwork. The Company 
regrets their inability to present the ballet "Romeo & 
Juliet" because of technical difficulties. 

Salvatore Accardo, the great Italian violinist, who 
possesses a flawless technique and a brilliance of tone 
that places him among the world's great artists will 
perform on Wednesday. March 19th. A born musician 
who made his debut at the age of 13, Accardo is an 
award winner, recording favorite and founder of sev- 
eral chamber music festivals. He has performed with 
the world's major orchestras and conductors. 

Tickets for these performances are available at Page 
Box Office between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 
p.m. Mastercharge or Visa purchases are available 
over the phone between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 
3:00 p.m. at 684-3227. For further information, please 
call 684-4059. 

COMPUTATION CENTER SHORT COURSES 

This spring the Computation Center will continue its 
series of short courses in computer programming. 
These courses will assume some programming knowl- 
edge so while you needn't be an experienced pro- 
grammer, you should be familiar with a higher level 
computer language. 

Some users will be particularly interested in the 
CMS course (CC97) which has not been offered previ- 
ously. CMS is the new general-purpose interactive 
system being developed at TUCC. 

The courses are free of charge and are open to all 
members and affiliates of the Duke community. 

All courses will meet Monday. Wednesday and Fri- 
day from 4:00-5:00. No course will be taught if fewer 
than five people enroll so be sure to register if you are 
interested. To register or to obtain more information, 
call 684-4217. 



Course No. Dates Location Instructor 

JCL CC40 Jan. 28-Feb. 15 208 Language Stone 

TSO CC91 Feb. 18-Feb. 29 227 North Grady 

BASIC CC95 Feb. 18-Feb. 29 212 North Begeman 

SCRIPT CC92 Mar. 16-Mar. 28 208 Language Tuan 

SAS CC56 Mar. 16-Mar. 28 211 Language Silver 

CMS CC97 Mar. 31-Apr. 11 227 North Stanford-Asiyo 

OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 
SHORT COURSES 

The Duke University Office of Continuing Educa- 
tion offers a variety of short courses to area residents. 
Registration is open to the public, without prerequi- 
site. The program is designed to help among others, 
those who: Promised themselves some time for per- 
sonal enrichment through study of literature, art, 



music, or political science; Intend to conquer anxieties 
about personal communications, public speaking, 
computers, or writing; Want a better 1980 by building 
new skills, dusting off old ones, learning a craft or 
starting to exercise. A descriptive brochure is avail- 
able upon request to the Office of Continuing Educa- 
tion, 107 Bivins, Duke University, Durham. N. C. 
27708, telephone 684-6259. Classes meet in daytime, 
evening, and weekend sessions. Early enrollment is 
encouraged, as many classes have limited enrollment. 

Course Teacher Time 

Masterpieces of 

Symphonic Literature Larry Todd Mon. evening 

Liberalism, Conservatism, 

and Socialism Thomas Spragens Mon. evening 

The Golden Age of Yiddish 

Literature Arthur Tilo Alt Sun. afternoon 

Understanding Nutrition 



Women in Modern Fiction 
Pre-Columbian Art of 

the Andes 
Leadership Seminar 
Dancercise 

Lost Art of Hand 
Bookbinding Resurrected 
English as a 

Second Language 
Speaking in Public 
Words as Tools 
Computer Anxiety 
Communication Skills 
GRE Informational Session 
Alternative Careers for 

Teachers 



Arthur Tilo Alt 
Joe and 

Theresa Graedon 

with Mary Bernheim Tues. evening 
Judith Ruderman Mon. morning 



Paul Clifford 
Dave Kiel 
Beverly McCraw 



Thelma George 

Mary Bobbitt-Cooke 

Gillian Plescia 

Lucy Knight 

Scott Herman-Giddens 

William Friedman 

JeanO'Barr 



Thurs. evening 

Thurs. evening 

Tues., Thurs. & 

Fri. mornings 

Tues. evening 

Mon. evening 
Mon. evening 
Thurs. evening 
Wed. evening 
Wed. evening 
Wed. night 

Sat., March 29 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. George William Seagraves for the 
Ph.D. degree in Education was held on Tuesday. December 4th. The 
subject of Mr. Seagraves' dissertation was "Integration Practices of 
a Selected Group of North Carolina Secondary School Principles." 
The committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors 
Robert A. Pittillo, presiding, William H. Cartwright. Allan S. 
Hurlburt. Olan L. Perry, and Richard H. Leach. 



The final examination of Mr. Steven Michael Sharpe for the Ph.D. 
degree in Electrical Engineering was held on Friday, December 7th. 
The subject of Mr. Sharpe's dissertation was "Two Adaptive MSE 
Estimation Algorithms." The committee conducting the examina- 
tion consisted of Professors Loren W. Nolte, presiding. Robert B. 
Kerr, Thomas G. Wilson. William T. Joines. and Bisulay Utku. 



The final examination of Mr. Horace Franklin Lawson for the 
Ph.D. degree in Chemistry was held on Monday, December 10th. 
The subject of Mr. Lawson' s dissertation was "I. Chemical and 
Spectral Studies of Multicyclic Phospholene Derivatives II. Syn- 
thetic Approaches to Phosphapentalenyl Anions." The committee 
conducting the examination consisted of Rrofessors Louis D. Quin, 
presiding, Steven W. Baldwin, Ned A. Porter, Pelham Wilder, Jr.. 
and Gerald Rosen. 

The final examination of Mr. Harry Scott Butler for the Ph.D. 
degree in English was held on Wednesday, December 12th. The 
subject of Mr. Butler's dissertation was "Sexuality in the Fiction of 
Kate Chopin." The committee conducting the examination con- 
sisted of Professors Louis J. Budd, presiding, Elgin W. Mellown, 
Bernard I. Duffey, and Kenny Williams. 



The final examination of Ms. Rachel Messina Kinicki for the 
Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering was held on Wednesday, 
December 12th. The subject of Ms. Kinicki's dissertation was 
"Performance Comparisons of Several Adaptive Least Mean 
Square Algorithms." The committee conducting the examination 
consisted of Professors Loren W. Nolte. presiding, Peter N. 
Marinos. Robert B. Kerr, Paul P. Wang, and Kishor S. Trivedi. 



The final examination of Ms. Joan Ellen MacDiarmid for the 
Ph.D. degree in Chemistry was held on Wednesday. December 12th. 
The subject of Ms. MacDiarmid's dissertation was "Synthetic and 
Mechanistic Studies With BI- and Tricyclic Phospholene Com- 
pounds." The committee conducting the examination consisted of 
Professors Louis Quin, presiding, Ned Porter. Daniel Sternbach, 
Steven Baldwin, and Seth Warner. 



The final examination of Mr. Robert Stephen Balaban for the 
Ph.D. degree in Physiology was held on Friday. December 14th. The 
subject of Mr. Balaban's dissertation was "The Coupling of Aerobic 
Metabolism to Active Ion Transport in the Kidney." The committee 
conducting the examination consisted of Professors Lazaro Mandel, 
presiding, Peter Lauf. Frans F. Jobsis, Henry Kamin, Arthur Finn, 
and Vincent Dennis. 



The final examination of Mr. Timothy John O'Neill for the Ph.D. 
degree in Economics was held on Friday, December 14th. The sub- 
ject of Mr. O'Neill's dissertation was "The Role of Private. Non- 
profit Research Organizations in Policy Formation: A Case Study of 
the Atlantic Provinces Economic Council and the Institute of Public 
Affairs." The committee conducting the examination consisted of 
Professors Craufurd D. Goodwin, presiding. J. J. Spengler, Neil de 
Marchi. and Richard Leach. 



The final examination of Ms. Anna E. K. von Mayrhauser for the 
Ph.D. degree in Computer Science was held on Monday, December 
17th. The subject of Ms. von Mayrhauser's dissertation was 
"Performance-Oriented Design of Interactive Computer Systems." 
The committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors 
William Allard, presiding, Peter Marinos, Merrell Patrick. Kishor 
Trivedi, and Robert Wagner. 



The final examination of Mr. Darrell Ray McCaslin for the Ph.D. 
degree in Biochemistry was held on Tuesday, December 18th. The 
subject of Mr. McCaslin' s dissertation was "Studies on Rodopsin in 
Detergent Solutions." The committee conducting the examination 
consisted of Professors Charles Tanford, presiding. Jacqueline 
Reynolds, Robert Webster, David Richardson, and Joseph M. Cor- 
less. 



The final examination of Mr. Jay Van Tassell for the Ph.D. degree 
in Geology was held on Tuesday, December 18th. The subject of Mr. 
Van Tassell's dissertation was "Deposition of a Carbonate Turbidite 
on the Silver Abyssal Plain." The committee conducting the exami- 
nation consisted of Professors Orrin H. Pilkey, presiding, Ronald D. 
Perkins. Bruce R. Rosendahl, Willard Grant, and Bruce Muga. 



The final examination of Ms. Mary Bryan Berry for the Ph.D. 
degree in Zoology was held on Wednesday, December 19th. The 
subject of Ms. Berry's dissertation was "The Embryological De- 
velopment of Achelia Sanayai (Ammotheidae, Pycnogonida), with 
Notes on Some Phases of the Behavior and Anatomy of the Adult, 
and on the Phylogenetic Position of the Pycnogonida." The com- 
mittee conducting the examination consisted of Professors John G. 
Lundberg, presiding, John R. Gregg, John D. Costlow, C. J. 
Bookhout, S. A. Wainwright, and Sally Hughes-Schrader. 



MEMORIAL SERVICE 

A Memorial Service for the Reverend Dr. George 
Brinkman Ehlhardt will be held in Duke Chapel at 
3:00 p.m. on Sunday, January 13. 



JANUARY CALENDAR, 



TUESDAY 
1 



WEDNESDAY 
S 



THURSDAY 

3 



FRIDAY 

4 



SATURDAY 

5 



6 



9 



lO 



11 



IS 



8:30 a.m. Registration 

& Matriculation for 

New Students. 
7:00 p.m. Women's 

Basketball: Duke vs. 

U. of Connecticut; 

Carolina vs. 

Georgia St. 



13 

11:00 a.m. Chapel. 

The Rev. Mr. Robert 

T. Young. 
7:00&9:15p.m.Quad 

Flix: 'Paper 
: Chase ." Page. 

$1.50. 



14 



IS 



8:00 a.m. Spring 
Semester Classes 
Begin. 



4:00-6:00 p.m. 

DROP/ADD begins. 

Intramural Bldg. 
7:00-9:30 p.m. 

Freewater Film: 
"Diary of a Country 

Priest." Bio. Sci. 



16 

Jan. 17-18 DROP/ADD 

continues. 103 Allen 

Bldg. 
10:00 a.m. Campus 

Club Lecture. 

Speaker: Prof. 

Carol B. Stack. 



8:15 p.m. Duke Artists 3:00 p.m. Institute of 



Series: Jean-Pierre 
Rampal. Flutist. 
Page. (Sold Out) 



Policy Sciences & 

Public Affairs. 

Speaker: Dr. 

Christopher 

Rathbone. Rm. 204 

Perkins. 
5:00 p.m. Women's 

Basketball: Duke vs. 

Wake Forest. 
7:30 p.m. Basketball: 

Duke vs. Wake 

Forest 
8:00 p.m. Religion & 

Public Affairs. 

Speaker: Emory 

Elliot, Princeton 

Univ. 



SO 



SI 



22 



S3 



11:00 a.m. Chapel. 

The Rev. Dr. John K. 

Bergland, Duke 

Univ. 
! 12:00-5:00 p.m. and 

6:00-1 1:00 p.m. 

Duke University 

Union Officer 

Interviews. Rm. 201 

Flowers. 
7:00 p.m. Organ 

Recital. David Boe, 

Dean. Oberlin 

Conservatory of 

Music. Chapel. 

Free. 
7:00& 9:15 p.m. Quad 

Flix: "Rocky II." 

Page. $1.50. 
8:15 p.m. Voice 

Recital. Louis Auld, 

Baritone; Frances 

Evans, Piano. 

EDMR. Free. 



Jan. 21-25 DROP/ADD 
103 Allen Bldg. 

6:00-11:00 p.m. Duke 
University Union 
Officer Interviews. 
Rm. 201 Flowers. 

7, 9:15 & 11:30 p.m. 
Stonehenge Film: 
"Rebel Without a 
Cause." Bio. Sci. 
$1.50. 



7:00 & 9:30 p.m. 

Freewater Film: 

"LaSalamandre." 

Bio. Sci. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. & 

12:00 a.m. AFS 

Film: "Bob, Carol, 

Ted & Alice." Gross 

Chem. $1. 
8:00 p.m. Islamic 

Religious Poetry. 

Speaker: Prof. 

Annemarie 

Schimmel, Harvard, 

Div. School 

Commons Room. 



3:00 p.m. Institute of 

Policy Sciences & 

Public Affairs 

Speaker Series. 

Speaker: Dr. R. G. 

Penner. 204 

Perkins. 
3:30 p.m. Islamic 

Religious Poetry. 

Speaker: Prof. 

Annemarie 

Schimmel, Harvard 

Div. School. 

Commons Room. 
5:00 p.m. Women's 

Basketball: Duke vs. 

Univ. of Virginia. 
7:30 p.m. Basketball. 

Duke vs. U. of 

Virginia. Cameron. 
8:15 p.m. Round 

Table on Science & 

Public Affairs. 

Speaker: 

Congressman 

George E. Brown. 

Gross Chem. 



ST 



S9 



30 



10:00 a.m. Fencing: 
Duke Men's vs. 
Maryland. 

11:00 a.m. Chapel: 
The Rev. Dr. 
Gardner Taylor, 
Concord Baptist 
Church, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quad 
Flix: "The In-Laws." 
Page. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof 'n 
Horn. "Shut Up. 
We're Singing." 
Fred Theatre. $2.50. 

8:15 p.m. North 
Carolina Chamber 
Players. EDMR. 
Tickets at door. $4. 



7:30 p.m. Women's 
Basketball: Duke vs. 
Peace College. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof n 
Horn. "Shut Up, 
We're Singing." 
Fred Theatre. $2.50. 



7:00 & 9:30 p.m. 
Freewater Film: 
"The Sound of the 
Trumpet." Bio. Sci. 

7:00, 9:00 & 11:00 
p.m. Hillel Film: 
"Operation 
Thunderbolt." 
Gross Chem. $1. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Artists 
Series: Vienna 
Chamber Orchestra 
with Philippe 
Entremont. Page. 
$6, $5. 



10:00 a.m. Campus 

Club Lecture 

Series. Speaker: 

Prof. Edwin H. 

Cady. EDMR. 
7:00, 9:00 & 11:00 

p.m. Psi Upsilon 

Film: "American 

Graffiti." Bio. Sci. 

$1.50. 
8:15 p.m. Round 

Table on Science & 

Public Affairs. 

Speaker: Ms. 

Barbara Culliton, 

Editor. Gross Chem. 



IT 

Jan. 17-30 Student 
Photography. West 
Gallery. Flowers 
Bldg. 

4:00-7:00 p.m. 
Medical History 
Program & the Trent 
Society, Speaker: 
John Senior, 
Medical Center 
Library. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. 
Freewater Film: 
"Bringing Up 
Baby." Bio. Sci. 

8:15 p.m. Aging in the 
Eighties Lecture 
Series. Speaker: Dr. 
T. R. Marmor, Yale 
Univ. Searle Center, 
DUMC. Reception 
7:00 p.m. 



24 

10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
Marson Graphics 
Inc., Exhibit/Sale. 
Flowers Lounge. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. 
Freewater Film: 
"Gunga Din." Bio. 
Sci. 



31 



Jan. 31 -Feb. 3 Black 
Student Weekend. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. 
Freewater Film: 
"The Philadelphia 
Story." Bio. Sci. 

8:15 p.m. Music 
Department Guest 
Recital. Susan 
Heaton, 
harpsichord. 
EDMR. 



18 



10:00 a.m. D. U. Union 

Broadway at Duke: 

"Julius Caesar." 

Page. $2.50 Gen. 

Pub./$1. 50 Student. 
12:30 p.m. Ecology 

Seminar. Speaker 

Dr. Boyd R. Strain. 

Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. 
5:00 p.m. Women's 

Basketball: Duke vs. 

University of 

Maryland. 
7:00&9:30 p.m. 12:00 

a.m. Freewater 

Film: "Richard 

Pryor Live in 

Concert." Bio. Sci. 
7:30 p.m. Gymnastics: 

Duke vs. Longwood 

College. 
8:30 p.m. D. U. Union 

Broadway at Duke. 

"Much Ado About 

Nothing." Page. 

$5.50, $4.50. 



S5 



3:00 p.m. Wrestling: 

Duke vs. South 

Carolina State. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. & 

12:00 a.m. 

Freewater Film: 

"Slaughterhouse 

Five." Bio. Sci. 
7:30 p.m. Gymnastics: 

Duke, U. of 

Maryland, & 

Clemson. 
8:00 p.m. Presidential 

Campaign & 

Journalists Forum. 

Cameron or Page 

TBA. 



12:00 noon Wrestling: 

Duke vs. 

Washington & Lee. 
3:00 p.m. Basketball: 

Duke vs. UNC (TV). 

Cameron. 



19 



3:00 p.m. Basketball: 
Duke vs. N. C. State 
(TV) Cameron. 

6:30-11:00 p.m. 
University Union 
Officer Interviews. 
Rm. 201 Flowers. 

7:00& 9:15 p.m. Quad 
Flix: "Rocky II." 
Page. $1.50. 



S6 



Jan. 26-Feb. 27 Marjia 
Kramer Graphics & 
Prints. East Gallery. 

10:30 a.m. Freewater 
Film: "20,000 
Leagues Under the 
Sea." Bio. Sci. 

12:00 noon Wrestling: 
Tri Meet — George 
Washington, 
Pembroke, & Duke. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quad 
Flix: "The In-Laws." 
Page. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof n 
Horn. "Shut Up, 
We're Singing." 
Fred Theatre. $2.50. 

8:15 p.m. The 
Chamber Arts 
Society presents 
the 1 FRESK Quartet 
of Stockholm. 
Searle Center, 
DUMC. Tickets at 
door. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 

Published by Duke University PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



Duke University 

CALENDAR! 




January 20-27, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published January 18, 1980 



Number 15 



Sunday, January 20 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. John K. Bergland, Associate Profes- 
sor of Preaching & Associate Dean for Development, Duke 
Divinity School. The Service of Worship is Broadcast over 
WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in the Magnolia Room, East 
Campus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & 
guests. Wine Service available after 1:00 p.m. Adults, $3.50: 
children under 12. Vi price. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in the Oak Room, West Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. 
Wine Service available after 1:00 p.m. 
12:00-5:00 p.m. and 6:00-1 1:00 p.m. Duke University Union Officer 
Interviews. Rm. 201 Flowers. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Choral Eucharist. Student Center Chapel. 505 
Alexander Ave. 

7:00 p.m. Organ Recital. David Boe, Dean, Oberlin Conservatory 
of Music. Chapel. Free. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "Rocky II." Can Rocky 
take the title this time? His fans will enjoy the reprise. Syl- 
vester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burgess Meredith. Dir. Stallone. 
Page SI. 50. 

8:15 p.m. Voice Recital. Louis Auld, Baritone, Frances Evans. 
Pianist. EDMR. Free. 

Monday, January 21 

8:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. -4:00 p.m. DROP ADD con- 
tinues with fee. 103 Allen Bldg. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Cellular & Molecular Biology Faculty-Student Seminar. 

Speaker: Dr. P. M. Conn. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg 
3:30 p.m. University Review Committee Meeting. Board Rm. 

Allen Building. 
6:00-11:00 p.m. Duke University Union Officer Interviews. 201 

Flowers 
7:00 p.m. Hoof n' Horn Tryouts for "Fiddler on the Roof." Page 

Aud. 
7:00. 9:15, & 11:30 p.m. Stonehenge Film: "Rebel Without a 

Cause." Bio. Sci. $1.50. 
8:15 p.m. Erasmus Club Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Paul Ricoeur 

EDMR. 

Tuesday, January 22 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics and Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
Richard B. Searles. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Botany Seminar. Speaker: Ms. Kareen Stur- 
geon. Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Thomas Eling. 
Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Faculty Discussion Session. Divinity School Commons 
Rm. 

5:00 p.m. Faculty Sherry Hour. Rare Book Room Perkins Library. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Communion. Memorial Chapel (Duke 
Chapel). 

7:00 p.m. Hoof n' Horn Tryouts for "Fiddler on the Roof." Page 
Aud. 



7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Freewater Films. Film Art Series: "La 
Salamandre." Directed by Alain Tanner. Starring Bulle 
Ogier, Jean-Luc Bideau, and Jacques Denis. Bio. Sci. Duke 
Undergrads w/ID Free: Others $1.50. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. & 12:00 a.m. AFS Film: "Bob, Carol. Ted & 
Alice." Gross Chem. $1. 

7:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi. Speaker: Chancellor A. Kenneth Pve. 
Rm. 202 West Duke Bldg. 

8:00 p.m. Islamic Religious Poetry Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Anne- 
marie Schimmel, Harvard Univ. Divinity School Alumni 
Memorial Common Rm. 

Wednesday, January 23 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Eugene Nester. Rm. 

147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Education Luncheon Seminar. Speaker: 

Charles Eilber. Rm. 202 West Duke Bldg. East Campus. 
3:00 p.m. Institute of Policy Sciences & Public Affairs Speaker 

Series. Speaker: Dr. R. G. Penner. 204 Perkins. 
3:30 p.m. Islamic Religious Poetry Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Anne- 
marie Schimmel, Harvard Univ. Divinity School Alumni 

Memorial Common Rm. 
3:30 p.m. Meeting of the University Review Committee on the Use 

of Human Subjects in Non-Medical Research. Board Rm. 

Allen Bldg. 
5:00 p.m. Women's Basketball: Duke vs. Univ. of Virginia 
7:30 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Univ. of Virginia. Cameron 
8:15 p.m. Round Table on Science & Public Affairs Lecture. 

Speaker: George E. Brown. Jr. Gross Chem. Aud. 

Thursday, January 24 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Oriental Art Exhibit; Sale. Flowers Lounge. 
12:00 noon Cancer Center Seminar. Speaker: Michael J. Smerdon. 

Rauch Conf. Rm. 1st Fl. Morris Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

1:30 p.m. Duke Institute for Learning & Retirement Lecture. 
Speaker: Frank King. Campus Center. East Campus. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Anatomy Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Gerald L. 
Hazelbauer. Rm. 273 Sands Bldg. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films. Cary Grant Series: "Gunga 
Din." Rousing combination of high adventure and barrack 
room comedy in 19th Century India. Bio. Sci. Duke under- 
grads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 

7:30 p.m. School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Speaker: 
Howard Lee. York Chapel Divinity Sch. 

Friday, January 25 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Alfred L. 
Goldberg. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Curtis J. 

Richardson. Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
3:00 p.m. Wrestling: Duke vs. South Carolina State. 

7:00, 9:30 & 12:00 midnight. Freewater Films. "Slaughterhouse 
Five." The sorty of Billy Pilgrim, a professional nobody, who 
becomes unstuck in time and travels from the planet Tral- 
famadore to Dresden, Germany in World War II. Bio. Sci. 
Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 



7:30 p.m. Gymnastics: Duke. Univ. of Maryland. & Clemson. 
8:00 p.m. Presidential Campaign & Journalists Forum. Page Aud. 

Saturday, January 26 

Jan. 26-Feb. 27 Marjia Kramer Graphics & Prints. East Gallery. 
9:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Duke Law Journal Symposium: "Law and 
Ethics." Moot Court Rm. Duke University School of Law. 
10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:30 a.m. Freewater Films. Children's Series: "20,000 Leagues 
Under the Sea." Classic Walt Disney version of Jules 
Verne's tale of Captain Nemo and the Nautilus, the first nu- 
clear submarine. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free: Others $1.50. 
12:00 p.m. Wrestling: Tri. Meet: Duke. Pembroke. & George 

Washington. 
5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "The In-Laws." An off- 
the-wall comedy where an unassuming dentist suddenly finds 
himself swept into adventures of a mystery man who may be 
a CIA agent or just plain crazy. Page. $1.50. 
8:15 p.m. Hoof 'n' Horn. "Shut Up, We're Singing." Fred 

Theatre. $2.50. 
8:15 p.m. Chamber Arts Society: Fresk Quartet of Stockholm. 
Searle Center. 

Sunday, January 27 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:00 a.m. Fencing: Duke Men vs. Maryland. 
11:00 p.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. Gardner Taylor, Pastor. Concord 
Baptist Church. Brooklyn. N. Y. The Service of Worship is 
Broadcast over WDBS.' 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room. East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: x h price children under 12. Wine Service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in the Oak Room. West Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
Wine Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Student Center, 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "The In-Laws." Page. 
$1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof 'n' Horn. "Shut Up, We're Singing." Fred 
Theatre. $2.50. 

8:15 p.m. North Carolina Chamber Players. EDMR. Tickets at 
door. $4.00. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 
UNION OFFICER INTERVIEWS 

The University Union Board will be conducting in- 
terviews for the 1980-81 terms for the following posi- 
tions on Saturday, January 19th at 6:30-11:00 p.m., 
Sunday, January 20th, at 12:00 noon-5:00 p.m. and 
6:00 p.m. -11:00 p.m. and Monday, January 21st, at 
6:00 p.m.- 11:00 p.m. in Room 201, Flowers: 

Vice President; Facilities Chairman; Finance 
Chairman; Policy Chairman; Executive Secretary; 
Program Council Chairman; Development Officer; 
Advertising Chairman; and the Chairmanships of the 
following committees: Major Attractions; Galleries, 
Performing Arts, Freewater Films; Special Events; 
Major Speakers; and Community T. V. All students, 
faculty, employees, and administrators are eligible to 
interview for these volunteer positions with the Uni- 
versity^ largest service organization. For information 
call 684-291 1 . Application Forms and signup schedules 
will be available at Flowers Information desk after 
January 14th. Interviews January 19th-21st. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 

Deadline for the Calendar of January 27th- 
February 3rd is Monday, January 21st, before 1:00 
p.m. Please note the change in the deadline hour. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



ARTS IN DUKE CHAPEL 
DAVID BOE ORGAN RECITAL 

The Arts in Duke Chapel will present David Boe in 
an Organ Recital on Sunday, January 20th, at 7:00 
p.m. in the Duke Chapel. The public is invited to at- 
tend without charge. Dr. Boe is Dean of the Oberlin 
College Conservatory of Music and Professor of 
Organ. 

His program will be as follows: 



Johann Philipp Krieger 

(1649-1725) 
Johann Caspar Kerll 

(1627-1693) 
Johann Gottfried Walther 

(1684-1748) 



Dietrich Buxtehude 
(1637-1707) 



Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach 
(1714-1788) 



Johann Sebastian Bach 

(1685-1750) 



Toccata and Fugue in C 

Toccata Cromatica con Durezze 
e Ligature 
Concerto in B minor (after Meek) 
Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro 

Chorale Fantasia: 

Nun freut euch lieben Christen 

g'mein (BuxWV 210) 

Sonata in D Major 

Allegro di molto 

Adagio e mesto 

Allegro 

Chorale Prelude: 

Allein Gott in der Hoh sei Ehr 

(BWV 662) 

Toccata and Fugue in F Major 

(BWV 540) 



"A RECITAL OF FRENCH SONG" 

LOUIS AULD. BARITONE 

FRANCES EVANS, PIANIST 

The Department of Music presents Louis Auld, 
baritone, and Frances Evans, pianist, in "A Recital Of 
French Song" on Sunday, January 20 at 8:15 p.m. in 
East Duke Music Room. The public is invited. Admis- 
sion is free. 

Dr. Auld has given a number of recitals at Duke and 
has played lead roles with the Durham Savoyards and 
the Village Dinner Theatre. He has served as Chorus 
Master for the Duke University Opera Workshops and 
Festivals for the past three years. In addition to his 
scholarly publications. Dr. Auld is currently working 
to found LYRICA, Society for the Study of Word- 
Music Relationships. He will publish the first issue of 
the newsletter this spring. Dr. Auld holds a Ph.D. in 
French from Bryn Mawr College. 

Frances Evans received the Bachelor of Music and 
Bachelor of Arts degrees from Birmingham Southern 
College and a Master of Music in Performance from 
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She 
taught at Birmingham Southern before joining the 
Duke faculty in 1971. She has performed in many solo 
and chamber music recitals in the Triangle area as 
pianist and harpsichordist. Since leaving the Duke fac- 
ulty in 1979 Ms. Evans has been teaching privately in 
the Durham area. 

The program follows: 

I Trois Chants d'Amour Erik Satie 

(1866-1925) 
II Automne (Paul Verlaine) Gabriel Faure 

Chanson d'amour (Armand Silvestre) (1845-1924) 

Mandoline (Verlaine) 
III O dieux, je ne sais: Air de cour & double 



Anon, 
(ca. 1630) 



Air de Vertumne, from 
Pomone (Pierre Perrin) 



Robert Cambert 
(1627-1677) 
Serenade, from Le Bourgeois gentilhomme Jean-Baptiste Lully 
(Moliere — two versions) (1632-1687) 

IV Ici-bas {Sully Prudhomme ) Faure 

Le secret (Silvestre) 
Sylvie (Paul de Choudens) 
V Tristesse (Theophile Gaulier) Faure 

Prison (Verlaine) 
Clair de lune [Verlaine) 
VI Three Bergerettes Anon. (18th century) 

Bergere legere 
Aminte 

Venez, agreable printemps 
VII Mai (Victor Hugo) Faure 

En sourdine (Verlaine) 
Dans les mines d'une abbaye (Hugo) 
VIII Trois melodies Satie 

La Statue de bronze (Leon-Paul Fargue) 
Dapheneo (M. God) 
Le Chapelier (Rene Chalupt, after Lewis Carroll) 

CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 
FACULTY-STUDENT SEMINAR 

Dr. P. M. Conn, Department of Pharmacology, 
Duke University Medical Center, will speak on 



"Mechanism of Action of Gonadotropin Releasing 
Hormone" for the Cellular and Molecular Biology 
Faculty-Student Seminar on Monday, January 21st, at 
12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. 
Coffee will be served at 12:15 p.m. in the lobby. 

UNIVERSITY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING 

The University Review Committee on the Use of 
Human Subjects in Non-Medical Research will meet 
on Monday, January 21st, at 3:30 p.m. in the Board 
Room of Allen Building. All materials (copy of re- 
search proposal, completed protocol, and completed 
federal forms, if applicable) must be submitted to the 
committee secretary, Robert Sawyer, 215 Allen 
Building, by noon on the Wednesday preceding the 
regular meeting. 

THE ERASMUS CLUB 
LECTURE BY PAUL RICOEUR 

The Erasmus Club will sponsor a public lecture by 
Professor Paul Ricoeur on Monday, January 21st, at 
8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Building Music Room. 
Professor Ricoeur, distinguished philosopher and 
critic, is currently a fellow of the National Humanities 
Center. His lecture is entitled "May Fictional Narra- 
tives be True?" An informal reception will be given by 
Chancellor Kenneth Pye following the lecture. All in- 
terested persons are cordially invited to attend. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS 
AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

A seminar in plant systematics and evolution will be 
held on Tuesday, January 22nd, at 12:30 p.m., in 
Room 130 Biological Sciences. Dr. Richard B. Searles, 
Department of Botany, will speak on "North Carolina 
Seaweeds: Biogeography and Dispersal Studies." 
Professor Searles is a recognized authority on the 
marine algae, with emphasis on continental shelf 
forms. 

SPECIAL PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Miss Kareen Sturgeon, Ph.D. Candidate, Depart- 
ment of Environmental Population, and Organismic 
Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, will speak 
on "Evolutionary Interactions Between Bark Beetles 
and Their Host Trees" for the Department of Botany 
Seminar on Tuesday, January 22nd, at 4:00 p.m. in 
Room 1 1 1 Biological Sciences Building. There will be 
a wine and cheese reception immediately following the 
seminar in the Botany Greenhouses. 

PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Thomas Eling, Laboratory of Pulmonary Func- 
tion and Toxicology, NIEHS, will speak on "Studies 
on the Biosynthesis and Metabolism of Prostaglandins 
in the Lung" for the Pharmacology Seminar on Tues- 
day, January 22nd, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 147 in the 
Nanaline H. Duke Building. 



INFORMAL DISCUSSION SESSION 
FOR FACULTY 

On Tuesday, January 22nd, Provost William Bevan 
and Chancellor A. Kenneth Pye will host an informal 
discussion session for members of the faculty. It will 
be held from 4:00-5:00 p.m. in the Commons Room of 
the Divinity School where coffee will be served. After 
the discussion, the group will adjoin to the Rare Book 
Room in Perkins Library for a sherry hour. 

KAPPA DELTA PI 

Chancellor A. Kenneth Pye will speak to Kappa 
Delta Pi on "University Planning for the Eighties," on 
Tuesday evening, January 22nd, at 7:30 p.m. in Room 
202 West Duke Building, East Campus, Duke Univer- 
sity. All members and guests are invited to attend. 

ISLAMIC RELIGIOUS POETRY 

Professor Annemarie Schimmel of Harvard Univer- 
sity, American Council of Learned Societies lecturer 
on History of Religions, will deliver two lectures on 
Islamic religious poetry at Duke University. 

The first lecture, on Islamic folk poetry, will be 
given in the Divinity School Alumni Memorial Com- 
mon Room at 8:00 p.m., Tuesday, January 22nd. The 
second lecture, on poetry in praise of Muhammad, will 
be given in the same place Wednesday afternoon at 
3:30 p.m., Wednesday, January 23rd. 

DEPARTMENT OF 
BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

Eugene Nester, Department of Microbiology and 
Immunology, University of Washington School of 
Medicine, Seattle, Washington, will speak on 
"Molecular Studies on Crown Gall Tumors" for the 
Department of Biochemistry Seminar on Wednesday, 
January 23rd, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. 
Duke Building. Coffee will be served at 12:15 p.m. in 
the lobby. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
LUNCHEON SEMINAR 

Charles Eilber, Director, North Carolina School of 
Science and Mathematics, will speak on "A New 
School for a New Century" on Wednesday, January 
23rd, at 12:30 p.m.-l:30 p.m. in Room 202 West Duke 
Building, East Campus. All interested persons are in- 
vited. Bring a bag lunch. 

INSTITUTE OF POLICY SCIENCES 
AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS COLLOQUIUM 

Dr. Rudolph G. Penner, Director of Tax Policy 
Studies at the American Enterprise Institute will dis- 
cuss "The 1981 Budget" before the Duke Colloquium 
on the Fate of Social Programs in an Age of Fiscal 
Austerity sponsored by the Institute of Policy Sciences 
and Public Affairs on Wednesday, January 23rd, at 
3:30 p.m. in Room 204 Perkins Library. 



ROUND TABLE ON SCIENCE AND 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURE 

The Honorable George E. Brown, Jr., Congressman 
for the 36th district of California, will speak on 
"Strategic Policy Planning — A Missing Ingredient in 
National Science Policy" on Wednesday, January 
23rd, at 8:15 p.m. in the Gross Chemical Laboratory 
Auditorium. Dr. Quentin W. Lindsey, Science and 
Public Policy Advisor to the Governor, will preside. 
The lecture is sponsored by the Round Table on Sci- 
ence and Public Affairs, and the public is cordially 
invited to attend. 

Members of the University community are invited to 
meet the Honorable George E. Brown, Jr., and ex- 
change views on the topic of the lecture at a coffee on 
Thursday, January 24, between 10:00 a.m. and 12:00 
noon in the Commons Room, Room 331 Sociology- 
Psychology Building. 

ORIENTAL ART EXHIBIT/SALE 

The Duke University Union Galleries Committee is 
sponsoring an Oriental Art Exhibit/Sale on Thursday, 
January 24th, from 10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. in Flowers 
Lounge. Paintings, prints, and graphics from the tour- 
ing collection of Mason Galleries of Baltimore, Mary- 
land. Marson Graphics is the largest firm in the nation 
specializing in arranging exhibitions and sales of origi- 
nal graphics at colleges, universities, art centers, and 
museums throughout the United States. 

CANCER CENTER SEMINAR 

Michael J. Smerdon, Department of Pathology, 
Washington University, St. Louis, will speak on "The 
Role of Chromatin Structure in DNA Repair" on 
Thursday, January 24th, at 12:00 noon in the Rauch 
Conference Room — 1st Floor Morris Building. 

DUKE INSTITUTE FOR 
LEARNING AND RETIREMENT LECTURE 

Frank King, member of the Mercedes Club and an 
antique car buff, presents the history of cars on Thurs- 
day. January 24th, at 1:30 p.m. in the Campus Center, 
East Campus. This is the first of the Duke Institute for 
Learning and Retirement Lecture Series of the winter 
term. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY SEMINAR 

Dr. Gerald L. Hazelbauer, The Wallenberg Lab- 
oratory, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden, will 
speak on "Transduction of chemotactic signals in Es- 
cherichia coli" for the Department of Anatomy Semi- 
nar on Thursday, January 24th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
273 in the Sands Building. 

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 
AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 

Howard Lee, Secretary of the North Carolina De- 
partment of Natural Resources and Community De- 



velopment, will speak on "'North Carolina's Domestic 
Energy Sources" for the School of Forestry and En- 
vironmental Studies on Thursday, January 24th, at 
7:30 p.m. in York Chapel of the Divinity School. He 
will discuss the use of peat, wood, solar energy and 
other sources. Lees talk is part of a series concerning 
natural resources in the Southeast. A reception will 
follow in the Varsity D Room of the Student Union. 

THE PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES 
AND JOURNALISTS FORUM 

On January 25th, the Presidential Candidates and 
Journalists Forum will be held at Duke University. 
Sponsored by the D.U.U. Major Speakers Commit- 
tee, the North Carolina Press Association, the Duke 
Law Forum, and the Institute of Policy Sciences and 
Public Affairs, this gathering will represent the first 
time that such a political event has been held at Duke 
University. 

The intent of the Forum is to provide an opportunity 
for an open and reasoned discussion of the salient is- 
sues of the 1980 campaign and all major candidates 
have been invited to participate. In addition to ex- 
pected candidate participation, the following journalists 
have agreed to serve on the panel to guide the discus- 
sions: R. W. Apple, The New York Times; William 
Greider. The Washington Post: Ferrell Guillory, The 
Raleigh News and Observer: Eugene Patterson, St. 
Petersburg Times; and Sander Vanocur, The New 
York Times. 

More than 300 members of the North Carolina Press 
Association will be gathered for this forum, as well as 
members of Duke University and surrounding com- 
munities. The event is open to the public, and will 
begin at 8:00 p.m. in Page Auditorium. 

BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

Alfred L. Goldberg, Professor of Physiology, De- 
partment of Physiology, Harvard Medical School, 
Boston, Massachusetts, will speak on "'Studies of the 
Mechanisms of Protein Degradation in Animal and 
Bacterial Cells" for the Department of Biochemistry 
Seminar on Friday. January 25th, at 12:30 p.m. in 
Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee will be 
served at 12:15 p.m. in the lobby. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Curtis J. Richardson, Associate Professor, 
School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Duke 
University, will speak on "Net Primary Productivity 
in Freshwater Wetlands: An Analysis and Comparison 
of Ecosystems" for the Plant Ecology Seminar on Fri- 
day, January 25th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 144 Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. 

SYMPOSIUM ON LAW AND ETHICS 

A Symposium entitled "Law and Ethics" sponsored 
by the Duke Law Journal will be presented on Satur- 
day. January 26th. from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the 



Moot Court Room, Duke University School of Law. 
The public is invited to attend. 

Dean Paul D. Carrington of the Duke University 
Law School will open the day with a presentation on 
"The Right to Zealous Counsel." Next, Professor Al- 
bert T. Broderick of the North Carolina Central Uni- 
versity School of Law will speak on "The Ethics of 
Constitutional Equality." Finally, Dean L. Ray Pat- 
terson of Emory Law School, Reporter for the Ameri- 
can Bar Association Commission on Ethical Stan- 
dards, will speak on "The Limits of the Lawyers' Dis- 
cretion and the Law of Legal Ethics." A roundtable 
discussion moderated by Professor George C. Chris- 
tie. James B. Duke Professor of Law, follows. The 
panelists will be Professor Martin Golding, Chairman. 
Duke University Department of Philosophy; Professor 
Arthur A. Leff, Yale Law School; The Honorable J. 
Dickson Phillips. United States Circuit Judge, United 
States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit: Mr. 
Richard Sinkfield, Member, American Bar Associa- 
tion Commission on Ethical Standards; Mr. Neil Wil- 
liams, Managing Partner, Alston, Miller & Gaines. 
Atlanta, Georgia; Professor J. Lawrence Crocker, 
University of Washington Department of Philosophy: 
and Mr. Thomas W. Giegerich, Editorial Board 
Member, Duke Law Journal. 

"SHUT UP, WERE SINGING!" 

"'Shut Up, We're Singing!", a potpourri comic 
musical revue written and produced by Duke students 
will be performed Saturday, January 26th, Sunday, 
January 27th, Monday, January 28th, Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 3rd, Thursday, February 7th, and Sunday. Feb- 
ruary 10th, in Fred Theatre on Duke's West Campus at 
8:15 p.m. 

Members of Duke's Hoof V Horn musical theater 
group have been writing and perfecting this production 
since September. Rick Lukianuk and Scott Smoot, 
both veterans of original revues, wrote the music and 
lyrics for the cast of eight. Lukianuk authored 
"Another Saturday Night," performed at Duke in 
1977. 

Tickets will be on sale at Page Box Office for $2.50. 
Free refreshments will be served at the performances. 

FRESK QUARTET OF STOCKHOLM 

The Chamber Arts Society will present the FRESK 
QUARTET of Stockholm on January 26th, at 8:15 
p.m. in the Searle Center, Duke University Medical 
School Library. Tickets will be on sale at the door at 
7:30 p.m. 

The Fresk Quartet, formed in 1965 at the College of 
Music in Stockholm, has been acclaimed around the 
world. In 1977 and 1978 it completed enormously suc- 
cessful tours of the United States. Their reception 
from audiences and critics alike has placed them in the 
top of all string quartets performing today. 

Program will be as follows: 

Quartet in D Major. Opus 76, No. 5 Haydn 

Allegretto — Allegro 



Largo: Cantabile e mesto 
Menuetto: Allegro 
Finale: Presto 
Trois Pieces (1914) 
Danse 
Excentrique 
Hymne 



Stravinsky 



INTERMISSION 



Opus Posthumous 



Quartet in D minor, 

"Death and the Maiden, 
Allegro 

Andante con moto 
Scherzo: Allegro molto 
Presto 



CHAMBER PLAYERS CONCERT 

The North Carolina Chamber Players announce the 
last concert in their 1979-80 Durham series on January 
27th at 8:15 p.m. at East Duke Music Room, Duke 
University. This performance will feature the Mozart 
Horn Quintet, Prokofieff Sonata for Two Violins, and 
the Dvorak Piano Quintet. Tickets for the concert are 
available for S4.00 at Page Box Office, the Durham 
Arts Council, or at the door. 

The Chamber Players are fresh from an exciting 
summer in association with Artsfare at Duke Univer- 
sity. During that festival, the group provided the music 
for the National Educational Television broadcast of 
the Paul Taylor Dance Company. That broadcast 
marked the first time that a North Carolina classical 
music ensemble has appeared on nationwide televi- 
sion. The audience for that broadcast was one of the 
largest ever to hear a chamber music performance. 
The New York Times termed the broadcast a "whop- 
ping success" in recognition of the superior quality of 
the production. 

COMPUTATION CENTER SHORT COURSES 

This spring the Computation Center will continue its 
series of short courses in computer programming. 
These courses will assume some programming knowl- 
edge so while you needn't be an experienced pro- 
grammer, you should be familiar with a higher level 
computer language. 

Some users will be particularly interested in the 
CMS course (CC97) which has not been offered previ- 
ously. CMS is the new general-purpose interactive 
system being developed at TUCC. 

The courses are free of charge and are open to all 
members and affiliates of the Duke community. 

All courses will meet Monday, Wednesday and Fri- 
day from 4:00-5:00. No course will be taught if fewer 
than five people enroll so be sure to register if you are 
interested. To register or to obtain more information, 
call 684-4217. 

Course No. Dates Location Instructor 

JCL CC40 Jan. 28-Feb. 15 208 Language Stone 

TSO CC91 Feb. 18-Feb. 29 227 North Grady 

BASIC CC95 Feb. 18-Feb. 29 212 North Begeman 

SCRIPT CC92 Mar. 17-Mar. 28 208 Language Tuan 

SAS CC56 Mar. 17-Mar. 28 211 Language Silver 

CMS CC97 Mar. 31-Apr. 11 227 North Stanford-Asiyo 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. James H. Jones for the Ph.D. degree 
in Zoology was held on Tuesday, December 4th. The subject of Mr. 
Jones' dissertation was "Valving of Air Flow in the Avian Lung." 
The committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors 
Knut Schmidt-Nielsen, presiding, Vance Tucker, Steven Vogel. 
John G. Lundberg. and Jacob J. Blum. 



The final examination of Mr. William Alexander Gunn for the 
Ph.D. degree in Psychology was held on Wednesday, December 5th. 
The subject of Mr. Gunn's dissertation was "Achievement Behavior 
in Executives: Motivational and Affective Correlates of Expectan- 
cies." The committee conducting the examination consisted of Pro- 
fessors Susan Roth, presiding. Clifford Butzin, Robert Carson. 
Philip Costanzo, and Roy Lewicki. 



The final examination of Ms. Doren Louise Madey for the Ph.D. 
degree in Education was held on Friday. December 7th. The subject 
of Ms. Madey's dissertation was "A Study of the Relationships 
Among Educational Linker Roles and Selected Linker Functions." 
The committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors 
Everett H. Hopkins, presiding. Robert H. Ballantyne. Peter F. Car- 
bone. Walter E. Dellinger. and Ellis Page. 



The final examination of Ms. Mary Beth Rosen for the Ph.D. 
degree in English was held on Thursday, December 13th at 2:00 p.m. 
in Room 315 Allen Building. The subject of Ms. Rosen's dissertation 
was "Beaumont and Fletcher: Moral Values and Tragicomic 
Form." The committee conducting the examination consisted of 
Professors Dale Randall, presiding, A. Leigh DeNeef. George W. 
Williams, Oliver O. Ferguson, and Gerald Monsman. 

The final examination of Ms. Roberta Mae Johnke for the Ph.D. 
degree in Physiology was held on Wednesday, January 16th. The 
subject of Ms. Johnke's dissertation was "Germination and Out- 
growth in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces Pombe." The 
committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors 
George M. Padilla. presiding. Peter K. Lauf, Thomas J. McManus. 
Joseph J. Blum, and Emma R. Jakoi. 



The final examination of Ms. Martha Montague Smith for the 
Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on Tuesday, January 22nd at 
3:30 p.m. in Room 210 in the Divinity School. The subject of Ms. 
Smith's dissertation is "Feminine Images in the Shepherd of Her- 
nias." The committee to conduct the examination consists of Pro- 
fessors Franklin W. Young, presiding. Lloyd R. Bailey. James H. 
Charlesworth. D. Moody Smith, and Orval S. Wintermute. 

The final examination of Ms. Emma Lou Swain for the Ph.D. 
degree in Education will be held on January 23rd at 2:00 p.m. in 
Room 202 of the West Duke Building. The subject of Ms. Swain's 
dissertation is "Achievement of Beginning Readers in Reading 
Comprehension." The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Anne H. Adams, presiding, Peter Carbone. Wil- 
liam Cartwight. Anne Flowers, and Robert Durden. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY ARTISTS SERIES 
REMAINING PERFORMANCES 

Tickets are available for the remaining performances 
beginning two weeks later on Tuesday, January 29th, 
with one of the busiest and most respected of today's 
virtuosi, Philippe Entremont. The French pianist- 
conductor will perform with the internationally 
acclaimed Vienna Chamber Orchestra at 8:15 p.m. in 
Page Auditorium. Maestro Entremont has received 
universal recognition of his masterful style and artistry 
both at the keyboard and/or the podium. Straight from 



Vienna, Entremont and the Vienna Chamber Or- 
chestra will perform works by Mozart and Strauss. 
Ticket prices are $6.00 and $5.00. 

Our charming Northern friends that comprise Les 
Grands Ballet Canadiens will entertain Triangle audi- 
ences on Saturday evening, February 2nd, at 8: 15 p.m. 
in Page Auditorium. The performance by the company 
will include Bejart's version of Igor Stravinsky's "The 
Firebird" followed by the classic ballet "Les Syl- 
phildes," culminating in a grand finale of McDonald's 
"Tom Ti Delam," a rousing French Canadian ballet 
embellished with classical pointwork. The Company 
regrets their inability to present the ballet "Romeo & 
Juliet" because of technical difficulties. Ticket prices 
are $9.00 and $7.00. 



Salvatore Accardo, the great Italian violinist, who 
possesses a flawless technique and a brilliance of tone 
that places him among the world's great artists will 
perform on Wednesday, March 19th. A born musician 
who made his debut at the age of 13, Accardo is an 
award winner, recording favorite and founder of sev- 
eral chamber music festivals. He has performed with 
the world's major orchestras and conductors. Ticket 
prices are $4.50 and $3.50. 

Tickets for these performances are available at Page 
Box Office between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 
p.m. Mastercharge or Visa purchases are available 
over the phone between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 
3:00 p.m. at 684-3227. For further information, please 
call 684-4059. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

CALENDARS 




Jan. 27-Feb. 3, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published January 25, 1980 



Number 16 



Sunday, January 27 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:00 a.m. FENCING: Duke Men vs. Maryland. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. Gardner Taylor, Pastor. Concord 
Baptist Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. The Service of Worship is 
Broadcast over WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
1 1:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room. East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: '/2 price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 p.m. -2:30 p.m. Sunday Dinner in the Oak Room. West Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. 
Wine Service Available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center. 505 Alex- 
ander. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: -THE IN-LAWS." An 
off-the-wall comedy where an unassuming dentist suddenly 
finds himself swept into adventures of a mystery man who 
may be a CIA agent or just plain crazy. Page. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof n' Horn. "Shut Up, Were Singing. ' Fred 
Theatre. S2.50. 

8:15 p.m. North Carolina Chamber Players. EDMR. Tickets at 

door. $4.00. 
Monday, January 28 

January 28-February 29 Canadian Art Exhibit — "Time to Draw." 
E. Campus Art Museum. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Microbiology Immunology & Students of Univ. Program 
in Genetics Joint Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Frank Ruddle. Ed- 
ward & Blanche Benjamin Lecture Hall. Rm. 143 Jones Bldg. 

4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Fred Gould. 
Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. 

7:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m. Duke Players Audition. Rm. 101 & 104 Bid- 
die Music Bldg. 

7:30 p.m. WOMEN'S BASKETBALL: Duke vs. Peace College. 

8: 15 p.m. Hoof n' Horn. "SHUT UP. WERE SINGING." Fred 
Theatre. S2.50. 
Tuesday, January 29 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Genetics 350 Colloquium. Speaker: Dr. John Lucchesi. 

Rm. 147 Medical Sciences I. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics & Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Peter 
C. Atkins. Rm. 130 Biological Sciences. 

4:00 p.m. Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Jackie Corbin. 
Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Special Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. William 
Schlesinger. Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. Aud. 

4:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. Two classes on reference resources for Art 
& Art History. East Campus Library. Reference Rm. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "THE SOUND OF TRUM- 
PETS." Poignant drama of an Italian youth starting his first 
job in a gigantic company. A neo-realist style masterpiece by 
the director of "The Tree of Wooden Clogs." Duke under- 
grads v. ID Free: Others $1.50. Bio. Sci. 

7:00, 9:00. & 11:00 p.m. Hillel Film: "Operation Thunderbolt." 
Gross Chem. Aud. $1.00. 

7:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m. Duke Players Audition. Rm. 101 & 104 Bid- 
die Music Bldg. 



8:15 p.m. Duke Artists Series presents VIENNA CHAMBER 
ORCHESTRA with Philippe Entremont. Page Aud. $6. & $5. 

Wednesday, January 30 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

10:00 a.m. Campus Club Lecture Series. Speaker: Prof. Edwin H. 
Cady. EDMR. 

12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

4:00 p.m. Department of Anatomy Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Robert 
Baker. Rm. 273 Sands Bldg. 

8:15 p.m. Round Table on Science & Public Affairs Lecture. 
Speaker: Ms. Barbara J. Culliton. Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. 
Thursday, January 31 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:00 Noon Music Dept. Noon Recital. Rehearsal Hall. Biddle 

Music Bldg. East Campus. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

1:30 p.m. DILR Cult Religions. Speaker: Ron Robinson. Campus 
Center. East Campus. 

2:00-4:30 p.m. The South and Civil Rights: The Ongoing Struggle. 
Teach-in & Workshop. Rm. 139 Social Sci. Bldg. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Memorial Chapel, Duke 
Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "THE PHILADELPHIA 
STORY." Brilliant adaptation of Philip Barry's play about an 
idle rich heiress (Katharine Hepburn) who yearns for a 
down-to-earth romance. Grant is her ex-husband, James 
Stewart is a reporter who falls in love with her. Dir. by 
George Cukor. Bio. Sci. 

8:00 p.m. Black Student Alliance presents a Cultural Arts Pro- 
gram. Page. 

8:15 p.m. Harpsichord Recital. Susan Heaton Bates. EDMR. 

Free. 
Friday, February 1 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

12:00 Noon Islamic Assoc, of D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 
0100 Baldwin Aud. Basement. 

12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Ann Chester. Rm. 144 
Bio. Sci. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Dept. Seminar. Speaker: Dr. S. Jackels. Rm. 
103 Gross. Chem. Lab. 

4:00 p.m. Canadian Faculty & Student Reception honoring the 
Consul-General, Ralph Stewart, Atlanta Consulate, at the 
Center for International Studies, 2101 Campus Drive. 

7:00. 9:30. & Midnight Freewater Films: "DONA FLOR AND 
HER TWO HUSBANDS." An erotic delight— story of a 
young woman who can't forget her dead husband. Granted, 
he was a drunk, philanderer, compulsive gambler — he was 
also a terrific lover, something her second husband clearly 
was not. Stars Sonia Braga, Jose Wilker. Mauro Mendonca. 
Dir. by Bruno Barreto. Rated R. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads 
w/ID Free: Others SI. 50. 

8:00 p.m. GYMNASTICS: Duke vs. UNC. 

Saturday, February 2 

February 2nd-8th Theologians in Residence. 
10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

1 :00 p.m. VARSITY SWIMMING: Duke vs. East Carolina M&W. 

5:00 p.m. Catholic Liturgy of Candlemas. Duke Chapel. 

7:30 p.m. WOMEN'S BASKETBALL: Duke vs. Appalachian St. 

8:15 p.m. D. U. Artists Series presents LES GRANDS BALLET 
CANADIENS. Page Aud. Tickets $9 & $7. 



8:15 p.m. Reception for Ballets Canadiens & Public following in 
Art Exhibit Rm., Page Aud., Courtesy Canadian Studies 
Center. 

Sunday, February 3 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:45 a.m. Carillon Concert, Duke Chapel By Samuel Hammond. 
11:00 A.M. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: Theologian-in-Residence Dr. Michael Novak, 
American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research. 
Washington, D. C. Canadian Hymns & Prayers for both Na- 
tions. The Service of Worship is Broadcast over WDBS, 
107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: l /i price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room. West Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

2:00 p.m. VARSITY SWIMMING: Duke vs. William & Mary. 
Women. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

4:00 p.m. CIOMPI QUARTET. EDMR. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center, 505 Alex- 
ander. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: 'SOUNDER.'" Cast: Paul 
Winfield. Cicely Tyson, & Kevin Hooks. Producer: Robert 
B. Radnitz. Dir.: Martin Ritt. A simple story of a black fam- 
ily's struggle for survival during the depression in the deep 
South. Sounder is an encouraging vision of human strength 
and love. Page. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof "n" Horn. "SHUT UP, WERE SINGING." Fred 
Theatre. $2.50. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for S3. 50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 

Deadline for the Calendar of February 3rd- 
February 10th is Monday, January 28th, before 1:00 
p.m. Please note the change in the deadline hour. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



"SHUT UP, WE'RE SINGING!" 

"Shut Up, We're Singing!", a potpourri comic 
musical revue written and produced by Duke students 
will be performed Saturday, January 26th, Sunday, 
January 27th, Monday, January 28th, Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 3rd, Thursday, February 7th, and Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 10th, in Fred Theatre on Duke's West Campus at 
8:15 p.m. 

Members of Duke's Hoof "n" Horn musical theater 
group have been writing and perfecting this production 
since September. Rick Lukianuk and Scott Smoot, 
both veterans of original revues, wrote the music and 
lyrics for the cast of eight. Lukianuk authored 
"Another Saturday Night," performed at Duke in 
1977. 

Tickets will be on sale at Page Box Office for $2.50. 
Free refreshments will be served at the performances. 

N. C. CHAMBER PLAYERS CONCERT 

The North Carolina Chamber Players announce the 
last concert in their 1979-80 Durham series on January 
27th at 8:15 p.m. at East Duke Music Room, Duke 
University. This performance will feature the Mozart 
Horn Quintet, Prokofieff Sonata for Two Violins, and 
the Dvorak Piano Quintet. Tickets for the concert are 
available for $4.00 at Page Box Office, the Durham 
Arts Council, or at the door. 

The Chamber Players are fresh from an exciting 
summer in association with Artsfare at Duke Univer- 
sity. During that festival, the group provided the music 
for the National Educational Television broadcast of 
the Paul Taylor Dance Company. That broadcast 
marked the first time that a North Carolina classical 
music ensemble has appeared on nationwide televi- 
sion. The audience for that broadcast was one of the 
largest ever to hear a chamber music performance. 
The New York Times termed the broadcast a "whop- 
ping success" in recognition of the superior quality of 
the production. 

MICROBIOLOGY/IMMUNOLOGY/GENETICS 
JOINT SEMINAR 

Dr. Frank Ruddle, Department of Biology, Yale 
University, New Haven, Connecticut, will speak on 
"Mechanisms of Gene Transfer in Mammalian Cells" 
for the Department of Microbiology and Immunology 
and Students of the University Program in Genetics 
Seminar on Monday, January 28th, at 12:30 p.m. in 
Edward & Blanche Benjamin Lecture Hall, Room 143 
Jones Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Fred Gould, Department of Entomology, North 
Carolina State University, will speak on "Ecological 
Genetics and Agricultural Pest Management" on 
Monday, January 28th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 
Biological Sciences Building. Coffee and tea will be 
served at 4:00 p.m. 



DUKE PLAYERS AUDITION 

Duke Players will hold open auditions for three 
Spring productions on Monday and Tuesday. January 
28th and 29th from 7-10 p.m. either evening in Rooms 
101 and 104 Biddle Music Building (next to Branson 
Theatre on the East Campus). Being produced are Lil- 
lian Hellman's Toys in the Attic and the premieres of 
two new plays by Duke playwrights Barry George and 
Scott Smoot. 

Those interested in auditioning may choose to at- 
tend either Monday or Tuesday's auditions, they may 
audition for one or all of the plays, and they need not 
have prepared any audition material. However, the di- 
rector of Toys in the Attic is offering the option of 
presenting a prepared reading. For further details, stop 
by Branson Theatre or phone Duke Players at 684- 
3181. 

GENETICS COLLOQUIUM 

Dr. John Lucchesi, Department of Zoology, Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, will speak on 
"Dosage Compensation and Evolution of Sex 
Chromosomes'" for the Genetics 350 Colloquium on 
Tuesday. January 29th. and February 5th, at 12:30 
p.m. in Room 147 Medical Sciences I. Dr. Lucchesi's 
lectures are the first of three groups of our lectures in 
Genetics 350 this Spring. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS 
AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

A seminar in plant systematics and evolution will be 
held on Tuesday, January 29th, at 12:30 p.m.. in Room 
130 Biological Sciences. Mr. Peter C. Atkins, Hor- 
ticulturist, Department of Botany will speak on "Hor- 
ticultural Travels." Mr. Atkins, holder of the degree in 
horticulture from the University of Massachusetts, is 
pursuing graduate work at North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. Currently he is in charge of the Department's 
greenhouse teaching, research, and display facilities. 

PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Jackie Corbin, Department of Physiology, Van- 
derbilt University, will speak on "Structures and 
Functions of Cyclic AMP Dependent Protein Kinase" 
for the Pharmacology Seminar on Tuesday, January 
29th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 147 in the Nanaline H. 
Duke Building. 

SPECIAL PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. William Schlesinger, Department of Biological 
Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, 
California, will speak on "Demography of Coenothits 
Chaparral and the Role of Water, Light, and Nutrients 
in Determining Community Structure" for the De- 
partment of Botany Seminar on Tuesday, January 
29th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 111 Biological Sciences 
Auditorium. Wine and cheese reception immediately 
following the seminar in the Botany Greenhouses. 



ART AND ART HISTORY CLASSES 

Two classes on reference resources for art and art 
history will be offered by Edith Hassold. Art Libra- 
rian, in the East Campus Library, Reference Room at 
4:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, January 29th. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY ARTISTS SERIES 
REMAINING PERFORMANCES 

The Duke University Artists Series remaining per- 
formances will begin Tuesday, January 29th, with one 
of the busiest and most respected of today's virtuosi, 
Philippe Entremont. The French pianist-conductor 
will perform with the internationally acclaimed Vienna 
Chamber Orchestra at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. 
Maestro Entremont has received universal recognition 
of his masterful style and artistry both at the keyboard 
and/or the podium. Straight from Vienna. Entremont 
and the Vienna Chamber Orchestra will perform works 
by Mozart and Strauss. 

Our charming Northern friends that comprise Les 
Grands Ballet Canadiens will entertain Triangle audi- 
ences on Saturday evening, February 2nd. at 8:15 p.m. 
in Page Auditorium. The performance by the company 
will include Bejart's version of Igor Stravinsky's "The 
Firebird" followed by the classic ballet "Les Syl- 
phildes," culminating in a grand finale of McDonald's 
"Tom Ti Delam," a rousing French Canadian ballet 
embellished with classical pointwork. The Company 
regrets their inability to present the ballet "Romeo & 
Juliet" because of technical difficulties. 

Salvatore Accardo, the great Italian violinist, who 
possesses a flawless technique and a brilliance of tone 
that places him among the world's great artists will 
perform on Wednesday, March 19th. A born musician 
who made his debut at the age of 13, Accardo is an 
award winner, recording favorite and founder of sev- 
eral chamber music festivals. He has performed with 
the world's major orchestras and conductors. 

Tickets for these performances are available at Page 
Box Office between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 
p.m. Mastercharge or Visa purchases are available 
over the phone between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 
3:00 p.m. at 684-3227. For further information, please 
call 684-4059. 



CAMPUS CLUB LECTURE SERIES 

Professor Edwin H. Cady will speak on "The 
Aesthetics of Intercollegiate Athletics" on Wednes- 
day, January 30th, at 10:00 a.m. Second in a series of 
four speakers. Professor Cady's lecture will be pre- 
sented in the Music Room of the East Duke Building. 
The lecture is open to the public. Tickets, S4. for the 
series, may be purchased at the door. For further in- 
formation call 489-6955. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY SEMINAR 

Dr. Robert Baker. Department of Physiology and 
Biophysics. New York University Medical Center, 
New York, New York, will speak on " Correlation 
Between Single Cell Morphology and Physiology in 
the Oculomotor System of the Alert Cat" for the De- 
partment of Anatomy Seminar on Wednesday, 
January 30th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 273 Sands Build- 
ing. Coffee and cookies will be served at 3:45 p.m. 



ROUND TABLE ON SCIENCE AND 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURE 

Ms. Barbara J. Culliton, News Editor for Science 
magazine, will speak on "Science Policy and the 
Washington Press" on Wednesday, January 30th, at 
8:15 p.m. in the Gross Chemical Laboratory Au- 
ditorium. Dr. Robert L. Hill, James B. Duke Professor 
of Biochemistry, will preside. The lecture is sponsored 
by the Round Table on Science and Public Affairs, and 
the public is cordially invited to attend. 

Members of the University community are invited to 
meet Ms. Culliton and exchange views on the topic of 
the lecture at a coffee on Thursday, January 31st, be- 
tween 10:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon in the Commons 
Room, Room 331 Sociology-Psychology Building. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT NOON RECITAL 

The Music Department Noon Recital will present 
John Sperry, (Sr.) cellist, and the Ciompi Quartet at 
noon on Thursday, January 31st, Rehearsal Hall, Bid- 
die Music Building, East Campus. Their programs 
follow: 
John Sperry, Cellist: 

Suite #2 in d minor for Cello J. S. Bach 

Prelude 
Allemande 
Courante 
Minuets I & II 
Gigue 

Ciompi Quartet: 

Quartet in C. Op. 54 #2 Joseph Haydn 

Vivace 

Adagio 

Menuetto: Allegretto 

Finale: Adagio; Presto: Adagio 



THE SOUTH AND CIVIL RIGHTS 

THE ONGOING STRUGGLE 

A UNIVERSITY TEACH-IN AND WORKSHOP 

On Thursday, January 31st, there will be a univer- 
sity teach-in and workshop on the subject of "The 
South and Civil Rights: The Ongoing Struggle." It will 
be held in Room 139 Social Sciences Building from 
2:00-4:30 p.m. The teach-in will address the following 
topics: 



Heritage of Change — The Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s 
The Greensboro Sit-in of 1960 
Struggle in the Deep South: Birmingham. 1963 
Change and Resistance — Why The Ku Mux Klan? 
The First Klan— Did it Work 1 
The Ku Klux Klan of Today: Why they Fight 
Present Times, Future Directions 
The November Shootings: Greensboro, 1979 
Agenda for the Future 

Speakers for the teach-in will include Professor Wil- 
liam Chafe. Duke historian and author of Civility and 
Civil Rights, a new history of the Greensboro sit-ins of 
1960: Reverend L. C. Whelchel, Pastor of the Russell 
Memorial CME Church and veteran of the 1963 dem- 
onstrations in Birmingham; Professor Sydney Nathans 
of Duke; Dr. Tony Whitehead of the Department of 
Health Education at UNC: and Dr. Marty Nathan, 
widow of Dr. Michael Nathan, a Duke MD and 
member of the communist Workers Party who was 
slain at Greensboro in November. After the speaker 
presentations and discussion, the group will break up 
into informal workshops to continue discussion of the 
issues of the teach-in. 

•HARPSICHORD RECITAL" 
SUSAN HEATON BATES 

The Duke University Department of Music will pre- 
sent a recital on the Dowd Harpsichord by guest artist, 
Susan Heaton Bates, on Thursday, January 31st. at 
8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. The program 
will include works by J. S. Bach, Frescobaldi, 
Rameau, Scarlatti and Schutz. The public is invited. 
Admission is free. 

Susan Heaton Bates holds the B.M. degree from 
Salem College and the M.M.A. degree from Yale Uni- 
versity. Currently she teaches at Salem College, is an 
accompanist at Wake Forest University, and serves as 
organist at Home Moravian Church in Winston-Salem. 
Her harpsichord teachers have been John S. Mueller 
and Richard Rephann. 

The program follows: 
Toccata Ottava (Libra prima) Girolamo Frescobaldi 

(1583-1643) 
•Jubilate Deo."" SWV 332 Heinrich Schutz 

(Kleine geistiiche Konzerte) (1585-1672) 

Frieda Holland Skillington. soprano 

Nancy Staples, alto 

James Bates, tenor 

Howard Skillington, bass 

Molly Johnston, viola da gamba 

Sonata in E-Flat. K. 370 Domenico Scarlatti 

Sonata in E-Flat. K. 371 (1685-1757) 

Sonata in E, K. 380 

Sonata in E. K. 381 

English Suite in A Minor Johann Sebastian Bach 

Prelude (1685-1750) 

Allemande 

Courante 

Sarabande 

Bourree I and II 

Gigue 
Prelude and Fugue in A Major 

(Weil-Tempered Clavier. Book II) 
Pieces de Clavecin Jean-Philippe Rameau 

Les Tendres Plaintes (1683-1764) 



Les Niais de Sologne 
Les Soupirs 
La Joyeuse 
La Follette 

LEntretien des Muses 
. Les Tourbillons 
Les Cyclopes 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Ann Chester, Graduate Student, Botany Depart- 
ment, Duke University, will speak on "Reproductive 
Effort and Seedling Establishment in Cottongrass Tus- 
sock Tundra" for the Plant Ecology Seminar on Fri- 
day, February 1st, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 144 Biologi- 
cal Sciences Building. 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. S. Jackels from Wake Forest University will 
present a seminar entitled "Metal Complexes of Tet- 
raimine Macrocycles" on Friday, February 1st, at 3:30 
p.m. in Room 103 Gross Chemical Laboratory. Re- 
freshments will be served in the Lobby at 3:10 p.m. 

THEOLOGIANS IN RESIDENCE 

Dr. Michael Novak, teacher, columnist, theologian 
and resident scholar at the American Enterprise Insti- 
tute, and Karen Laub Novak, teacher, writer and artist 
will be theologians in residence February 2nd-8th. 

Their schedule's follow: 

Michael Novak's 
Schedule 

Sunday. February 3. 1980 
9:30 a.m. Catholic Mass 

11:00 a.m. Preach in Chapel — "The Experience of Nothingness" 
5:30 p.m. Lutheran & United Methodist Groups 

•'Election— 1980"" 
Monday, February 4, 1980 

7:30 p.m. Page Auditorium — "The War of Ideas: The Theology 
of Democratic Capitalism" 
Tuesday. February 5, 1980 
1:00 p.m. Law Forum — Pilgrimage from Liberalism to Conser- 
vatism 
4:00 p.m. Chronicle Panel — Tim Foote. Time Magazine: 

Joann Omang Washington Post: and Novak 
5:30 p.m. Reception 
Wednesday, February 6. 1980 
11:30 a.m. Divinity School Chapel 

Service — Preach 
Thursday. February 7. 1980 
1:30 p.m. Duke Institute for Learning 

3:00 p.m. In Retirement "Journey from Liberalism to Conser- 
vatism" 
Friday. February 8. 1980 
6:00 p.m. Community II & BSU 

"Impact of Religion on Politics 
Karen Laub Novak's 
Schedule 

Sunday. February 3 
3:00 p.m. Galleries Committee: 
5:00 p.m. Exhibit. Reception, Talk 

Wednesday. February 6 

9:20 a.m. Divinity School Lecture 
10:10 a.m. Committee 

7:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m. Galleries Committee 



Thursday. February 7 
4:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. Women's Center. 

Presentation 
and/or Lecture. Pot luck. Worship 



Divinity School — Slide 



CANDLEMAS IN DUKE CHAPEL 

The Catholic Liturgy of Candlemas, the Presenta- 
tion of the Lord, will be celebrated in Latin with the 
assistance of the Schola Cantorum of the University of 
North Carolina Early Music Ensemble on Saturday, 
February 2nd, at 5:00 p.m. in Duke Chapel. 

The Celebrant for this Mass will be Father Francis 
M. O'Connor, S. J., Pastor of Holy Cross Church. The 
Schola Cantorum will be directed by Mr. Dean 
Johnson of the University of North Carolina Music 
Department. ALL ARE WELCOME! 

For information call: Joseph A. Burke, S. J., 
Catholic Chaplain at Duke— 684-6246 or 684-2177. 



CIOMPI QUARTET 

The Ciompi Quartet of Duke University will offer its 
second concert of the 1979-80 season on Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 3rd, at 4:00 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. 
The program which is sponsored by the Duke Univer- 
sity Department of Music will include Haydn's Quartet 
in C, Opus 54 #2; Bartok's Quartet No. 6 (1939): and 
Mendelssohn's Quartet in A Minor, Opus 13. Admis- 
sion is free. 

The group which is well-known to area concertgoers 
includes Giorgio Ciompi. violinist and founder of the 
quartet, Claudia Erdberg, violinist, George Taylor, 
violist, and Fred Raimi, cellist. 

During the academic year of 1979-80 the Ciompi 
Quartet will be touring throughout the U. S. They'll be 
playing in Chicago, the Gardner Museum in Boston, 
Mobile, Indianapolis, Bard College in the state of New 
York, and the University of Michigan in Detroit where 
Jane Hawkins, pianist, will play Dvorak's Quintet with 
the group. The quartet will also play in Kenansville, 
Fayetteville and Campbell College within the state of 
North Carolina. Their future plans include a January 
1981 tour in Europe through Italy, Spain and Portugal. 

The program follows: 



Quartet in C. Op. 54 #2 

Vivace 

Adagio 

Menuetto: Allegretto 

Finale: Adagio; Presto: Adagio 
Quartet #6(1939) 

Mesto; Vivace 

Mesto: Marcia 

Mesto; Burletta: Moderato 

Mesto 

Interval 
Quartet in A Minor, Op. 13 

Adagio; Allegro vivace 

Adagio non lento 

Intermezzo: Allegretto con moto; 
Allegro di molto 

Presto 



Joseph Haydn 

(1732-18091 



Bela Bartok 
(1881-1945) 



Felix Mendelssohn 
(1809-1847) 



OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 
SHORT COURSES 

The Duke University Office of Continuing Educa- 
tion offers a variety of short courses to area residents. 
Registration is open to the public, without prerequi- 
site. The program is designed to help among others, 
those who: Promised themselves some time for per- 
sonal enrichment through study of literature, art, 
music, or political science; Intend to conquer anxieties 
about personal communications, public speaking, 
computers, or writing; Want a better 1980 by building 
new skills, dusting off old ones, learning a craft or 
starting to exercise. A descriptive brochure is avail- 
able upon request to the Office of Continuing Educa- 
tion, 107 Bivins, Duke University, Durham, N. C. 
27708, telephone 684-6259. Classes meet in daytime, 
evening, and weekend sessions. Early enrollment is 
encouraged, as many classes have limited enrollment. 

Course Teacher Time 

Masterpieces of 

Symphonic Literature Larry Todd Mon. evening 

Liberalism, Conservatism, 

and Socialism Thomas Spragens Mon. evening 

The Golden Age of Yiddish 

Literature Arthur Tilo Alt Sun. afternoon 

Understanding Nutrition 



Women in Modern Fiction 
Pre-Columbian Art of 

the Andes 
Leadership Seminar 
Dancercise 

Lost Art of Hand 
Bookbinding Resurrected 
English as a 

Second Language 
Speaking in Public 



Arthur Tilo Alt 
Joe and 

Theresa Graedon 

with Mary Bernheim Tues. evening 
Judith Ruderman Mon. morning 



Paul Clifford 
Dave Kiel 
Beverly McCraw 



Thurs. evening 

Thurs. evening 

Tues., Thurs. & 

Fri. mornings 



Thelma George Tues. evening 

Mary Bobbitt-Cooke Mon. evening 
Gillian Plescia Mon. evening 



Words as Tools 
Computer Anxiety 
Communication Skills 
GRE Informational Session 
Alternative Careers for 
Teachers 



Lucy Knight Thurs. evening 

Scott Herman-Giddens Wed. evening 
William Friedman Wed. evening 

Jean O'Barr Wed. night 

Sat., March 29 



Most classes begin the week of February 11th. In- 
cluded are courses in literature, nutrition, politics, 
communications, and music. 

THE ANNE FLEXNER MEMORIAL AWARD 
FOR CREATIVE WRITING 

The Anne Flexner Memorial Award is offered annu- 
ally for the best piece of creative writing submitted by 
an undergraduate student at Duke University 
First Prize $200.00 

Second Prize $100.00 

Third Prize $ 50.00 

CONDITIONS 

1. The prize is open to all undergraduates, both men 
and women. 

2. Only short stories (7500-word limit), one-act plays 
(7500-word limit), and poetry (200-line limit) are 
eligible. 

3. Only one manuscript may be submitted by any 
contestant. 

4. All manuscripts must be typed double spaced and 
must be delivered to the English Office (325 Allen 
Building) by 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 March. 
The author"s name and address must appear 
nowhere except on a separate sheet placed before 
the manuscript. 



FEBRUARY CALENDAR 



WEDNESDAY 



3 






11 00 a m Chapel. Dr 
Michael Novak. 

2:00 p.m. VARSITY 
SWIMMING Duke 
vs William 4 Mary 
Women. 

4:00 p.m. CIOMPI 
QUARTET, EDMR 

7 00 & 9 00 p.m. 
Quad Flix 
SOUNDER Page 



Horn SHUT UP. 
WE RE SINGING. 
Fred Theatre $2 50 



February 4th-91h 
Duke Dance Group 
Diane Elliott 4 Ted 
Kaimon Dance 
Residency. $3. 4 
$1.50 

8 00 p m Theologian 
in Residence 
Speaker Michael 
Novak Page 



6 



10 15 a.m. D U. Wind' 

Symphony: Kidz 

Konzert. Page. Free 
4:00 p.m. Music Dept 

Lecture. Speaker 

Gerald Marks 

Rehearsal Hall. 
7 00& 9:30 p.m 

Freewater Films 

"MYUFETOLIVE 

Bio Sci 
7 30 p.m 

WRESTLING Duke 

vs. Clemson 



7 30 p.rn DUMC 
Cultural Services 
Program 
Performing Arts 
Series The Apple 
Chill Cloggers&livi 
bluegrass 
Courtyard Dining 
Rm. Hospital 

8 15 p m BSA. 
Karamu Page. 



January 31-February 

3 BSA, Black 
Student Weekend 

7 00 9 30. 4 12 
Midnight Freewater 
Film DONA FLOR 

4 HER TWO 
HUSBANDS." Bio 
Sci 

8 00pm 
GYMNASTICS 
Duke vs. UNC 

8 15 pm Hoof n 
Horn. SHUT UP. 
WE RE SINGING 
Fred Theatre $2 50 



7:00 S 9:30 p.m 
Freewater Films 
"NOTORIOUS." 
Bio. Sci. 

7:00 p.m. FENCING 
Duke Men vs N C 
State 

8 15pm Music Dept 
Guest/Faculty 
Recital Varfan 
Manoogian, Violin & 
John Ruggero. 
Piano EDMR 

8 15 p.m. Hoot n 
Horn SHUT UP. 
WE'RE SINGING 
Fred Theatre. $2 50 



7 00 p.m. Freewater 

Films OH. DAD. 

POOR DAD. Bio. 

Sci. 
8:30 p.m D U. U. 

Broadway at Duke 
P S YOUR CAT IS 

DEAD 
9 30& midnight 



February 2-8th 

Theologians in 

Residence. 
1 00 p.m. VARSITY 

SWIMMING Duke 

vs. East Carolina 

M4W 
7 30 p m WOMEN'S 

BASKETBALL 

Duke vs 

Appalachian St. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Artists 

Series LES 

GRANDS BALLETS 

CANADIENS 

Tickets $9.. 4 $7. 



9 



9 30 am -4 45 p.m. 
Conference on 
Career Choices 
Schedules available 
at Flowers 
Information Desk 

10.30 am. Freewater 
Films MY SIDE OF 
THE MOUNTAIN." 
Children Gross 
Chem. 

2:00 p.m. INDIA FILM. 



& Ted KaliT 

Sound & Movement. 

Ark $2 50 Pub. 
8:00 p.m East 

Carolina & Duke 

Modern Black Mass 

Choirs in Concert. 

$2.00 Gen Public. 

$1.50 Students. 

Page Aud. 
8 15 p.m. 

Faculty/Guest 



lO 



IT 



11 00 a.m. Chapel: 
The Reverend 
Fleming Rutledge 

f 00 p.m. Arts in Duk< 
Chapel Organ 



24 



11 



February 10th-16th 
Triangle Dance 
Guild Washington 
Ballet Dance 
Residency. 

11 00 am Chapel 
The Reverend 
Robert T Young 

7.00 & 9:00 p.m 
Quad Flix: 

MAGIC " Page 
SI 50. 

8 15 pm Hoof n 
Horn SHUT UP. 
WERE SINGING 
Fred Theatre $2 50 



i:00p.m N. C 
SYMPHONY. Guher 
and Suher Pekinel. 
Duo Pianos. Page 
$6.00 General 
Public; $3.00 
Students 



11 00 a.m. Chapel. 
The Reverend Dr 
Richard Lischer. 

7 004915pm 
Quad Flix SAME 
TIME. NEXT YEAR 
Page $1 50 

8 15 p.m Duke 
Players RING 
AROUND THE 
MOON " Branson. 
$3 4 $4 

8 15 p.m 
Feeulty/Guest 
Recital J Hanks. 
Tenor. J Hull. 
Soprano. 4 J 
Hawkins. Piano. 
EDMR 



IS 



IS 



10:15 a.m. N. C 
SYMPHONY 
EDUCATIONAL 
MATINEE. Page. 

7 00 4 9 30 p.m. 
Freewater Films. A 
NIGHT OF SHORT 
FILMS." Bio. Sci. 

7 30 pm. Campus 
Club Meeting. 
Amphitheater. 
Hosp 

7 30 pm 
WRESTLING: Duke 
vs. Va. Common- 
wealth. 



19 



8 00 p. 

of Duke Women 

Guest Speaker 

Page Free 
8 15 pm Senior 

Recital J Lee. 

Baritone and K 

Huestis. Piano 

EDMR 



Association 7:00 4 9:30 p.m. 
Freewater Films 

SANSHIRO 
SUGATA Bio. Sci 



25 



26 



8 00 p.m. Senior 
Recital: Allen Dean 
Organ Chapel 



13 



10:00 a.m. Campus 

Club Lecture 

Series. Speaker 

Prof. Elwyn H. 

Simons EDMR 

Season $4 
10 00 am. Triangle 

Dance Guild 

presents 

WASHINGTON 

BALLET CO Page 

Children $1. Others 

$2 
7:30 p.m. DUMC 

Cultural Services 

Program 

Performing Arts 

Series The New 

Generations. 

gospel. Courtyard 

Dining Rm. 



20 



7 30 p.m DUMC 
Cultural Services 
Program 
Performing Arts 
Series: Triangle, 
contemporary folk 
music, guitar, violin, 
viola & voice. Main 
Lobby, Hospital 

7:30 p.m. 
BASKETBALL: 
Duke vs. Clemson. 



14 



10:00 a.m. Triangle 

Dance Guild 

presents 

WASHINGTON 

BALLET CO. Page 

Children $1. Others 

S2- 
7:00 p.m. Freewater 

Films: "MR. 

BLANDINGS 

BUILDS HIS 

DREAM HOUSE 

Bio Sci 
7:30 p.m. WOMEN S 

BASKETBALL 

Duke vs UNC 
9:30 p.m Freewater 



21 



7:00 p.m. FENCING 

Duke Men 4 Women 

vs. UNC 
7 00 4 9:30 p.m. 

Freewater Films: 
CHARADE.'' Bio. 

Sci. 



Recital: W. Lail. 
8antone 4 M. 
Ching. Piano. 
EDMR. 
8:15 p.m Duke 
Players "RING 
AROUND THE 
MOON." Branson 
$2.50 All 



2T 



28 



15 



Erdberg. Violin, A. 
Dawkins. Viola, and 
J. Hawkins, Piano. 
EDMR. Free. 



16 



7:00. 9:30 4 Midnight 

Freewater Films: 
BLANK 

GENERATION Sio 

Sci. 
8:00 p.m Triangle 

Dance Guild 

presents 

WASHINGTON 

BALLET CO. Page 



1 00 GYMNASTICS: 
Duke. E. Tenn St. ,4 
James Madison U. 

3 00 p.m 
BASKETBALLL: 
Duke vs Univ of 
Maryland 

7 00 4 9:15 p.m. 
Quad Flix 

DRACULA." Page. 
$1.50. 

8 15 pm 
Faculty/Guest 
Recital G Ciompi. 
Violin A Ciompi 
Clarinet, and B. 
Sharon. Piano. 
EDMR Free. 



22 



23 



7 00. 9:30 4 Midnight 10 30 am Freewater 



Sci. 

7 30pm 
WRESTLING: Duke 
vs. Univ. of Va. 

8 15 p m Faculty 
Recital: Loren 
Withers. Piano. 
Page. Free. 

8 15 pm D. U. Wind 

Symphony 

Viennese Ball 

Durham Civic 

Center 
8:15 pm. Duke 

Players: RING 



12:00 noon 

WRESTLING: 

Tn-Meet: Duke. 

Citadel. 4 Ga. Tech. 
7:0049:15pm 

Quad. Flix "SAME 

TIME. NEXT YEAR". 

Page. $1.50. 
8 15 p.m Chamber 

Arts Society: 

Juilliard Quartet. 

EDMR. $6. 
8 15 pm Duke 

Players RING 

AROUND THE 

MOON." Branson 

13 4 $4 



10:00 a.m Campus 

Club Lecture 

Series Speaker: 

Prof. Bruce R. 

Kuniholm EDMR. 
8 15 p.m Round 

Table on Science 4 

Public Affairs 

Lecture. Speaker: 

Dr Frank Press. 

Gross Chem. 
8:15 p.m. BSA Dance 

Recital Page 



BASKETBALL: ACC 
TOURNAMENT 

7:00 4 9:30 p.m. 
Freewater Films: 
"THE STRANGER 
Bio. Sci. 

8:15 p.m Duke 
Players RING 
AROUND THE 
MOON." Branson. 
$250 



29 

BASKETBALL ACC 

TOURNAMENT 
WRESTLING ACC 

TOURNAMENT 

Duke 
7:00 4 10:00 p.m. 

Freewater Films: 
tv, ". Bio. Sci 
8 15 Duke Players 
RING AROUND 

THE MOON" 

Branson S3 4 $4. 
8:15 p.m Senic 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR^ 




February 3-10, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published February 1, 1980 



Number 17 



Sunday, February 3 

February 2nd-10th D. U. U. Galleries Exhibit: Works by Karen 
Laub-Novak. West Gallery. 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:45 a.m. Carillon Concert, Duke Chapel, By Samuel Hammond. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: Theologian-in-Residence Dr. Michael Novak. 
American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research. 
Washington. D. C. Music includes Canadian Hymns & 
Prayers for both Nations. The Service of Worship is Broad- 
cast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: V2 price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

2:00 p.m. VARSITY SWIMMING: Duke vs. William & Mary. 
Women. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Tryouts for "H.M.S. PINAFORE" (The Durham 
Savoyards, Ltd.) Arts Council Bldg.. 120 Morris St. (old City 
Hall). 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00-5:00 p.m. D. U. U. Galleries: Reception for Karen Laub- 
Novak. West Gallery. 104 Flowers. 

4:00 p.m. CIOMPI QUARTET. EDMR. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center. 505 Alex- 
ander. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "SOUNDER."' Cast: Paul 
Winfield, Cicely Tyson, & Kevin Hooks. Producer: Robert 
B. Radnitz. Dir.: Martin Ritt. A simple story of a black fam- 
ily's struggle for survival during the depression in the deep 
South, Sounder is an encouraging vision of human strength 
and love. Page. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof n Horn. SHUT UP. WE'RE SINGING." Fred 
Theatre. $2.50. 

Monday, February 4 

February 4th-9th Duke Dance Group: Diane Elliott & Ted Kalmon 
Dance Residency. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Special Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Tao-Shih 
Hsieh. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

4:15 p.m. Erasmus Club Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Donald Rosen- 
berg. Rm. 226 Perkins Library. 

4:15 p.m. Department of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. H. Fre- 
derik Nijhout. Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. Gothic Bookshop invites you to meet William H. 
Chafe. Page Bldg. 

Tuesday, February 5 
9:00 a.m. -12 Noon Canadian Studies Symposium: U. S. -Canadian 
Energy, Mineral Resources, and Environmental Issues 
throughout day. Convenor: Dr. Gerald R Stairs. Coin Gal- 
lery, East Campus Art Museum. Open to Public. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

10:15 a.m. Duke University Wind Symphony— KIDZ KONZERT. 
Page Aud. Free. 

12:00 noon-2:00 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Federal Funding Workshops. 
Speaker: Lucy Knight. Rm. 105 West Duke Bldg. 



12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics & Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

Patricia G. Palmer. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. 
12:30 p.m. Genetics 350 Colloquium. Speaker: Dr. John Lucchesi. 
Rm. 147 Medical Sciences I. 

1:00 p.m. -4:30 p.m. Canadian Studies Symposium: U. S.- 
Canadian Energy. Mineral Resources, and Environmental Is- 
sues throughout day. Convenor: Dr. Gerald R. Stairs. Coin 
Gallery, East Campus Art Museum. Open to Public. 

3:00-5:00 p.m. Institute of Policy Sciences & Public Affairs Col- 
loquium. Speaker: Geoffrey Smith. Rm. 204 Perkins Lib. 

4:00 p.m. Music Dept. Lecture. Speaker: Gerald Marks. Rehearsal 
Hall. Open to the Public. Free. 

4:00 p.m. Special Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. James R. 
Ehleringer. Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. Aud. 

4:00 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Annual Meeting. Rm. 226 Perkins Li- 
brary. 

4:00 p.m. Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: John Huguenard. Rm. 
408 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

7:00, 9:00. & 11:00 BOG House: "CASINO ROYALE." Gross 
Chem. $1.00. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "MY LIFE TO LIVE." Daring 
complexity and paradoxical style mark this film consisting of 
twelve tableaux that depict the adventures of a Parisian sales- 
girl who drafts into a life of prostitution. Dir.: Jean-Luc 
Godard. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/lD Free: Others $1.50. 

7:30 p.m. WRESTLING: Duke vs. Clemson. 

8:15 p.m. Canada Week: "THE WOMEN OF MARGARET 
LAURENCE" a Dramatic Performance by Norma Edwards. 
EDMR. Reception following. 

Wednesday, February 6 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30-1:30 p.m. Dept. of Education Spring Symposium. Speaker: 
Lloyd Issacs. Rm. 202 West Duke Bldg. 

1:00 p.m. Political Science Department Colloquium Series. 
Speaker: Prof. Richard Lowenthal. Rm. 204 Perkins Library. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Anatomy Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Charles 
Goodno. Rm. 273 Sands Bldg. 

4:00-5:00 p.m. Canada Week: Gallery talk by Professor John Con- 
nolly for Canadian Art Exhibit — "Time to Draw." E. Cam- 
pus Art Museum. 

7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services Program Performing Arts 
Series: The Apple Chill Cloggers & Live Bluegrass. Court- 
yard Dining Rm. Hospital. Free. 

8:15 p.m. BSA Presents "FOR COLORED GIRLS WHO CON- 
SIDERED SUICIDE WHEN THE RAINBOW IS ENUF. " 
$2.00 Page. 

Thursday, February 7 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

9:15-10:45 a.m. Canada Week: Continuing Education Series: John 
Schultz, visiting Professor. Mount Allison University. 
Pre-Confederation History of Canada." Campus Center 
Building. East Campus. 

12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

3:30 p.m. Institute of Policy Sciences & Public Affairs Col- 
loquium. Speaker: Michael Novak. Rm. 226 Perkins Library. 

4:00 p.m. Council on Aging and Human Development Seminar. 
Speakers: Lise Wallach, Ph.D. & Michael A. Wallach, Ph.D. 
Rm. 1504 Gerontology Bldg. 



5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Memorial Chapel, Duke 
Chapel. 

6:00 p.m. Federation Banquet. Speaker: Prof. Earnestine Friedle. 
Union Ballroom, West Campus. 

7:00 p.m. FENCING: Duke vs. N. C. State. 

7:00-8:30 p.m. German Dept. Film Exhibition: Films by Ruttman, 
Eggeling, Richter Rm. 226 Perkins. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: -NOTORIOUS." Top-notch 
espionage tale set in W.W. II South America. Ingrid Bergman 
must marry Nazi spy Claude Rains to aid the U. S. and gov- 
ernment agent Cary Grant. Dir.: Alfred Hitchcock. Bio. Sci, 
Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 

8:00 p.m. Duke Philosophy Colloquium. Speaker: Annette Baier. 
Rm. 204 West Duke Bldg. East Campus. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof V Horn. "SHUT UP, WERE SINGING." Fred 
Theatre. $2.50. 

8:15 p.m. Guest & Faculty Recital. Vartan Manoogian, Violin & 
John Ruggero, Piano. EDMR. Free. Open to public. 

Friday, February 8 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:00 Noon Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaal. Rm. 

011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Microbiology/Immunology and Biochemistry 
Seminar. Speaker: George R. Stark. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. 
Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Barbara Beaman. Rm. 
144 Bio. Sci. 

3:00 p.m. Canada Week: Quebec Today. Speakers: Prof. Robert 
Armstrong & Prof. Edward A. Tiryakian. Center for Interna- 
tional Studies. 2114 Campus Dr. 

7:00 p.m. Freewater Films: "OH DAD. POOR DAD. MAMAS 
HUNG YOU IN THE CLOSET AND I'M FEELING SO 
SAD." Zany black comedy about a typical family consisting 
of a domineering mother, two piranhas. Venus flytraps, a 
baby son (aged 25), etc. Stars: Rosalind Russell, Jonathan 
Winters. & Robert Morse. Dir.: Richard Quine. Bio. Sci. 
Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 

8:30 p.m. D. U. U. Broadway at Duke: "P. S. YOUR CAT IS 
DEAD." Fred. Page. $6.50, $5.50, & $4.50 ($2.00 Discount 
Duke Undergraduates). 

9:30 p.m. & Midnight Freewater Films: "REAL LIFE." Writer- 
director-star Albert Brooks brings his special brand of mad- 
ness to the silver screen, creating an hilariously satirical ac- 
count of what happens to a typical American family when a 
group of filmmakers moves in with them to record "real life." 
Rated PG. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others 
$1.50. 

Saturday, February 9 

9:00 a.m. Canada Week: Workshop for Public School Teachers. 

Convenor: Georgia Herring. Center for International Studies. 
9:30 a.m. -4:45 p.m. Conference on Career Choices. Schedules 

available at Flowers Information Desk. 
10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:30 a.m. Freewater Films: "MY SIDE OF THE MOUNTAIN." 

(Children) Story of a young boy who wants to follow in the 

footsteps of his hero, Henry Thoreau. and leaves home to live 

on his own in the forest. Plenty of action and natural beauty. 

Gross Chem. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 
5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
8:00 p.m. Modern Black Mass Choir: "HEAR OUR VOICES— A 

GOSPEL FESTIVAL." Page $2.00 & $1.50 (Students). Open 

to Public. 
8:00 p.m. Duke Dance Group: Diane Elliott & Ted Kalmon. 

"SOUND AND MOVEMENT." Ark. Tickets at door. $1.50 

Students & Senior Citizens & $3.00 Others. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Faculty Chamber Music Recital. M. Aarons. flute; 

J. Gilmore, clarinet; C. Erdberg, violin; A. Dawkins, viola; 

and J. Hawkins, piano. EDMR. Public invited. Free. 
Sunday, February 10 
9;30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 

Preacher: The Reverend Robert T. Young, Minister to the 



University. The Service of Worship is Broadcast over 
WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
1 1:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults; Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room. West Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00-5:00 p.m. D. U. U. Galleries: Reception for Margia Kramer. 
East Gallery. E. Campus Library. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center, 505 Alex- 
ander. 

7:00 p.m. Assoc, of Duke Women is sponsoring "SIRENS, A 
WOMEN'S THEATER EXTRAVAGANZA." Rehearsal 
Hall, Mary Duke Biddle Music Bldg.. E. Campus. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "MAGIC." Weird Horror- 
suspense tale of ventriloquist dominated by his dummy. Slick 
treatment, excellent performances fail to mask frailness of 
foolish-ghoulish plot and premise. Anthony Hopkins, Ann 
Margaret, Burgess Meredith. Dir.: Richard Attenborough. 
Page. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof n' Horn. "SHUT UP, WE'RE SINGING." Fred 
Theatre. $2.50. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for S3. 50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station. 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 

Deadline for the Calendar of February 10th- 
February 17th is Monday, February 4th, before 1:00 
p.m. Please note the change in the deadline hour. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



THEOLOGIANS IN RESIDENCE 

Dr. Michael Novak, teacher, columnist, theologian 
and resident scholar at the American Enterprise Insti- 
tute, and Karen Laub Novak, teacher, writer and artist 
will be theologians in residence February 2nd-8th. 

Their schedule's follow: 






Michael Novak's 
Schedule 

Sunday. February 3. 1980 
9:30 a.m. Catholic Mass 

11:00 a.m. Preach in Chapel — "The Experience of Nothingness'' 
5:30 p.m. Lutheran & United Methodist Groups 

"Election— 1980" 
Monday. February 4, 1980 

7:30 p.m. Page Auditorium — "The War of Ideas: The Theolog> 
of Democratic Capitalism ' 
Tuesday, February 5. 1980 
1:00 p.m. Law Forum — Pilgrimage from Liberalism to Conser- 
vatism 
4:00 p.m. Chronicle Panel — Tim Foote. Time Magazine: 

Joann Omang Washington Post: and Novak 
5:30 p.m. Reception 
Wednesday, February 6, 1980 
11:30 a.m. Divinity School Chapel 

Service — Preach 
Thursday. February 7, 1980 
1:30 p.m. Duke Institute for Learning 

3:00 p.m. In Retirement "Journey from Liberalism to Conser- 
vatism" 
Friday. February 8. 1980 
6:00 p.m. Community II & BSU 

"Impact of Religion on Politics" 

Karen Laub Novak's 
Schedule 

Sunday. February 3 
3:00 p.m. Galleries Committee: 
5:00 p.m. Exhibit. Reception, Talk 

Wednesday, February 6 

9:20 a.m. Divinity School Lecture 
10:10 a.m. Committee 

7:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m. Galleries Committee 

Thursday, February 7 
4:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. Women's Center. Divinity School — Slide 
Presentation aniior Lecture, Pot luck. Worship 



TRYOUTS FOR •'H.M.S. PINAFORE" 

The Durham Savoyards, Ltd., a town and gown 
participating organization of the Durham Arts Council, 
will hold tryouts for its annual Gilbert and Sullivan 
production on Sunday afternoon, February 3rd, from 
2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., in the Arts Council Building, 
120 Morris Street (the old City Hall). The 1980 opera 
will be the perennial favorite, "H.M.S. Pinafore," di- 
rected by Paul Bryan of the Music Department at Duke 
and Ben Keaton of the Drama Department at North 
Carolina Central University: all parts are open, and all 
singers and workers are invited to come to tryouts. 
"Pinafore" will play in Page Auditorium on April 
18th- 19th and in Stewart Theater in Raleigh on April 
25th-26th. Sign on for the cruise! 

DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION 

GALLERIES EXHIBIT 

WORKS BY KAREN LAUB-NOVAK 

The Duke University Union Galleries presents 
drawings and prints by Washington, D. C. artist, lec- 
turer, and writer Karen Laub-Novak which will be on 



exhibit February 2nd-February 10th in West Gallery. 
A reception for the artist will be held in the West Gal- 
lery, 104 Flowers, on Sunday February 3rd, from 3:00 
p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

CIOMPI QUARTET 

The Ciompi Quartet of Duke University will offer its 
second concert of the 1979-80 season on Sunday. Feb- 
ruary 3rd, at 4:00 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. 
The program which is sponsored by the Duke Univer- 
sity Department of Music will include Haydn's Quartet 
in C, Opus 54 #2; Bartok's Quartet No. 6 (1939): and 
Mendelssohn's Quartet in A Minor, Opus 13. Admis- 
sion is free. 

"SHUT UP, WE'RE SINGING!" 
"'Shut Up, We're Singing!", a potpourri comic 
musical revue written and produced by Duke students 
will present their remaining three performances Sun- 
day, February 3rd, Thursday, February 7th. and Sun- 
day, February 10th, in Fred Theatre on Duke's West 
Campus at 8:15 p.m. 

Members of Duke's Hoof n' Horn musical theater 
group have been writing and perfecting this production 
since September. Rick Lukianuk and Scott Smoot, 
both veterans of original revues, wrote the music and 
lyrics for the cast of eight. Lukianuk authored 
"Another Saturday Night," performed at Duke in 
1977. 

Tickets will be on sale at Page Box Office for $2.50. 
Free refreshments will be served at the performances. 

CANADA WEEK 

This year, once again, Duke University's Canadian 
Studies Center continues its tradition in presenting a 
multi-dimensional approach to our Northern neighbor 
during CANADA WEEK. Participants of the program 
are invited to sample the cultural diversity of the 
world's second largest country through a week of 
Canadian music, art, drama, and symposia. The 
schedule of events begins with a performance by the 
Duke Artist Series, "Les Grands Ballets Canadiens" 
at Page Auditorium on Saturday, February 2nd. Other 
highlights of the week include a carillon concert, a 
seminar on "U. S. -Canadian Energy. Mineral Re- 
sources, and Environmental Issues," a dramatic per- 
formance of "The Women of Margaret Laurence," a 
gallery talk on a Canadian art exhibit, and a lecture on 
the "Pre-Confederation History of Canada." The pro- 
gram concludes with a panel discussion on "Quebec 
Today" on Friday, February 8th at the Center for Is- 
lamic and Arabian Studies, 2114 Campus Drive. 

The schedule of events open to the public follows: 

MONDAY JANUARY 28-FRIDAY FEBRUARY 29 
Canadian Art Exhibit — ""Time to Draw" 
East Campus Art Museum 
FRIDAY, FEB. 1 Canadian Faculty and Student Reception 

4:00 p.m. honoring the Consul-General. Ralph 

Stewart. Atlanta Consulate, at the Center 
for International Studies. 2101 Campus 
Drive. 



SATURDAY. FEB. 
8:15 p.m. 

SUNDAY, FEB. 3 
10:45 a.m. 



11:00 a.m. 

TUESDAY. FEB. 5 
9:00 a.m.-12 Noon 
1:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. 



Duke Artists Series: "Les Grands Ballets 
Canadiens." Page Auditorium. (Sold Out) 
Carillon Concert. Duke Chapel by Samuel 
Hammond. 

Duke Chapel Service. (Canadian Hymns 
and Prayers for both Nations used at ser- 
vice.) 

Symposium on U. S. -Canadian Energy, 
Mineral Resources, and Environmental Is- 
sues throughout day. Dr. Gerald R. Stairs. 
Convenor, Coin Gallery, East Campus Art 
Museum. 



"The Women of Margaret Laurence" a 
8:15 p.m. Dramatic Performance by Norma Ed- 

wards. EDMR. Reception following. 
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 6 Gallery talk by Professor John Connolly 
4:00-5:00 p.m. for Canadian Art Exhibit — "Time to 

Draw." East Campus Art Museum. 
THURSDAY. FEB. 7 Continuing Education Series: John 
9: 15-10:45 a.m. Schultz, visiting Professor, Mount Allison 

University, "Pre-Confederation History of 
Canada," Campus Center Building, East 
Campus. 
FRIDAY. FEB. 8 Quebec Today: Visiting Professor Robert 

3:00 p.m. Armstrong, University of Quebec, 

"Political-Economic Development," and 
Professor Edward A. Tiryakian, "Social- 
Cultural Development" at Center for Inter- 
national Studies, 2114 Campus Drive. 
SATURDAY, FEB. 9 Workshop for Public School Teachers: 
9:00 a.m. Georgia Herring. Duke Outreach Assistant 

for North Carolina Public Schools, Con- 
venor, Center for International Studies. 

SPECIAL BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 
Tao-Shih Hsieh, Department of Biochemistry, Stan- 
ford University, Palo Alto, California, will speak on 
"Drosophila Atp-Dependent DNA Tropoisomerase" 
for the Special Biochemistry Seminar on Monday, Feb- 
ruary 4th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke 
Building. Coffee will be served at 12:15 p.m. in the 
lobby. 

ERASMUS CLUB LECTURE 
PROFESSOR DONALD ROSENBERG 
The Erasmus Club will present a lecture by Professor 
Donald Rosenberg, of the Department of German, at its 
meeting on Monday, February 4th at 4:15 p.m. in 226 
Perkins Library (the Assembly Room). The lecture is 
entitled "Three Eyewitnesses: the Robber Knight, the 
Humanist, and the Anonymous Painter at the Battle 
before Nuremburg, 1502." The Department of English 
will host the reception on this occasion, and everyone is 
cordially invited to attend. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 
Dr. H. Frederik Nijhout, Department of Zoology, 
Duke University, will speak on "Making Modish 
Moths: Development of Wing Patterns in Lepidoptera" 
for the Department of Zoology Seminar on Monday, 
February 4th, at 4: 15 p.m. in Room 1 1 1 of the Biological 
Sciences Building. Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 
p.m. 

MEET THE AUTHOR 
WILLIAM H. CHAFE 
You are invited to meet William H. Chafe at the 
Gothic Bookshop, on February 4th from 5:00 to 6:00 



p.m. We will be celebrating his new book. Civilities and 
Civil Rights, Greensboro, North Carolina, and the 
Black Struggle for Freedom, published by Oxford Uni- 
versity Press. 

William H. Chafe is Professor of History at Duke 
University and Co-Director of the Duke Oral History 
Program and Center for the Study of Civil Rights. 

The Gothic Bookshop is located on Duke Univer- 
sity's West Campus, next to Page Auditorium, near the 
Chapel. Everyone is welcome. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY WIND SYMPHONY 
KIDZ KONZERT 

Page Auditorium will be the new location of this 
year's Duke University Wind Symphony's KIDZ 
KONZERT. The concert, which is sponsored by the 
Department of Music, is geared to the interests of young 
school children and will begin at 10: 15 a.m. on Tuesday, 
February 5th. There'll be audience singing, a tall sur- 
prise from the sports field, and a performance on one of 
the longest horns in the world — plus some other tuneful 
music. Bring your young children and join us. The pub- 
lic is invited. Admission is free. For information con- 
cerning reservation of seats contact Susan Wilson at 
684-2534. 

KAPPA DELTA PI 
FEDERAL FUNDING WORKSHOPS 

Lucy Knight, Federal Relations Coordinator at Duke, 
will present two "how to" workshops on federal fund- 
ing on February 5th and February 13th. "Federal 
Funding Workshop I" will be on February 5th, at 12:00 
noon through 2:00 p.m. in West Duke Building, Room 
105. Ms. Knight, who holds an M.A.T. degree in social 
studies from Weslyan University, edited Education 
Funding News, a national weekly newsletter on federal 
funding in education. Her responsibilities as Federal 
Relations Coordinator include presenting the funding 
workshop to groups of Duke faculty members. 

Federal Funding Workshops I and II will cover 
elementary/secondary education and higher education, 
respectively. In each presentation Ms. Knight will 
compare the roles of the Office of Education, the Na- 
tional Institute for Education, and the National En- 
dowments for the Arts and Humanities in the funding of 
education projects. She will discuss the timing of pro- 
posals, funding of programs and research resources to 
help you obtain funds for your project. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS 
AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

A seminar in plant systematics and evolution will be 
held on Tuesday, February 5th, at 12:30 p.m., in Room 
130 Biological Sciences. Dr. Patricia G. Palmer will 
speak on "An SEM analysis of African grass leaves and 
its paleoecological applications." Dr. Palmer received 
the doctoral degree from North Carolina State Univer- 
sity, and is currently at Duke on leave from Louisburg 
College, holding an NSF Faculty Fellowship. Her re- 
search centers on African fossil grasses and their impli- 
cations for past ecological environments. 



GENETICS COLLOQUIUM 

Dr. John Lucchesi, Department of Zoology, Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. Chapel Hill, will speak on 
""Dosage Compensation and Evolution of Sex Chromo- 
somes" for the Genetics 350 Colloquium on Tuesday, 
February 5th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Medical Sci- 
ences I. Dr. Lucchesi's lectures are the first of three 
groups of four lectures in Genetics 350 this Spring. 

INSTITUTE OF POLICY SCIENCES 
AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS COLLOQUIUM 

Geoffrey Smith. Chief Editorial Writer and Political 
Columnist, The Times. London, will discuss "The 
U. S. Presidential Election as viewed from a British 
Perspective" as part of the Duke Colloquia on Com- 
parative Policymaking, sponsored by the Institute of 
Policy Sciences and Public Affairs. The colloquium will 
meet in Room 204 Perkins Library on Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary 5th, from 3:00-5:00 p.m. and will be moderated by 
Professor Joel L. Fleishman. 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT LECTURE 

On Tuesday, February 5th, Gerald Marks of ASCAP 
(American Society of Composers, Authors and Pub- 
lishers) will begin a three day residency which runs 
through Thursday, February 7th, with the Duke Uni- 
versity Department of Music. 

Mr. Marks will give a lecture on Tuesday, February 
5th, at 4:00 p.m. in the Rehearsal Hall of the Mary Duke 
Biddle Music Building — East Campus. His talk is de- 
signed to inform students and faculty and the interested 
public about the practical aspects of the music profes- 
sion (the backstage of the songwriting and serious com- 
position fields) and covers the following subjects: Per- 
forming Rights (responsible today for the largest part of 
the composer's income): a History of the Performing 
Rights movement in this country, its purpose, philoso- 
phy and significance in the lives of all of us, and how it 
functions; the wheels that are put in motion to guaran- 
tee compensation to composer, librettist, lyricist, of an 
opera, symphony, piece of chamber music, a song, or 
the music at the circus; what a writer is entitled to re- 
ceive; a review of Copyright as it pertains to the music 
profession; how some songs develop — inspiration, 
know-how, genius or a combination of the foregoing 
plus fortuitous circumstances. 

This lecture is open to the public. Admission is free. 
Special appointments by individuals wanting to talk 
with Gerald Marks can be made through Mrs. Susan 
Wilson at 684-2534. 

SPECIAL PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. James R. Ehleringer, Department of Biology, 
University of Utah, State Lake City. Utah, will speak 
on "Optimality and adaptation in desert plants: Tales of 
a desert wanderer" for the Special Plant Ecology Semi- 
nar on Tuesday, February 5th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 1 1 1 
Biological Sciences Auditorium. An informal wine and 
cheese reception will be held in the Botany 
Greenhouses following the Seminar. 



PHI BETA KAPPA ANNUAL MEETING 

PHI BETA KAPPA. Beta of North Carolina, will 
hold its Annual Meeting in 226 Perkins Library at 4:00 
p.m., Tuesday, February 5th. The agenda will include 
the election of new members. Members are urged to 
attend. Newcomers to the Duke community who are 
members of Phi Beta Kappa and wish to affiliate with 
the Duke chapter may do so by sending their name, 
place and year of election, and local address to the Sec- 
retary, Box 4795 Duke Station, Durham 27706, or by 
campus mail to 401 Perkins Library. 

PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

John Huguenard will speak on "The Involvement of 
Autoimmunity in Myasternia Gravis" for the Phar- 
macology Seminar on Tuesday, February 5th, at 4:00 
p.m. in Room 408 Nanaline H. Duke Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
SPRING SYMPOSIUM 

Lloyd Isaacs, Executive Director of NCEA, will 
speak on "Teacher Political Power at the Local Level" 
for the Department of Education Spring Symposium on 
Wednesday, February 6th, at 12:30 p.m. -1:30 p.m. in 
Room 202 West Duke Building. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 
COLLOQUIUM SERIES 

Professor Richard Lowenthal, Berlin University and 
the National Humanities Center, will speak on "End of 
Detente?" for the Political Science Department Col- 
loquium Series on Wednesday, February 6th, from 1:00 
till 2:30 p.m. in Room 204 Perkins Library. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY SEMINAR 

Dr. Charles Goodno, Department of Food Service, 
North Carolina State University, will speak on "The 
Use of Vanidate ion as Probe of the Mechanism of the 
Myosin ATPase" on Wednesday, February 6th, at 4:00 
p.m. in Room 273 Sands Building. Coffee and cookies 
will be served at 3:45 p.m. 

KARAMU PRESENTS 
"FOR COLORED GIRLS . . ." 

Karamu (a black student drama group) will present 
"For Colored Girls Who Considered Suicide When The 
Rainbow Is Enuf" by Ntozake Shange on Wednesday, 
February 6th, at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Miss 
Shange's Choreopoem was featured on Broadway as a 
celebration of being black and being a woman. "For 
Colored Girls . . ." is a celebration for black women but 
there is a subtle and far reaching message for everyone. 
Tickets, price $2.00, are available at the door and Page 
Box Office. 

The cast includes: Victoria Bernardo, Sterlia Benson, 
Paula Young. Anna Blackburne. Kim Smith, Camilla 
Lawson, Ava Lias, and Dawn Frisbee. Directors are: 
Paula Gomes and Vergil Smith. 



COUNCIL ON AGING 
AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR 

Lise Wallach, Ph.D., Lecturer and Michael A. 
Wallach, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Psychol- 
ogy, will speak on 'Effective Reading Instruction for 
Disadvantaged Children" for the Council on Aging and 
Human Development Seminar on Thursday, February 
7th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 1504 Gerontology Building. 
The seminar is open to the public. 

FEDERATION BANQUET 

On Thursday, February 7th, at 6:00 p.m. the Feder- 
ation Banquet will be held in the Union Ballroom on 
West Campus. Professor Earnestine Friedle, Dean of 
Arts & Sciences, Dean of Trinity College, will be the 
speaker. 

GERMAN DEPARTMENT FILM EXHIBITION 

The Department of German will present two show- 
ings of short films by the artists featured in the exhibi- 
tion "Film as Film" (in Perkins Library through Feb- 
ruary). 

I. Thursday, February 7, 7-8:30 p.m.. Room 226 
Perkins: Films by Ruttmann, Eggeling, Richter. 

II. Thursday. February 14, 7-8:30 p.m.. Room 226 
Perkins: Films by Graeff, Fischinger. Leger. Man Ray. 
Duchamp. 

Both programs will be introduced by Professor Inez 
Hedges. 

DUKE PHILOSOPHY COLLOQUIUM 
Annette Baier, Professor of Philosophy at the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, will read a paper entitled 
"Humes's Account of Truth" for the Duke Philosophy 
Colloquium on Thursday. February 7th, at 8:00 p.m. in 
Room 204 West Duke Building, East Campus. 

GUEST AND FACULTY RECITAL 

Strains of Bartok, Debussy and Ravel as well as 
those of composer, Robert Ward who is currently 
Professor of Composition in the Department of Music, 
will be heard beginning at 8:15 p.m. on the evening of 
Thursday, February 7th, when Vartan Manoogian, 
violinist, and John Ruggero, pianist, join in recital in 
the East Duke Music Room. 

As soloist, ensemble musician and concertmaster, 
Manoogian has performed on five continents during 
the 60's and 70's. His honors include an Emmy Award 
for his 1976 television performance of the Mozart Vio- 
lin Concerto in A Major with the Savannah Symphony 
Orchestra under the direction of George Troutwein: 
the Certificate of Honor from the Pablo Casals Festival 
in Puerto Rico: and first prize for ensemble coaching in 
the 1973 Coleman Chamber Music Competition in 
Pasadena, California. 

Vartan Manoogian, born in Bagdad of Armenian 
parents, graduated from the Paris Conservatory with 
First Prize and distinctions, and studied in the United 
States at the Juilliard School, where he was the pupil 
of Ivan Galamian. 

Since 1970, Manoogian has been a senior faculty 



member at the North Carolina School of the Arts, 
coordinator of the string department and concertmas- 
ter of the Piedmont Chamber Orchestra. He is the 
founder-director of American Music Video Tape Proj- 
ect, which aims to create and preserve a permanent 
record of distinguished works of music together with 
the composers* own commentaries and participation to 
assure posterity of definitive performances of their 
own works. 

John Ruggero, pianist and composer, began the 
study of music at age 4 with his father, a professional 
musician. After moving to Raleigh, North Carolina, he 
won the first N. C. Professional Composer's Contest 
in 1958 at the age of 13 and then several other state 
composition awards. He studied piano with Loren 
Withers and composition and orchestration with Iain 
Hamilton at Duke University where he received his 
B.A. in 1967 (Phi Beta Kappa). During his senior year 
at Duke, he won the N. C. Music Teachers Collegiate 
Competition in piano, the Henry Schuman Music Prize 
at Duke, and was the only student ever to play with the 
Duke Symphony in a regular concert (Liszt concerto 
no. 1). 

He studied with Irwin Freundlich at the Juilliard 
School where he received his M.S. in 1969 under a 
special scholarship from Mary Semans. Since 1976, he 
has been the associate president and keyboard player 
for the North Carolina Chamber Players, a group of 
outstanding musicians from the N. C. Symphony who 
present a concert series in the Triangle area. 

John Ruggero is widely known in the area as a recit- 
alist, soloist with orchestra, and chamber musician. 
Along with the N. C. Chamber Players, he has played 
with the Ciompi Quartet, the Clarion Quintet of the N. 
C. School of the Arts, the Duke Symphony, Regina 
Mushabac, winner of the N. C. Symphony Young Ar- 
tist Competition. Edwin Grzneskowski, artist-in- 
residence at the N. C. School of the Arts. In addition 
he has acted as accompanist for the National Opera 
Company summer festivals at Duke, and the Chamber 
Music Series for the 1979 Artsfare festival at Duke. 

The program follows: 
Sonata (1917) Claude Debussy 

(1862-1918) 
Firbt Sonata ( 1 950) Robert Ward 

(1917- ) 
Sonata for Violin Solo ( 1944) Bela Bartok 

(1881-1945) 
Tzigane. Rhapsodie de Concert ( 1924) Maurice Ravel 

(1875-1937) 

DEPARTMENTS OF 

MICROBIOLOGY/IMMUNOLOGY 

AND BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

George R. Stark, Department of Biochemistry, 

Stanford University Medical School, Palo Alto, 

California, will speak on •Amplification and Structure 

of the Gene for Cad. a Multifunctional Protein for 

Pyrimidine Biosynthesis" for the Departments of 

Microbiology/Immunology and Biochemistry Seminar 

on Friday, February 8th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 

Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee will be served at 

12: 15 p.m. in the Lobby. 






PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Barbara Beaman, Graduate Student, Department of 
Botany, will speak on 'Factors Affecting the Estab- 
lishment, Growth, and Survival of White Oak" for the 
Plant Ecology Seminar on Friday, February 8th, at 
12:30 p.m. in Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 

"P. S. YOUR CAT IS DEAD" 

Duke University Union Broadway at Duke presents 
"P. S. Your Cat Is Dead," on Friday, February 8th, at 
8:30 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Tickets are $6.50, 55. 50. 
and $4.50 with a $2.00 discount for Duke Under- 
graduates. This Off-Broadway play displays pathetic 
revelations of two lovers coming to grips with them- 
selves as they evolve a peculiar friendship under un- 
likely circumstances. 

CONFERENCE ON CAREER CHOICES 

Student groups, in cooperation with the Office of 
Alumni Affairs, have organized this weekend event. 
Over 70 alumni from all over the country are returning 
to participate in panel discussions on various career 
issues. The program is divided into separate sessions 
continuing throughout the day, Saturday, February 
9th. The two morning sessions are 9:30-10:50 a.m. and 
again at 11:10-12:30. Lunch is to be held in the Blue 
and White Room from 12:45-2:15 p.m. and all are in- 
vited. Afternoon sessions will be held 2:30-3:30 p.m. 
and then repeat 3:45-4:45 p.m. Locations of each dis- 
cussion group will be available at Flowers Information 
Desk. 

HEAR OUR VOICES— A GOSPEL FESTIVAL 

The Modern Black Mass Choir of Duke University 
will be in concert with the gospel choir of East 
Carolina University on Saturday, February 9th, at 8:00 
p.m. in Page Auditorium. The gospel celebration is 
open to the public and tickets priced at $2.00 and $1.50 
(Students) are available at Page Box Office and the 
door. 

The Duke University Modern Black Mass Choir was 
formed in 1972 and performs various types of music 
including, gospel, spiritual, and secular. The 52 
member choir include undergraduates and graduates of 
Duke. They have appeared at churches in Durham and 
Roxboro, have been in concert at Butner Correctional 
Institute and in Washington, D. C. The Choir is di- 
rected by Mr. Al Lipscomb and Ms. Camilla Lawson; 
the pianist is Mr. Warren Lankford. The guest choir 
from East Carolina University has 40 members. The 
aim of both Choirs is to promote togetherness through 
soul-stirring, beautiful gospel music. 

DUKE DANCE PROGRAM PRESENTS 

DIANE ELLIOT AND TED KALMON 

IN RESIDENCY AND PERFORMANCES 

The Duke Dance Program announce the return of 
Diane Elliot and Ted Kalmon to the Duke Campus 
from February 4th through February 9th for a resi- 
dency of music and dance classes as well as a perfor- 



mance "Sound and Movement" on Saturday, Feb- 
ruary 9th at 8:00 p.m. in the Ark. Tickets, available at 
the door, are $1 .50 for students and senior citizens and 
$3.00 for others. 

Classes, open to all, will meet on Monday and 
Wednesday, 4:30 p.m. -7:00 p.m. and on Tuesday and 
Thursday, 1:45 p.m. -3:00 p.m. and 4:30-7:00 p.m. in 
the Ark. 

Ms. Elliot and Mr. Kalmon have been working to- 
gether for some time. Mr. Kalmon has composed sev- 
eral scores for Ms. Elliot's choreography. Ms. Elliot 
has contributed much to the dance energy in our area 
and will continue to do so by choreographing a new 
work commissioned by UNC-Chapel Hill in the three 
weeks following her residency here. She will be setting 
on some of the areas professional dancers, among 
them Carol Richard, Marion Turner, and Donald 
Blumenfeld. 

Ms. Elliot has guest taught across the U. S. and in 
Europe where she recently completed a three-week 
residency at the Centre National de Danse Contem- 
poraine in Angers, France. Her performance credits 
include the Phyllis Lamhut Dance Company (for four 
years). Nikolais Dance Theater and a national tour of 
solos and duets with Robert Small, formerly of the 
Murray Louis Dance Company. Her choreography has 
been shown throughout New York City and in Califor- 
nia, North Carolina, and New Jersey. She has created 
commissioned works for Caravan Dance Collective of 
St. Paul, Minnesota, the Yard in Chilmark, Mas- 
sachusetts and the Fort Wayne (Indiana) Dance Col- 
lective. Critics have described her work as "witty," 
"ingenious," and "romping good fun." 

Mr. Kalmon received his Masters in Music from 
Queens College and has studied, also, with Morton 
Subotnik. He was, for three years, music director for 
the Dance Department of the University of Illinois and 
music director for the companies of Bella Lewitsky, 
Beverly Blossom, and Beverly Brown. Most recently 
he has joined the dance faculty of Sarah Lawrence 
College, free-lanced as a musician for dance through- 
out New York City and composed scores for a variety 
of choreographers, among them Murray Louis, Be- 
verly Brown, Grethe Holby, and Sharon Kinney. 

A DUKE FACULTY 
CHAMBER MUSIC RECITAL 

An evening of chamber music will begin at 8: 15 p.m. 
on Saturday, February 9th. when Martha Aarons, 
flutist; Jimmy Gilmore, clarinetist; Jane Hawkins, 
pianist; Claudia Erdberg, violinist; and Ally son Daw- 
kins, violist, join together to present works by Bee- 
thoven. Brahms, Mozart and Prokofiev. 

Martha Aarons is an associate faculty member of the 
Music Department at Duke. She has been principal 
flute with the North Carolina Symphony since 1975. A 
native of Los Angeles, California, she studied at the 
Cleveland Institute of Music and Juilliard. Ms. Aarons 
has served on the faculty of the Eastern Music Festival 
for the last two summers. She has performed solos 
with the North Carolina Symphony and also with the 
Cleveland Orchestra as winner of concerto competi- 



tionin 1973. 

Jimmy Gilmore is also an associate faculty member 
of the Duke Music Department. He is principal 
clarinetist with the North Carolina Symphony. Born in 
Dallas, Texas, Mr. Gilmore received degrees from 
Eastman School of Music and Juilliard. He has been a 
faculty member of the Eastern Music Festival for eight 
summers and made solo appearances with the 
Rochester Philharmonic and the North Carolina Sym- 
phony. 

Jane Hawkins was born in South Wales. She 
graduated with distinction from the Royal Academy of 
Music in London, where she performed often as solo- 
ist and in chamber music recitals. Ms. Hawkins has 
been on the piano staff at the State University of New 
York at Binghamton and has played numerous recitals. 
She is the 1979 recipient of the Kathleen and Joseph 
M. Bryan Young Artists Competition Award (the 
North Carolina entrant in piano). She is pianist for the 
North Carolina Symphony Orchestra and performs 
during the summers at the Manadnock Music Festival 
in New Hampshire. 

Claudia Erdberg has been a member of the Ciompi 
Quartet of Duke University since 1973. She is a 
graduate of the Juilliard School of Music, where she 
held a Naumberg Scholarship and studied violin with 
Joseph Fuchs. Her master"s degree was earned at the 
Manhattan School of Music, where her teacher was 
Raphael Bronstein. She has performed in Europe in 
the Spoleto and Salerno Festivals, and has been a 
member of the Ostschweizer Kammerorchester and 
the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra. During the 
summers, she currently is a member of the faculty of 
the Downeast Chamber Music Center in Castine. 
Maine. 

Allyson Dawkins, violist, is a new member of the 
North Carolina Symphony. She received her Masters 



degree from the Eastman School of Music. During the 
summers she has been a faculty member with the 
Aspen and Eastern Music Festivals. 

The program which is sponsored by the Duke Uni- 
versity Department of Music is open to the public 
without charge. 

The program follows: 
Serenade in D Major, Opus 25 Beethoven 

forflute, violin and viola (1770-1827) 



Sonata #1 in F minor. Opus 120. No. 1 

for clarinet and piano 
Sonata in D Major, Opus 94 

Trio in E Flat, K. 498 ("Kegelstatt Trio") 
for piano, clarinet, and viola 



Brahms 

(1833-1897) 

Prokofiev 

(1891-1953) 

Mozart 

(1756-1791) 



DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION GALLERIES 
EXHIBIT WORKS BY MARGIA KRAMER 

The Duke University Union Galleries presents New 
York artist Margia Kramer exhibiting her art work 
from the 70's in the East Gallery, East Campus Li- 
brary January 26th-February 29th. Ms. Kramer is a 
visiting Assistant Professor of painting and drawing at 
Duke this semester. There will be a reception for the 
artist Sunday, February 10th, from 3:00-5:00 p.m. in 
the gallery. The public is cordially invited. 

THE ASSOCIATION OF DUKE WOMEN 

PRESENTS, 'SIRENS, A WOMEN'S THEATER 

EXTRAVAGANZA" 

The Association of Duke Women is sponsoring a 
special presentation of Sirens: A Women's Theater 
Extravaganza performed by the Women's Collage 
Theatre live from New York City on Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 10th. Performance time is set for 7:00 p.m. at the 
Rehearsal Hall of the Mary Duke Biddle Music Build- 
ing on East Campus. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

calendar: 




February 10-17, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published February 8, 1980 



Number 18 



Sunday, February 10 

January 26th-February 29th. D. U. U. Galleries Exhibit: Works by 

Margia Kramer. East Gallery, East Campus Library. 
January 28th-February 29th Canadian Art Exhibit: "TIME TO 

DRAW" East Campus Art Museum. 
February 10th Last Day! D. U. U. Galleries Exhibit: Works by 
Karen Laub-Novak. West Gallery. 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Robert T. Young. Minister to the 
University. The Service of Worship is Broadcast over 
WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room. East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00-5:00 p.m. D. U. U. Galleries: Reception for Margia Kramer. 
East Gallery, E. Campus Library. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center, 505 Alex- 
ander. 

7:00 p.m. Assoc, of Duke Women is sponsoring "SIRENS. A 
WOMEN'S THEATER EXTRAVAGANZA." Rehearsal 
Hall Mary Duke Biddle Music Bldg., E Campus. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "MAGIC." Weird Horror- 
suspense tale of ventriloquist dominated by his dummy. Slick 
treatment, excellent performances fail to mask frailness of 
foolish-ghoulish plot and premise. Anthony Hopkins, Ann 
Margaret, Burgess Meredith. Dir: Richard Attenborough. 
Page. SI. 50. 

8:15 p.m. Hoof n' Horn. "SHUT UP, WERE SINGING." Fred 
Theatre. S2.50. 

Monday, February 11 

February 1 lth-February 15th. Triangle Dance Guild at Duke hosts 

the Washington Ballet as artists in residence. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. D. A. 

Livingstone. Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. 
6:30. 8:30. 10:30 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. United Jewish Appeal Film: 

"MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR." Bio. Sci. $1.50. 
8:00 p.m. N. C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA with Giiher & Siiher 

Pekinel, Duo-Pianists. Page Aud. $6 Gen. Public; $3 Stu.. 

65±. 

Tuesday, February 12 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:15 a.m. N. C. Symphony Educational Matinee (All arrangements 

by Durham Chapter). Page. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. The Univ. Program in Genetics Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

Bruce Nicklas. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics & Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

Ronald D. Perkins. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. 
4:00 p.m. Dept. of Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Saul 

Schanberg. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Eucharist. Duke Chapel Crypt. 



7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "A NIGHT OF SHORT 
FILMS". An exciting look at the creative talents of 
America's young aspiring filmmakers. FOCUS '79 A package 
of the seven 1977 and 1978 FOCUS (Films of College & Uni- 
versity Students) Competition winning films. Bio. Sci. Duke 
Undergrads w ID Free: Others SI. 50. 

7:30 p.m. WRESTLING: Duke vs. Va. Commonwealth. 

7:30 p.m. Campus Club Meeting. Speaker: Dr. Sanders Williams. 
Amphitheater, Hosp. 

Wednesday, February 13 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:00 a.m. Campus Club Lecture Series. Speaker: Professor Elwyn 

Simons. EDMR. S4. Public is invited. 
10:00 a.m. Triangle Dance Guild hosts the Washington Ballet Chil- 
dren's Performances: "AND SO TO DANCE." Page Aud. 
$1. Children, Others $2. 
12:00 p.m. Cancer Center Seminar. Speaker: Dr. William L. 

Richards. Rauch Conf. Rm. — 1st Fl. Morris Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
4:00 p.m. Romance Languages Seminar. Speaker: Prof. Susan 

Suleiman. Breedlove Rm.. Perkins Library. 
4:00 p.m. Faculty Discussion Session. Divinity School Commons 

Rm. 
5:00 p.m. Faculty Sherry Hour. Rare Book Room Perkins Library. 
7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services Program Performing Arts 
Series: The New Generations. Gospel. Courtyard Dining Rm. 
Hospital. Free. 
8:00-10:00 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Federal Funding Workshop. 
Speaker: Lucy Knight. Rm. 105 West Duke Bldg. 

Thursday, February 14 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:00 a.m. Triangle Dance Guild hosts the Washington Ballet Chil- 
drens' Performance: "AND SO TO DANCE." Page Aud. $1. 
Children, Others $2. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

1:30 p.m. Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement. Speaker: 
Jerry Bruno. Campus Center. East Campus. 

3:45 p.m. Meeting of Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts & 
Sciences. Rm. 139 Social Sciences. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Physiology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Myron L. 
Wolbarsht. Rm. 385 MSIA. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Memorial Chapel, Duke 
Chapel. 

7:00 p.m. Freewater Films: "MR. BLANDINGS BUILDS HIS 
DREAM HOUSE." Delightful domestic comedy — no one 
could wish for a better husband, wife , and friend of the family 
than Cary Grant, Myrna Loy, and Melvyn Douglas as they 
doggedly build a house in Connecticut. Dir.: H. C. Potter. 
Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free: Others $1.50. 

7:00-8:30 p.m. German Dept. Film Exhibition: Films by Graeff, 
Fischinger, Leger. Man Ray, Duchamp. Rm. 226 Perkins. 

7:00, 9:30 p.m. & Midnight Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity: 
"ROLLER BALL." Gross Chem. $1.50. 

7:30 p.m. WOMEN'S BASKETBALL: Duke vs. UNC. 

9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "MONKEY BUSINESS." Cary 
Grant discovers a rejuvenation serum which affects him, his 
wife Ginger Rogers, boss Charles Cobum, and secretary 
Marilyn Monroe in this wacky comedy. Coburn's classic line 
to MM: "Get someone to type this." Bio. Sci. Duke Under- 
grads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 



Friday, February 15 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

12:00 p.m. Noon Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). 
Rm. 011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 

12:00 p.m. Cancer Center Seminar. Dr. Angie Rizzino. Rauch Conf. 
Rm._lst Fl. Morris Bldg. 

12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Biochemistry Seminar: Speaker: J. J. Blum. Rm. 147 
Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Elizabeth Flint Patter- 
son. Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
3:30 p.m. Chemistry Dept. Seminar. Speaker: Dr. D. M. Pond. 

Gross Chem. Lab. Rm. 103. 
7:00. 9:30 p.m. & Midnight Freewater Films: A PUNK EX- 
TRAVAGANZA: 'BLANK GENERATION"" Dir: Amos 
Poe. Music history in the making! From Richard Hell and the 
Heartbreakers to Blondie, Patti Smith. Talking Heads. 
Ramones — a filmed franzine of today"s most popular punk 
New Wave stars made by New York's leading underground 
filmmaker. Plus: "MONGOLOID"' Dir.: Bruce Conner. 
Conner's view of our "perfect people"' society in which ev- 
erything is programmed and packaged. Music by DEVO. 
Plus: "INVOCATION OF MY SEMON BROTHER"" Dir.: 
Kenneth Anger. A conjuration of pagan forces, with sound by 
Mick Jagger (Moog Synthesizer). Plus: "HOWDY 
DOODY'S FUNLAND'" What could be more punk than 
Howdy Doody riding the chutes and looping the loops, while 
Clarabelle the clown fools around with the Supertalkoscope? 
Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 
8:00 p.m. Triangle Dance Guild hosts the Washington Ballet. Page 
Aud. Stud./65 $4., Gen. $5. 

Saturday, February 16 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

1:00 GYMNASTICS: Duke, E. Tenn. St.. & James Madison U. 

3:00 p.m. BASKETBALL: Duke vs. Univ. of Maryland. TV. 

5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "DRACULA." Cast: 
Laurence Olivier, Kate Nellington. Dir.: John Badham. (R.) 
Frank Langella's Broadway portrayal of the count as more 
turnon than menace is effectively magnified on screen. 
Otherwise the film jacks style and cleverness, and is drowned 
in pretentiousness, noise, gore, and excessive action. Page. 
$1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Faculty/Guest Recital. G. Ciompi, violin: A. Ciompi. 
Clarinet: & Boaz Sharon, piano. EDMR. Free. Open to pub- 
lic. 

Sunday, February 17 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Fleming Rutledge. Curate. Christ 
Church, Episcopal, Rye. New York. The Service of Worship 
is Broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
1 1:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
1 1:30-2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room. West Campus Union. 
Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine Service 
available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center, 505 Alex- 
ander. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "DRACULA." Cast: 
Laurence Olivier, Kate Nellington. Dir.: John Badham. (R.) 
Frank Langella's Broadway portrayal of the count as more 
turnon than menace is effectively magnified on screen. 
Otherwise the film jacks style and cleverness, and is drowned 
in pretentiousness, noise, gore, and excessive action. Page. 
$1.50. 

7:00 p.m. Arts in Duke Chapel presents Organ Recital by Fenner 
Douglass. Chapel. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 

Deadline for the Calendar of February 17th- 
February 24th is Monday February 11th, before 1:00 
p.m. Please note the change in the deadline hours. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION GALLERIES 
EXHIBIT WORKS BY MARGIA KRAMER 

The Duke University Union Galleries presents New 
York artist Margia Kramer exhibiting her art work 
from the 70' s in the East Gallery, East Campus Li- 
brary January 26th-February 29th. Ms. Kramer is a 
visiting Assistant Professor of painting and drawing at 
Duke this semester. There will be a reception for the 
artist Sunday, February 10th, from 3:00-5:00 p.m. in 
the gallery. The public is cordially invited. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION 

GALLERIES EXHIBIT 

WORKS BY KAREN LAUB-NOVAK 

The Duke University Union Galleries presents 
drawings and prints by Washington, D. C. artist, lec- 
turer, and writer Karen Laub-Novak which will be on 
exhibit February 2nd-February 10th in West Gallery. 
A reception for the artist will be held in the West Gal- 
lery, 104 Flowers, on Sunday February 3rd, from 3:00 
p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

THE ASSOCIATION OF DUKE WOMEN 

PRESENTS, 'SIRENS, A WOMEN'S THEATER 

EXTRAVAGANZA'' 

The Association of Duke Women is sponsoring a 
special presentation of Sirens: A Women's Theater 



Extravaganza performed by the Women's Collage 
Theatre live from New York City on Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 10th. Performance time is set for 7:00 p.m. at the 
Rehearsal Hall of the Mary Duke Biddle Music Build- 
ing on East Campus. A "'collage'' play. Sirens is com- 
piled and adapted from the writings of such acclaimed 
authors as Penelope Mortimer, Robin Morgan, 
Dorothy Richardson, and Joanna Russ as well as im- 
provisational material by the cast: actress/playwrights 
Barbara Annsdater and Twila Thompson and director 
Helene Marshall. Through the voices of divergent 
women, past and present, renowned and forgotten. Si- 
tens tells the story of woman in transition, at odds with 
the values and traditions instilled in her. Colorful 
batiked costumes and set. imposing life sized puppets, 
and the best of both comic and dramatic acting bring 
the characters who parade through Anna's mind to 
life. A poet and a bride of the sixteenth century, an 
etiquette teacher and shopping bag lady of the twen- 
tieth, through Anna they are all one and she is all of 
them. General Admission is $2.00. Admission for 
senior citizens and students with identification is 
$1.00. 

■SHUT UP. WE'RE SINGING!" 

"Shut Up, We're Singing!", a potpourri comic 
musical revue written and produced by Duke students 
will present their last performance Sunday, February 
10th. in Fred Theatre on Duke's West Campus at 8:15 
p.m. 

Members of Duke's Hoof n' Horn musical theater 
group have been writing and perfecting this production 
since September. Rick Lukianuk and Scott Smoot, 
both veterans of original revues, wrote the music and 
lyrics for the cast of eight. Lukianuk authored 
"Another Saturday Night." performed at Duke in 
1977. 

Tickets will be on sale at Page Box Office for $2.50. 
Free refreshments will be served at the performances. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 
;15 p.m. in Room 111 of the Biological Sciences 
Building. Coffee an'Time and Tempo in the Dynamics 
of African Lakes" for the Department of Zoology 
Seminar on Monday, February 11th, at 4:15 p.m. in 
Room 1 1 1 of the Biological Sciences Building. Coffee 
and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

N. C. SYMHONY CONCERT WITH 
GUHER AND SUHER PEKINEL, DUO-PIANISTS 

Giiher and Siiher Pekinel, Duo-Pianists, will join the 
North Carolina Symphony Orchestra for a concert on 
Monday, February 11th, at 8:00 p.m., in the Page Au- 
ditorium. Admission will be by season ticket or by 
single concert ticket. Single tickets, priced at $3.00 for 
students, senior citizens, and Symphony Society 
members and $6.00 for others, are available at Page 
Box Office. 

The prize-winning combination of Turkish identical 
twins, Giiher and Siiher Pekinel, has been astonishing 



audiences since their first public appearance at the age 
of six. At nine, they made their first orchestral debut 
and from there have performed at Europe's most pres- 
tigious music festivals and with such outstanding or- 
chestras as the Suisse Romande and the Berlin Sym- 
phony. As duo pianists, they have won prizes at 
America's Duo-Piano Competition and in three pres- 
tigious competitions abroad: Radio Hanover, Radio 
Cologne, and the German competition in Bonn. In ad- 
dition, they have also won numerous prizes as soloists, 
including first prizes for each in the German National 
Competition and the International Competition for 
Young Musicians in Philadelphia. Graduates of the 
Hochschule fur Musik in Frankfurt. Germany, the 
Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, and the Juil- 
liard School in New York, Giiher and Siiher Pekinel 
are electrifying audiences world-wide with their per- 
formances. 

With Conductor John Gosling leading the orchestra, 
the program will include Britten's Four Sea Interludes 
from Peter Grimes; Richard Strauss' Don Juan and 
Dvorak's Symphony No. 9 in E Minor, op. 25 I From 
the New World) and Mozart's Concerto No. 10 in 
E-flat Major for Two Pianos performed by Duo- 
Pianists Giiher and Siiher Pekinel. 

THE UNIVERSITY PROGRAM 
IN GENETICS SEMINAR 

Dr. Bruce Nicklas, Department of Zoology, will 
speak on "Mitosis A Hundred Years Later" for the 
University Program in Genetics Seminar on Tuesday, 
February 12th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. 
Duke Building. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS 
AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Dr. Ronald D. Perkins, Department of Geology, will 
speak on "Microborings and Paleoenvironmental In- 
dicators" for the Plant Systematics and Evolution 
Seminar on Tuesday, February 12th, at 12:30 p.m. in 
Room 130 Biological Sciences Building. Prior to join- 
ing the Geology Department at Duke in 1968, Dr. Per- 
kins held the post of Field Geologist with the Shell Oil 
Company. He holds the doctoral in geology from In- 
diana University. An authority on carbonate 
sedimentation. Dr. Perkins has recently explored mi- 
crobial alteration of marine carbonates, and endolithic 
infestation of submerged carbonate substrates. 

PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Saul Schanberg. M.D.. Ph.D., Department of Phar- 
macology, will speak on "Effect of Maternal Depriva- 
tion on Neuroendocrine Regulation" for the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacology Seminar on Tuesday, February 
12th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke 
Building. 

CAMPUS CLUB MEETINGS 

Dr. Sanders Williams, will speak on "DUPAC", 
"Duke's Approach to the Prevention of Heart Disease 



Through Exercise" for the Campus Club Meeting 
honoring husbands of members, newcomers, and 
working members, on Tuesday, February 12th, at 7:30 
p.m. in the Amphitheater, Duke Hospital. Social hour 
to follow in the Board Room of Hospital. 

CAMPUS CLUB LECTURE SERIES 

The third in a series of four Campus Club lectures 
will be presented on Wednesday, February 13th, at 
10:00 a.m. Professor Elwyn Simons, Director of the 
Duke University Primate Center will speak on 
"Learning from Lemurs." The lecture will be held in 
the Music Room of the East Duke Building and is open 
to the public. Tickets, $4 for the series, are available at 
the door. For further information call 489-6955. 

TRIANGLE DANCE GUILD AT DUKE 

HOSTS WASHINGTON BALLET 

IN WEEK RESIDENCY 

The Duke/Durham Chapter of the Triangle Dance 
Guild will have the Washington Ballet as artists in 
residence from Monday, February 11th, through Fri- 
day, February 15th. The schedule includes two chil- 
dren's performances, each 10:00 a.m. in Page Au- 
ditorium on Wednesday, February 13th and Thursday, 
February 14th. This program is called ""And So To 
Dance" and is a one hour performance narrated by 
Mary Day, Artistic Director of the company. The cur- 
tain rises on the company at work at the ballet bar and 
the action moves from the bar to center stage with 
demonstrations of ballet technique and beginning 
choreography. Two costumed dances follow: the Pas 
de Deux from Flower Festival with choreography by 
Auguste Bournonville and music by Helsted-Paulli, 
and the Snow Pas de Deux from "The Nutcracker" 
with music by Tchaikovsky. 

The audit performance on Friday, February 15th, at 
8:00 p.m. in Page Auditorium will include the follow- 
ing: two works from the company's assistant artistic 
director Choo San Goh; "Untitled" and "Fives," plus 
a duo of ballets from resident choreographer Eric 
Hampton, "Slow Movement" and "Tchaikovsky 
Sketches." Completing the program will be "Tzigane" 
by Tom Pazik of the Atlanta Ballet. 

"Untitled," choreographed by Choo San Goh, is 
a fresh, sunny ballet which was introduced to 
Washington Ballet audiences in 1976. Set to a Vivaldi 
concerto, "Untitled" is an ensemble work set for ten 
members of the company and performed barefoot in 
simple leotards. "Fives" is Goh's landmark ballet set 
on the company in 1977. Choreographed to three 
movements of Ernest Bloch's "Concerto Grosso #1," 
"Fives" prompted the Washington Press to label Goh 
"a major new choreographic talent." 

Eric Hampton's "Slow Movement," which debuted 
on the Washington Ballet last season, was described 
by the Washington Post as "a soulfully poetic pas de 
deux," possessing the delicate, romantic flavor inher- 
ent in most of Hampton's works, set to a score by 
Anton Webern. Hampton's "Tchaikovsky Sketches" 



is set to four excerpts from Tchaikovsky's "The Sea- 
sons." This humorous ballet features the company in a 
light-hearted look at the battle of the sexes. 

Capping the program will be the Washington Ballet 
debut of Tom Pazik's "Tzigane." Set to a fiery score 
by Nicholas Budashkin, this pas de deux flavors clas- 
sic balletic movement with Spanish flamingo dancing. 

As Alan Kriegsman of the Washington Post recently 
stated, "To know where the future of ballet in this 
country is coming from, the Washington Ballet is one 
place you have to look." Don't miss this opportunity 
to sample what the new decade of dance holds — see 
the Washington Ballet. 

Tickets for the children's performances are $1.00 for 
students and $2.00 for others. 

Tickets for the Friday, February 15th performance 
are priced at $4.00 for students and 65 plus, and $5.00 
for the general public. All seats reserved. Mail orders 
may be served at Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, 
N. C. 27706 or purchased at the Box Office, 
Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Purchases may 
also be made by calling 684-3227 from 10:00 a.m. to 
3:00 p.m. and by using Master Charge or Visa Credit 
Cards. 

The week of residency also includes an open Master 
Class on Tuesday, February 12th at 10:30 a.m. -12:00 
noon in the Ark on Duke's East Campus and an open 
Master Class at 7:30 p.m. -9:00 p.m. on the same date 
in the studies of the New Performing Dance Company, 
at Five Points. 

CANCER CENTER SEMINAR 

Dr. William L. Richards, McArdle Laboratory for 
Cancer Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 
will speak on "Rat Liver Neoplasia: Histochemical 
and Biochemical Studies Involving Gamma- 
Glutamyl-Transpeptidase" for the Cancer Center 
Seminar on Wednesday, February 13th, at 12:00 p.m. 
in the Rauch Conference Room — 1st Floor Morris 
Building. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES SEMINAR 

Professor Susan Suleiman of Occidental College will 
give a seminar on "Fiction and Persuasion: Problems 
in the Definition of Didactic Narrative" at 4:00 p.m. on 
Wednesday, February 13th in the Breedlove Room, 
Perkins Library. Professor Suleiman has written on 
theory of narrative and theory of the reader, and is 
completing a book on the roman a these. 

INFORMAL DISCUSSION SESSION 
FOR FACULTY 

On Wednesday, February 13th, Provost William 
Bevan and Chancellor A. Kenneth Pye will host an 
informal discussion session for members of the fac- 
ulty. It will be held from 4:00-5:00 p.m. in the Com- 
mons Room of the Divinity School where coffee will 
be served. After the discussion, the group will adjourn 
to the Rare Book Room in Perkins Library for a sherry 
hour. 






KAPPA DELTA PI 
FEDERAL FUNDING WORKSHOPS 

Lucy Knight. Federal Relations Coordinator at 
Duke, will present the second of two "how to" work- 
shops on federal funding on February 13th. "Federal 
Funding Workshop II" will be held at 8:00 p.m. 
through 10:00 p.m. in West Duke Building. Room 105. 

Ms. Knight, who holds an M.A.T. degree in social 
studies from Weslyan University, edited Education 
Funding News, a national weekly newsletter on fed- 
eral funding in education. Her responsibilities as Fed- 
eral Relations Coordinator include presenting the 
funding workshop to groups of Duke faculty members. 

Federal Funding Workshops I and II will cover 
elementary/secondary education and higher education, 
respectively. In each presentation Ms. Knight will 
compare the roles of the Office of Education, the Na- 
tional Institute for Education, and the National En- 
dowments for the Arts and Humanities in the funding 
of education projects. She will discuss the timing of 
proposals, funding of programs and research resources 
to help you obtain funds for your project. 

JERRY BRUNO SPEAKS ON 
POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS 

Jerry Bruno, advance man for John and Robert 
Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson presidential cam- 
paigns, will speak on Political Campaigns for the Duke 
Institute for Learning in Retirement on Thursday, 
February 14th, at 1:30 p.m. at the Campus Center. 
East Campus. 

MEETING OF THE UNDERGRADUATE 
FACULTY COUNCIL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

There will be a meeting of the Undergraduate Fac- 
ulty Council of Arts and Sciences on Thursday, Feb- 
ruary 14th, at 3:45 p.m., in 139 Social Sciences. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Myron L. Wolbarsht, Departments of Ophthal- 
mology Biomedical Engineering, and Physiology, will 
speak on "The Rationale of Oxygen Therapy For 
Diabetic Retinopathy" for the Department of Physiol- 
ogy Seminar on Thursday, February 14th, at 4:00 p.m. 
in Room 385 MSIA. Coffee and cookies will be served 
at 3:45 p.m. 

GERMAN DEPARTMENT FILM EXHIBITION 

The Department of German will present the second 
showing of short films by the artists featured in the 
exhibition ""Film as Film" (in Perkins Library through 
February). 

II. Thursday. February 14th, 7-8:30 p.m., Room 226 
Perkins: Films by Graeff, Fischinger, Leger, Man Ray, 
Duchamp. 

The program will be introduced by Professor Inez 
Hedges. 



CANCER CENTER SEMINAR 

Dr. Angie Rizzino, Department of Biology, Univer- 
sity of California. San Diego, will speak on "The 
Growth and Differentiation of Embryonal Carcinoma 
Cells in Hormone Supplemented Defined Media" for 
the Cancer Center Seminar on Friday, February 15th, 
at 12:00 p.m. in the Rauch Conference Room — 1st 
Floor Morris Building. 

BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

J.J. Blum, Department of Physiology, will speak on 
"Flagellar Motility: Biophysics of Dynein- 
Microtubule Interaction and Biochemistry of a 
Calmodulin-Mediated Calcium Control System" for 
the Department of Biochemistry Seminar on Friday, 
February 15th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. 
Duke Building. Coffee will be served at 12:15 p.m. in 
the lobby. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Elizabeth Flint Patterson, Graduate Student. De- 
partment of Botany, will speak on "Aspects of the 
Ecology of Diploid and Tetraploid Races of Fireweed, 
Epilobium Angustifolium for the Plant Ecology Semi- 
nar on Friday, February 15th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 
144 Biological Sciences Building. 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. D. M. Pond of Tennessee Eastman Company 
will present a seminar entitled "Research at Tennessee 
Eastman" on Friday, February 15th, at 3:30 p.m. in 
Room 103 Gross Chemical Laboratory. Refreshments 
will be served in the Lobby at 3:10 p.m. 

FACULTY AND GUEST RECITAL 

GIORGIO CIOMPI, BOAZ SHARON, 

AND ARTURO CIOMPI 

A recital of early and middle twentieth century 
music for violin, clarinet and piano music will be per- 
formed by Giorgio Ciompi, Arturo Ciompi and Boaz 
Sharon on Saturday evening, Fegruary 16th, at 8:15 
p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. Sponsored by the 
Department of Music, the concert is open to the public 
without charge. 

Giorgio Ciompi, violinist, is founder of the Ciompi 
Quartet and has been artist-in-residence at Duke Uni- 
versity since 1964. A native of Florence, Italy, he was 
an established violinist on the Continent before coming 
to the States in 1948 for a concert tour and a Carnegie 
Hall debut. That same year at the invitation of Arturo 
Toscanini, Mr. Ciompi became a member of the NBC 
Symphony Orchestra, and for several years was also a 
member of the Saidenberg Little Symphony, New 
York City. Beginning in 1949 he toured internationally 
for fifteen years with the Albeneri Trio. From 1954- 
1964 Mr. Ciompi was Head of the Violin Department 
at the Cleveland Institute of Music and first violinist in 
its String Quartet. He participated in the Casals and 



Aspen Festivals and each summer performs and is a 
faculty member at the Kneisel Hall Summer School. 
Ciompi studied under Enesco and Alexanian and is 
recipient of the Premier Prix du Conservatoire in Paris. 
Today, he is recognized as an international concert 
and recording artist. 

Arturo Ciompi. clarinetist, holds degrees from the 
North Carolina School of the Arts and the State Uni- 
versity of New York at Stony Brook. Mr. Ciompi was 
a winner of the North Carolina Symphony Young Ar- 
tists competition, and a scholarship winner for study in 
Italy. He has performed with the American Sym- 
phony, New York City Opera, Orpheus Ensemble, 
Caramoor Festival, Chamber Music Northwest, 
Kneisel Hall Festival, and the Sylvan Wind Quintet. 
Mr. Ciompi has premiered many works and has re- 
corded for Columbia Records. He has been Assistant 
Professor at the State University of New York at Al- 
bany and is presently teaching clarinet at Princeton 
University. Mr. Ciompi is the son of Giorgio Ciompi. 

Israeli-born Boaz Sharon pursued his piano studies 
with Stefan Askenase in Brussels, and Leonard Shure 
in the U. S. He is the recipient of several awards in- 
cluding first prizes in the Jaen International Piano 
Competition in Jaen, Spain; the Young Musicians 
Foundational National Competition in Los Angeles, 
and the M.T.N. A. National Competition. He has ap- 
peared in recitals in the U. S.. Israel, Europe and 
Canada, and performed on broadcasts on the Belgian 
and Israeli radio networks and on a number of radio 
stations in the U. S. He has appeared as soloist with 
the Israeli Symphony, the Debut Orchestra of Los 
Angeles and the Chautauqua Symphony among others. 
Since 1976 Mr. Sharon is Pianist-in-Residence and 
Lecturer on the music faculty at Duke University. In 
the near future his recently released album entitled, 
"Piano works by Charles Koechlin," will be nationally 
broadcast on the radio show, "Matinee." 

The program follows: 



Sonate(1916) 
Allegro vivo 

Intermede — fantasque et leger 
Finale — tres anime 

Excerpts from Les Heures Persanes, 
Opus 65 (1916) 
Matin frais, dans la haute vallee 
Derviches dans la nuit 

Sonate (1962) 

Allegro tristamente 
Romanza 
Allegro con fuoco 

Duo Concertant (1931-32) 
Cantilene 
Eglogue I 
Eglogue II 
Gigue 
Dithyrambe 

Excerpts from Les Confidences d'un Jouer de Clarineite Koechlin 
and Monodies. Opus 141 & 216 (1934 & 1948) 
Le Bouquet de fleurs des champs de Margredel 
Pastorale 

La chasse d'Artemis 
Romance de Kasper 

L'histoire d'un soldal (1916) 



Debussy 
(1862-1918) 



Charles Koechlin 
(1867-1950) 



Poulenc 
(1899-1963) 



Stravinsky 
(1882-1971) 



The Soldier's March 
The Soldier's Violin 
A Little Concert 
Tango — Waltz — Ragtime 
The Devil's Dance 

ARTS IN DUKE CHAPEL PRESENTS 
ORGAN RECITAL BY FENNER DOUGLASS 

Arts in Duke Chapel presents an Organ Recital by 
Fenner Douglass, University Organist on the Benja- 
min N. Duke Memorial Organ in Duke University 
Chapel on Sunday. February 17th, at 7:00 p.m. The 
recital series on the Benjamin N. Duke Memorial 
Organ is made possible through the generous support 
of the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, the Friends of 
the Chapel, the James T. Cleland Endowment Fund 
for the Duke Chapel, and the Marvin B. and Elvira 
Lowe Smith Memorial Fund, established by their 
daughter, Alyse Smith Cooper. 

Fenner Douglass is Professor of Music and Univer- 
sity Organist. He is the author of The Language of the 
Classical French Organ (Yale University Press, 1969) 
and Cava Hie — Coll and the Musicians (Sunbury, 
1980). He is known also as a lecturer, recitalist, and 
consultant on organ design. 

The program follows: 



Voluntary in F, Op. 7, #6 



Praeambulum in d (WV 34) 



John Stanley 
(1713-1786) 

Heinrich Scheidemann 

(1596-1663) 

Two verses on the Chorale: Dietrich Buxtehude 

Von Goir wilt ich nicht lassen (BuxWV 220, 221) (1637-1707) 

Praeludium in a (BuxWV 153) Buxtehude 

Fantasie in C. Opus 16 Cesar Franck 

(1822-1890) 
Canonic Variations of the 
Christmas Chorale: Johann Sebastian Bach 

Vom Himmel hoch da komm' ich her (1747), S. 769 (1685-1750) 
I. Cantus firmus im Pedal (Canon all' Ottava) 
II. Cantus firmus im Pedal (Canon alia Quintal 

III. Cantus firmus im Sopran (Canon alia Settima) 

IV. Cantus firmus im Pedal (Canon all' Ottava per augmen- 
tationem) 

V. L'altra sorte del Canone al rovescio: 

1) alia Sesta, 2) alia Terza. 3) alia Seconda, e 4) alia Nona- 
diminuzione-alla stretto 
Passacaglia in c minor, S. 582 Bach 

THE ANNE FLEXNER MEMORIAL AWARD 
FOR CREATIVE WRITING 

The Anne Flexner Memorial Award is offered annu- 
ally for the best piece of creative writing submitted by 
an undergraduate student at Duke University. 



First Prize 
Second Prize 
Third Prize 



$200.00 
$100.00 
$ 50.00 



CONDITIONS 
1. The prize is open to all undergraduates, both men 
and women. 

Stravinsky 2. Only short stories (7500-word limit), one-act plays 






(7500-word limit), and poetry (200-line limit) are 
eligible. 

3. Only one manuscript may be submitted by any 
contestant. 

4. All manuscripts must be typed double spaced and 
must be delivered to the English Office (325 Allen 
Building) by 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday. 19 March. 
The author's name and address must appear 
nowhere except on a separate sheet placed before 
the manuscript. 

OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 
SHORT COURSES 

The Duke University Office of Continuing Educa- 
tion offers a variety of short courses to area residents. 
Registration is open to the public, without prerequi- 
site. The program is designed to help among others, 
those who: Promised themselves some time for per- 
sonal enrichment through study of literature, art, 
music, or political science; Intend to conquer anxieties 
about personal communications, public speaking, 
computers, or writing; Want a better 1980 by building 
new skills, dusting off old ones, learning a craft or 
starting to exercise. A descriptive brochure is avail- 
able upon request to the Office of Continuing Educa- 
tion, 107 Bivins, Duke University, Durham, N. C. 
27708, telephone 684-6259. Classes meet in daytime, 
evening, and weekend sessions. Early enrollment is 
encouraged, as many classes have limited enrollment. 

Course Teacher Time 

Masterpieces of 

Symphonic Literature Larry Todd Mon. evening 

Liberalism. Conservatism. 

and Socialism Thomas Spragens Mon. evening 

The Golden Age of Yiddish 

Literature Arthur Tilo Alt Sun. afternoon 

Understanding Nutrition 



Women in Modern Fiction 
Pre-Columbian Art of 

the Andes 
Leadership Seminar 
Dancercise 



Arthur Tilo Alt 
Joe and 

Theresa Graedon 

with Mary Bemheim Tues. evening 
Judith Ruderman Mon. morning 



Paul Clifford 
Dave Kiel 
Beverly McCraw 



Thurs. evening 

Thurs. evening 

Tues.. Thurs. & 

Fri. mornings 



Lost Art of Hand 
Bookbinding Resurrected 
English as a 

Second Language 
Speaking in Public 
Words as Tools 
Computer Anxiety 
Communication Skills 
GRE Informational Session 
Alternative Careers for 

Teachers 



Thelma George 



Tues. evening 



Mary Bobbitt-Cooke Mon. evening 

Gillian Plescia Mon. evening 

Lucy Knight Thurs. evening 

Scott Herman-Giddens Wed. evening 

William Friedman Wed. evening 

JeanOBarr Wed. night 

Sat.. March 29 



Most classes begin the week of February 11th. In- 
cluded are courses in literature, nutrition, politics, 
communications, and music. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Robert Jeffrey Parsons for the Ph.D. 
degree in English was held on Wednesday, January 23rd. The sub- 
ject of Mr. Parson's dissertation was "Autobiographical and Ar- 
chetypal Elements in the Verse of the Third Lord North." The 
The committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors 
Dale B. J. Randall, presiding, A. Leigh DeNeef. George Williams, 
Buford Jones, and Elgin Mellown. 



The final examination of Mr. Walter Earle Fowler for the Ph.D. 
degree in Pharmacology was held on Wednesday. January 30th. The 
subject of Mr. Fowler's dissertation was "The Structure of Fibrino- 
gen and its Intermolecular Associations." The committee conduct- 
ing the examination consisted of Professors Harold P. Erickson, 
presiding, Frederick Bernheim, Thorir Bjornsson, Jacob J. Blum, 
and Norman Kirshner. 

DUKE HOMESITES— HOUSES FOR SALE 

Only those homes located on lots originally de- 
veloped and sold by the University and which are still 
owned by a member of the faculty or staff of the Uni- 
versity will be listed in the University Calendar. Call 
Fred E. Miller at extension 2054 for information re- 
garding listings. Call the appropriate number listed 
below for information regarding a particular house. 
Location: 15 Scott Place 
Phone: 489-8316 
Number of Bedrooms: Five (5) 
Number of Baths: 2Vz 
Type of heating/air conditioning: 

Heat pump/Central Air. 






DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR^ 




February 17-24, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published February 15, 1980 



Number 19 



Sunday, February 17 

January 26th-February 29th. D. U. U. Galleries Exhibit: Works by 

Margia Kramer. East Gallery, East Campus Library. 
January 28th-February 29th Canadian Art Exhibit: "TIME TO 
DRAW" East Campus Art Museum. 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Fleming Rutledge. Curate. Christ 
Church, Episcopal, Rye, New York. The Service of Worship 
is Broadcast over WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room. East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
1 1:30-2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus Union. 
Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine Service 
available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center. 505 Alex- 
ander. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "DRACULA". Cast: 
Laurence Olivier. Kate Nellington. Dir.: John Badham. (R.) 
Frank Langella's Broadway portrayal of the count as more 
turn on than menace is effectively magnified on screen. Page. 
SI. 50. 

7:00 p.m. Arts in Duke Chapel presents Organ Recital by Fenner 
Douglass. Chapel. 

8:30 p.m. D. U. U. Special Events Committee: "LIFESAVER." 
EDMR. Duke Students Free: SI. 50 Gen. Public. 

Monday, February 18 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:30 p.m. University Review Committee Meeting. Board Room, 

Allen Bldg. 
4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Robert Zaret. 

Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. 
8:15 p.m. Senior Recital: Jim Lee, Baritone and Kathryn Huestis, 

Pianist. EDMR. 

Tuesday, February 19 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics & Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
Donald E. Schnell. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. 

4:00 p.m. Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Mohyee Eldefrawl. 
Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Mathematics Colloquium. Speaker: Dr. Naomi 
Jochnowitz. Rm. 124 Physics Bldg. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Eucharist. Duke Chapel Crypt. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "SANSHIRO SUGATA" 
(Kurosawas Judo Saga). Stars Susuma Fujita, Denjiro 
Okoohi. Takashi Shimura. Kurosawa's first film, commis- 
sioned as wartime propaganda — it actually portrays the 
struggle of a young man who comes in conflict with the ju- 
jitsu masters when he strives to achieve his identity by mas- 
tering judo. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free: Others 
SI. 50. 

8:00 p.m. Aging in the Eighties Lecture Series. Speaker: Leonard 
Hayflick. Searle Center, DUMC. 



Wednesday, February 20 

8:00 a.m. Ash Wednesday Service. Episcopal Eucharist with Im- 
position of Ashes. York Chapel. Divinity School. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30-1:30 p.m. Dept. of Education Spring Symposium. Speaker: 
Cleveland Hammond. Rm. 202 West Duke Bldg. 

1:00-2:30 p.m. Political Science Dept. Colloquium Series. 
Speaker: Prof. Ronald Rogowski. 204 Perkins Library. 

3:00 p.m. International Security Affairs Seminar. Speaker: R. 
James Woolsey. 226 Perkins Library. 

5:15 p.m. Ash Wednesday Service. Episcopal Eucharist with the 
Imposition of Ashes. York Chapel, Divinity School. 

7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services Program Performing Arts 
Series: Triangle, contemporary folk music, guitar, violin. 
viola & voice. Main Lobby. Hospital. 

7:30 p.m. BASKETBALL: Duke vs. Clemson. 

8:00 p.m. Religion & Public Affairs Lecture. Speaker: Yehoshua 
Arieli. Duke Divinity Alumni Lounge. 

Thursday, February 21 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

1:30 p.m. Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement. Speaker: Dr. 
Orrin H. Pilkey. Campus Center East Campus. 

3:30 p.m. Institute of Policy Sciences & Public Affairs Col- 
loquium. Speaker: Suzanne H. Woolsey. Allen Bldg. Board 
Rm. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Physiology Seminar. Speaker: Donald M. Bers. 
Rm. 385 MSIA. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Memorial Chapel, Duke 
Chapel. 

7:00 p.m. FENCING: Duke Men & Women vs. UNC. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "CHARADE" Dir.: Stanley 
Donen. With Audrey Hepburn, Walter Matthau, James 
Coburn. A suave mystery set in Paris in which Can Grant 
aids widow Hepburn to recover a fortune hidden by her hus- 
band and sought by a trio of sinister crooks. Bio. Sci. Duke 
Undergrads w ID Free: Others $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "RING ROUNDTHE MOON." Branson 
Theatre. Tickets available at Page, $4, S3. & all Thursday 
seats $2.50. 

Friday, February 22 

Last day for reporting midsemester grades. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

12:00 Noon Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 
011 (PCRl Baldwin Aud. Basement. 

12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Michael J. 
Holland. Rm. 147 Nanaline' H. Duke Bldg. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Ruth Shaw. Rm. 144 

Bio. Sci. 
7:00. 9:30 p.m. & Midnight Freewater Films: "FEDORA." Dir.: 
Billy Wilder. Stars William Holden. Marthe Keller. She was 
Fedora. Hollywood's most beautiful movie queen, who chose 
to retire to complete seclusion. What was the dark secret of 
her brilliant career and her years as a recluse ? PG. Bio. Sci. 
Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others SI. 50. 
7:30 p.m. WRESTLING: Duke vs. Univ. of Va. 



8:15 p.m. DUKE UNIVERSITY WIND SYMPHONY- 
ANNUAL VIENNESE BALL. Durham Civic Center. $3.50 
per person at door. 

8:15 p.m. THIRTIETH ANNIVERSARY CONCERT -- by 
Loren Withers, pianist. Page Aud. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: -RING ROUND THE MOON." Branson 
Theatre. Tickets available at Page, $4, $3. & all Thursday 
seats $2.50. 

Saturday, February 23 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:30 a.m. Freewater Films: "PINOCCHIO." (Children) Walt Dis- 
ney Animated Feature. Well loved tale about the adventures 
of Pinocchio, the puppet who becomes a boy. and his friend, 
Jiminy Cricket. Oscars for best original score and best song, 
'When You Wish Upon A Star.'" Plus the short: Bread And 
A Street. B/W. Gross Chem. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free: 
Others SI. 50. 
12:00 noon WRESTLING: Tri-Meet: Duke, Citadel. & Ga. Tech. 
5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: 'SAME TIME, NEXT 
YEAR." Couple nurture once-a-year extramarital affair for 
26 years. Dir.: Robert Mulligan. Stars: Ellen Burstyn and 
Alan Alda. PG. Page. $1.50. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "RING ROUND THE MOON". Branson 
Theatre. Tickets available at Page. S4, $3. & all Thursday 
seats S2.50. 
8:15 p.m. Chamber Arts Society: JUILLIARD QUARTET. 
EDMR. $6.00 at door. 

Sunday, February 24 

9:30 & 1 1:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Richard Lischer, Asst. Profes- 
sor of Homiletics, Duke Divinity School. The Service of 
Worship is Broadcast over WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
1 1:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room. East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus 
L'nion. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center. 505 Alex- 
ander. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "SAME TIME, NEXT 
YEAR." Couple nurture once-a-year extramarital affair for 
26 years. Dir.: Robert Mulligan. Stars: Ellen Burstyn and 
Alan Alda. PG. Page. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Senior Organ Recital by Allen Dean. Duke Chapel. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "RING ROUND THE MOON." Branson 
Theatre. Tickets available at Page. $4. $3, & all Thursday 
seats $2.50. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION GALLERIES 
EXHIBIT WORKS BY MARGIA KRAMER 

The Duke University Union Galleries presents New 
York artist Margia Kramer exhibiting her art work 
from the 70' s in the East Gallery, East Campus Li- 
brary January 26th-February 29th. Ms. Kramer is a 
visiting Assistant Professor of painting and drawing at 
Duke this semester. The public is cordially invited. 

ARTS IN DUKE CHAPEL PRESENTS 
ORGAN RECITAL BY FENNER DOUGLASS 

Arts in Duke Chapel presents an Organ Recital by 
Fenner Douglass. University Organist on the Benja- 
min N. Duke Memorial Organ in Duke University 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for S3. 50. payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 

Deadline for the Calendar of February 24th- 
March 2nd is Monday. February 18th, before 1:00 
p.m. Please note the change in the deadline hour. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



Chapel on Sunday, February 17th, at 7:00 p.m. The 
recital series on the Benjamin N. Duke Memorial 
Organ is made possible through the generous support 
of the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, the Friends of 
the Chapel, the James T. Cleland Endowment Fund 
for the Duke Chapel, and the Marvin B. and Elvira 
Lowe Smith Memorial Fund, established by their 
daughter. Alyse Smith Cooper. 

Fenner Douglass is Professor of Music and Univer- 
sity Organist. He is the author of The Language of the 
Classical French Organ (Yale University Press. 1969) 
and Cavaille — Coll and the Musicians (Sunbury. 
1980). He is known also as a lecturer, recitalist, and 
consultant on organ design. 

The program follows: 

Voluntary in F. Op. 7. #6 John Stanley 

(1713-1786) 

Praeambulum in d (WV 34) Heinrich Scheidemann 

(1596-1663) 

Two verses on the Chorale: Dietrich Buxtehude 

Von Gott will ich nicht lussen (BuxWV 220, 221) (1637-1707) 

Praeludium in a (BuxWV 153) Buxtehude 

Fantasie in C, Opus 16 Cesar Franck 

(1822-1890) 
Canonic Variations of the 

Christmas Chorale: Johann Sebastian Bach 

Vom Himmel hoch da komm ich her (1747), S. 769 (1685-1750) 
I. Cantus firmus im Pedal (Canon all' Ottava) 
II. Cantus firmus im Pedal (Canon alia Quintal 



III. Cantus firmus im Sopran (Canon alia Setlima) 

IV. Cantus firmus im Pedal (Canon all' Ottava per augmen- 
tationem) 

V. L'altra sorte del Canone al rovescio: 

1 ) alia Sesta. 21 alia Terza. 3) alia Seconda, e 4) alia Nona- 
diminuzione-alla stretlo 
Passacaglia in c minor, S. 582 Bach 

DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION 

SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE PRESENTS 

"LIFESAVER" 

The Duke University Union Special Events Com- 
mittee presents The Independent Eye, a nationally 
acclaimed touring theatre. The group will be at Duke 
to present their most recent work. Life saver, a dra- 
matic study of "job burn-out,'" an increasing concern 
of many contemporary workers. The play will be held 
Sunday. February 17th. at 8:30 p.m. in the Music 
Room of the East Duke Building on the East Campus. 

The Independent Eye describes its brand of theatre 
as based on a close, objective look at basic human 
behavior, depending on a combination of accuracy and 
entertainment value to elicit audience identification 
with the situations. They explain, "We try not to sepa- 
rate ourselves from our audiences. Theatrical sharing 
allows us to celebrate all being together in the same 
leaky boat." 

Admission is free for all Duke students, $1.50, gen- 
eral admission, for all others. Tickets will be sold at 
the door. 

UNIVERSITY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING 

The University Review Committee on the Use of 
Human Subjects in Non-Medical Research will meet 
on Monday, February 18th, at 3:30 p.m. in the Board 
Room of Allen Building. All materials (copy of re- 
search proposal, completed protocol, and completed 
federal forms, if applicable) must be submitted to the 
committee secretary, Robert Sawyer. 215 Allen 
Building, by noon on the Wednesday preceding the 
regular meeting. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Robert Zaret, Department of Zoology, will 
speak on "Interactions between Zooplankters and 
Water" for the Department of Zoology Seminar on 
Monday, February 18th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 1 1 1 of 
the Biological Sciences Building. Coffee and tea will 
be served at 4:00 p.m. 

SENIOR RECITAL BY 
JIM LEE AND KATHRYN HUESTIS 

The Duke University Department of Music will pre- 
sent Jim Lee, baritone, with Kathryn Huestis, pianist, 
in his Senior Recital on Monday evening, February 
18th. at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. In- 
cluded in the evening's voice recital are works by 
Barber. Faure, Mahler, Ponchielli and Ambroise 
Thomas. The public is invited. Admission is free. 



Jim Lee, a senior English major from Monroe, 
North Carolina, has been a member of the Duke Uni- 
versity Chorale for the past four years, as well as a 
member of the Chapel Choir, the choir of the St. 
Stephen's Episcopal Church, and the Duke Opera 
Workshop. He will tour this summer in Europe with 
the Methodist Festival Choir. 

Kathryn Huestis, accompanist for the D. U. De- 
partment of Music, has played in many recitals in this 
area as well as serving as accompanist for the Duke 
Opera Workshop. She also teaches private lessons. 

The program follows: 

I. Songs Gabriel Faure 

Lydia 

Dan les Ruines dune Abbaye 
Le Secret 
Fleur Jetee 



II. Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen ( 1884) 
Wenn mein Schatz Hochzeit macht 
Ging heut Morgen iiber's Feld 
Ich hab' ein gluhend Messer 
Die zwei Blauen Augen 
III. Dover Beach 
IV. Arias 

Ah! Pescator from 

La Gioconda (1876) 
O vin, disippe la tristesse from 
Hamlet (1868) 



Gustav Mahler 



Samuel Barber 



Amilcare Ponchielli 
Ambroise Thomas 



PLANT SYSTEMATICS 
AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Dr. Donald E. Schnell will speak on "Infraspecific 
variation in the southeastern pitcher plant. Sarracenia 
rubra" for the Plant Systematics and Evolution Semi- 
nar on Tuesday, February 19th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 
130 Biological Sciences. Dr. Schnell is a practicing 
pathologist at Statesville. N. C, having botany as an 
avocation. He has published a book on the carnivorous 
plants of the U.S. and Canada, and maintains a pri- 
vate garden collection of more than one hundred 
species. Dr. Schnell holds the M.D. degree from the 
Ohio State University. 

PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Mohyee Eldefrawi. Ph.D.. Department of Phar- 
macology and Experimental Therapeutics, University 
of Maryland School of Medicine, will speak on "Ion 
Channels: Structure and Function" for the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacology Seminar on Tuesday. February 
19th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 147 in the Nanaline H. 
Duke Building. Coffee will be served in the lobby at 
3:45 p.m. 

MATHEMATICS COLLOQUIUM 

Dr. Naomi Jochnowitz of Brown University will 
present the Mathematics Colloquium lecture on "Con- 
gruences in the Hecke Ring on Modular Forms," to be 
held on Tuesday, February 19th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
124 Physics Building. Refreshments will be served at 
3:30 in Room 138 Physics Building. All interested per- 
sons are cordially invited to attend. 



CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF AGING 

AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

25TH ANNIVERSARY LECTURE SERIES 

A Special 25th Anniversary Lecture Series on Aging 
in the Eighties will be held Tuesday, February 19th, at 
8:00 p.m. in Searle Center, University Medical Center. 

Leonard Hayflick, Senior Research, Cell Biologist, 
Children's Hospital, Medical Center, Oakland, 
California, will speak on "Increasing Life Expectancy: 
How Much? How Likely?" 

For free ticket information call Miss Betty Ray, 
684-2248. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
SPRING SYMPOSIUM 

Cleveland Hammonds, Superintendent, Durham 
City Schools, will speak on "Public Decisions in Pub- 
lic Places" for the Department of Education Spring 
Symposium on Wednesday, February 20th, at 12:30 
p.m. -1:30 p.m. in Room 202 West Duke Building. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 
COLLOQUIUM SERIES 

Professor Ronald Rogowski, Duke University, will 
speak on "Party Systems and Party Support: Recent 
Evidence from Europe" for the Political Science De- 
partment Colloquium Series on Wednesday, February 
20th, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. in 204 Perkins Li- 
brary. 

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY 
AFFAIRS SEMINAR 

R. James Woolsey, Under Secretary of the Navy, 
will speak before the International Security Affairs 
Seminar co-sponsored by the Department of Political 
Science, the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense at 
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and 
the Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs on 
Wednesday, February 20th, at 3:00 p.m. in 226 Perkins 
Library on the Duke Campus. 

RELIGION AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURES 

The Department of Religion is sponsoring a series of 
Conversations with National Humanities Scholars on 
"Religion and Public Affairs: Historical and Contem- 
porary Perspectives," which are held in the Duke Di- 
vinity Alumni Lounge at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, 
February 20th. The speaker for the third lecture will be 
Yehoshua Arieli (History, Hebrew University. 
Jerusalem), speaking on "Two Interpretations of 
American Nationality: Enlightenment and Clergy." 

DUKE INSTITUTE 
FOR LEARNING IN RETIREMENT 

Dr. Orrin H. Pilkey, Department of Geology, will 
speak on "North Carolina Coastline and its Beaches," 
for the Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement on 
Thursday, February 21st, at 1:30 p.m. at the Campus 
Center on East Campus. 



INSTITUTE OF POLICY SCIENCES 
AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS COLLOQUIUM 

Suzanne H. Woolsey, Associate Director of Human 
and Community Affairs of the Office of Management 
and Budget, will speak on "The Fate of Social Pro- 
grams in an Age of Fiscal Austerity" for the Duke 
Colloquium sponsored by the Institute of Policy Sci- 
ences and Public Affairs on Thursday, February 21st, 
at 3:30 p.m., in the Allen Building Board Room. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR 

Donald M. Bers, Department of Physiology, Uni- 
versity of Edinburgh, will speak on "Cardiac Muscle 
Contractility: Sacrolemmal Ca Binding and Na-Ca Ex- 
change"' for the Department of Physiology Seminar on 
Thursday, February 21st, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 385 
MSIA. Coffee and cookies will be served at 3:45 p.m. 

DUKE PLAYERS PRESENT 
RING ROUND THE MOON 

The Duke Players continue their 50th season with a 
production of the classic comedy Ring Round the 
Moon by Jean Anouilh. Eight performances are 
scheduled for February 21st-24th and February 28th- 
March 2nd at 8:15 p.m. each evening in Branson 
Theatre. 

Set in the winter-garden of an elegant French 
chateau in the 1930s, the production will feature sce- 
nery and costumes by resident designers Ron Regier 
and Doreen Wetzel. The cast of twelve Duke students 
is under the direction of Richard Aumiller, who di- 
rected the Players' Fall production of As You Like It. 

The intricate farce plot revolves around twin 
brothers and the attempt by one to disrupt the mis- 
guided marriage plans of the other. At a ball held to 
announce the engagement, the eccentric guests and 
their hostess, the twins' dowager aunt, become in- 
volved, one by one, in the ever-more-complicated 
plot. 

Tickets are on sale now at Page Box Office. Center 
Section seats are $4.00, Side Section seats are $3.00, 
and all Thursday seats are $2.50. Tickets can also be 
purchased using Mastercharge or Visa by phoning 
684-3227 between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 
p.m. weekdays. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

Michael J. Holland, Department of Biochemistry, 
University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, 
Connecticut, will speak on "Structure, Organization, 
and Expression of Yeast Glycolytic Genes" for the 
Department of Biochemistry Seminar on Friday, Feb- 
ruary 22nd, at 12:30 p.m., in Room 147 Nanaline H. 
Duke Building. Coffee will be served at 12:15 p.m. in 
the lobby. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Ruth Shaw, Graduate Student, Department of 
Botany, will speak on "Response to Density in Salvia 



Lyrnta: An Ecological -Genetic Approach" for the 
Plant Ecology Seminar on Friday, February 22nd, at 
12:30 p.m. in Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY WIND SYMPHONY 

ANNUAL VIENNESE BALL 

On Friday evening, February 22nd the melodies of 
Viennese waltzes and polkas will fill the air as the 
Duke University Wind Symphony again presents its 
annual Viennese Ball. The ball will begin at 8:15 p.m. 
at the Durham Civic Center. The dress code is either 
semi-formal or formal according to your own taste, 
and the admission is $3.50 per person at the door. Re- 
freshments will be provided. . . . and, 1,2.3, . . . and 
waltz. 

••THIRTIETH ANNIVERSARY CONCERT" 
BY LOREN WITHERS. PIANIST 

A "Thirtieth Anniversary Concert" will be given by 
Loren Withers, pianist, on Friday, February 22nd at 
8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. The concert which is 
sponsored by the Duke University Department of 
Music will include works by Beethoven, Chopin and 
Mussorgsky. The public is invited. Admission is free. 

Loren Withers is Head of the Piano Faculty at Duke 
University. Missouri born, he received his formal 
training at the University of Kansas and at the Juilliard 
School of Music. His advanced piano training under 
Ernest Hutcheson, James Friskin and Carl Friedberg, 
culminated in a Carnegie Recital Hall concert prior to 
his joining the Duke faculty in 1949. 

Withers has a distinguished reputation as performer 
and teacher. He has appeared as a recitalist, concerto 
performer with symphony orchestras, as a chamber 
music pianist, and as a conductor of master classes and 
workshops from coast to coast. A series often televi- 
sion programs entitled. "Piano Sessions," was shown 
four times on the North Carolina Educational TV net- 
work. While on sabbatical leave during the spring of 
1971, he was invited to replace the head of the piano 
department at the University of Cincinnati. 

Withers was honored by the Music Teachers Na- 
tional Association with their "Teacher of the Year" 
award. He has held numerous state, regional, and na- 
tional offices in the organization including National 
Chairman of the Piano Section. In 1976 he received the 
"Citation of Merit for Significant Contributions to the 
Art of Music." the first biennial citation awarded by 
the North Carolina Music Teachers Association. 

The program follows: 

Sonata in C. Op. 53 ("Waldstein") Beethoven 

Allegro con brio (1770-1827) 

Introduzione: Adagio molto; 
Rondo: Allegretto moderato 
Ballade in F minor. Op. 52 Chopin 

(1810-1849) 
Scherzo in B'' minor. Op. 31 • 
Pictures at an Exhibition Mussorgsky 

Promenade (1839-1881) 

The Gnome 

Promenade 



The Old Castle 

Promenade 

Children at Play 

The Ox Cart 

Promenade 

Ballet of the Chicks 

Rich and Poor 

The Market Place 

In the Catacombs 

The Hut on Fowl's Legs 

The Great Gate at Kiev 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
JUILLIARD QUARTET 

The Chamber Arts Society will present the Juilliard 
String Quartet at 8:15 p.m. on February 23rd at the 
East Duke Music Room. A limited number of tickets, 
priced at $6.00, will be on sale at the door starting at 
7:30 p.m. 

The Juilliard String Quartet, the world's "first fam- 
ily of chamber music," stands pre-eminent among to- 
day's great chamber music groups, ranks as the undis- 
puted top American quartet and is recognized 
everywhere as one of the great quartets of history. It 
has, in fact, set a standard of excellence for an entire 
generation. 

The Juilliard's influence on present and future 
chamber music is incalculable since its function from 
its founding as quartet-in-residence at the Juilliard 
School has included training the cream of young strong 
players in the rich chamber music repertory. Many of 
today's topflight chamber music players received their 
schooling at the hands of the Juilliard foursome. They 
are also quartet-in-residence at the Library of Con- 
gress in the nation's capital, where they play an annual 
series of twenty concerts on the priceless Stradivarius 
instruments willed to the people of the United States 
by Gertrude Clarke Whittall. The Juilliard Quartet has 
played concerts in every corner of the globe: its annual 
tours take it to the music capitals of every continent 
and its concerts have been a feature of all the world's 
great music festivals. It is especially noted for its 
playing of complete cycles of all the Quartets of 
Beethoven. 

All the members of the Juilliard Quartet are 
American-born and American-trained. Founder/First 
Violinist Robert Mann is a native of Portland, Oregon, 
Second Violinist Earl Carlyss was born in Chicago, 
Violist Samuel Rhodes is from New York City and 
Cellist Joel Krosnick was born in Hartford, Connec- 
ticut. 

Recordings made by the Juilliard Quartet number 
close to an even hundred — among them the complete 
Beethoven Quartets, two complete sets of the Bartok 
Quartets, and all the Quartets of Arnold Schoenberg, 
as well as a large variety of works from Mozart to 
present day composers. 

The All-Beethoven program will include the Quarter 
in F Major, Op. 14, No. 1 (transcribed by the com- 
poser from the piano sonata Op. 14, No. 1 in E Major) 
( 1802): Quartet in C Major, Op. 18. No. 4 (1800); and 
Quartet in C Sharp Minor, Op. 131 (1826). 



SENIOR ORGAN RECITAL 
BY ALLEN DEAN 

The Senior Organ Recital previously scheduled for 
Monday, February 25, to be given by Allen Dean has 
been rescheduled for Sunday evening, February 24, at 
8:15 p.m. in Duke Chapel. 

Allen Dean, a senior from Amherst, Massachusetts, 
is an organ student at Duke University studying with 
Robert Parkins. He is majoring in both psychology and 
music. Dean studied piano for several years, including 
a year and a half at Duke before switching to organ. He 
is a recipient of an A. J. Fletcher Award and an Alyse 
Smith Cooper Scholarship. His future plans are to 
work with an organ building company after graduating 
from Duke. 

The recital on the Flentrop Organ, 1976, sponsored 
by the Department of Music, is open to the public 
without charge. 

Prelude and Fugue in C Georg Bohm 

Pieces from Messe pour les Paroisses Francois Couperin 

Plein chant du premier Kyrie, en Taille 

Fugue sur les jeux d'anches 

Benedictus: Chromhorne en Taille 

Offertoire sur les Grands Jeux 
Pieces for Flute — Clock Joseph Haydn 

Allegro ma non troppo (1793). H. XIX. 15 

Allegretto (1793), H. XIX. 27 

Presto (1792). H. XIX. 24 
Sonata I (1937) Paul Hindemith 

I Massig schnell — Lebhaft 

II Sehr langsam — Phantasie. frei — Ruhig bewegt 
Prelude and Fugue in D (BWV 532) Johann Sebastian Bach 

AMERICAN DANCE FESTIVAL 

The American Dance Festival, which is now cele- 
brating its third year in North Carolina, will be held 
this summer from June 16th to July 26th. 

The Festival received a $10,000 matching grant from 
Liggett Group, which was reaffirmed Saturday, Feb- 
ruary 2nd, by Robert H. Fasick, Vice President of 
Liggett Group, Inc., at the membership meeting in the 
Morehead Building, Chapel Hill. 

A condition of the grant is that it be matched by 
contributions to the American Dance Festival or the 
Association for the American Dance Festival of $25 or 
more from individuals and $75 or more from small 
businesses. 

" Liggett' s generosity will greatly assist us in ful- 
filling our plans for the 1980 Festival," said ADF Di- 
rector Charles Reinhart. " Since our programming has 
multiplied five-fold in the past ten years, the money 
will cover some of the costs that naturally develop in 
any growing organization." 

In addition to its six weeks of performances by 
Americas top dance companies, and the Festival's 
school, which provides classes in every form of 
American dance to over 250 students from the U. S. 
and other countries, ADF offers a host of special 
dance-related activities including a Dance-Television 
Workshop, Television Project for Choreographers, 
Dance Critics' Conference, and Choreographers and 
Composers Workshop for Young Professionals. 



STUDENT SPEAKER 
AT COMMENCEMENT, 1980 

A subcommittee of the University Commencement 
Committee will consider applicants during February 
and March for nomination for a student speaker at the 
May, 1980 Commencement. Any student who will re- 
ceive a baccalaureate or an advanced degree in May, 
1980, is eligible to apply. 

Those wishing to be considered should file a 
suggested title and a statement or outline of their 
speech by Monday, February 18th, in 116 Allen 
Building, with Mrs. Sandra Tuthill. 

Students will be interviewed beginning on, or about, 
March 3rd. Students will be expected to present their 
proposed speeches in final form at the interview; 
speeches will be taped for consideration by members 
of the Commencement Committee. Each speech 
should be 7 minutes or less in length. 

Nominations will be based upon the appropriateness 
of the message and the effectiveness of the delivery. 

Further information is available from Dean Paul B. 
Harrison, in Room 1 16 Allen Building or call 684-6221. 

THE ANNE FLEXNER MEMORIAL AWARD 
FOR CREATIVE WRITING 

The Anne Flexner Memorial Award is offered annu- 
ally for the best piece of creative writing submitted by 
an undergraduate student at Duke University. 



First Prize 
Second Prize 
Third Prize 



$200.00 
$100.00 
$ 50.00 



CONDITIONS 

1. The prize is open to all undergraduates, both men 
and women. 

2. Only short stories (7500-word limit), one-act plays 
(7500-word limit), and poetry (200-line limit) are 
eligible. 

3. Only one manuscript may be submitted by any 
contestant. 

4. All manuscripts must be typed double spaced and 
must be delivered to the English Office (325 Allen 
Building) by 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 March. 
The author's name and address must appear 
nowhere except on a separate sheet placed before 
the manuscript. 

DUKE HOMESITES— HOUSES FOR SALE 

Only those homes located on lots originally de- 
veloped and sold by the University and which are still 
owned by a member of the faculty or staff of the Uni- 
versity will be listed in the University Calendar. Call 
Fred E. Miller at extension 2054 for information re- 
garding listings. Call the appropriate number listed 
below for information regarding a particular house. 
Location: 15 Scott Place 
Phone: 489-8316 



Number of Bedrooms: Five (5) 
Number of Baths: 2Vz 
Type of heating/air conditioning: 
Heat pump/Central Air. 

PEER COUNSELING 

Guidance offered in the areas of decision making, 
career planning, individual goal setting, re-entering 
school and returning to work. A library is maintained 
in the center with excellent references on careers, job 
hunting skills and other pertinent areas of interest. 
Co-ordinator, librarian and counselors from a variety 
of backgrounds and experiences are available to assist 
in all of the above areas. Support and confidence are 
assured in an informal atmosphere. Call or write: 684- 
6259 Peer Counseling Center. Department of Con- 
tinuing Education, 107 Bivins Building, Durham, N. C. 
27708. 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Ms. Velma Gibson Walts for the Ph.D. 
degree in Education was held on Thursday. February 7th. The sub- 
ject of Ms. Watts' dissertation was Judicial Reactions to Teacher 
Immorality.'' The committee conducting the examination consisted 
of Professors Robert A. Pittillo. presiding, Anne Adams, William H. 
Cartwright, and Richard H. Leach. 



The final examination of Mr. David Charles Estes for the PhD 
degree in English was held on Monday, February 1 1th. The subject 
of Mr. Estes' dissertation was "Thomas Bangs Thorpe's Sketches of 
the Old Southwest: A Critical Edition.'' The committee conducting 
the examination consisted of Professors Louis Budd. presiding. Carl 
Anderson. Buford Jones, Holger Nygard. and Kenny Williams. 



The final examination of Mr. Steven Crain for the Ph.D. degree in 
Psychology was held on Monday, February 1 Ith. The subject of Mr. 
Crain's dissertation was "A Model of Roles and Attributions in 
Sexual Interactions." The committee conducting the examination 
consisted of Professors Susan Roth, presiding. Robert Carson. 
Philip Costanzo. Alan Levy, and John McConahay. 






DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham. North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 







calendar: 




Feb. 24-Mar. 2, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published February 22. 1980 



Number 20 



Sunday, February 24 

Through February 27th. DUU Galleries Committee Presents Wood- 
cuts by Joan Poole Holbrook. West Campus Gallery. 
January 26th-February 29th. D. U. U. Galleries Exhibit: Works by 

Margia Kramer. East Gallery. East Campus Library. 
January 28th-February 29th Canadian Art Exhibit: "TIME TO 

DRAW" East Campus Art Museum. 
9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Richard Lischer, Asst. Profes- 
sor of Homiletics. Duke Divinity School. The Service of 
Worship is Broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center, 505 Alex- 
ander. A light supper is served following. the service. 
7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "SAME TIME. NEXT 
YEAR". Couple nurture once-a-year extramarital affair for 
26 years. Dir.: Robert Mulligan. Stars: Ellen Burstyn and 
Alan Alda. PG. Page. $1.50. 
8:15 p.m. Senior Organ Recital bv Allen Dean. Duke Chapel. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "RING ROUNDTHE MOON." Branson 
Theatre. Tickets available at Page, $4, $3, & all Thursday 
seats $2.50. 

Monday, February 25 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Department of Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

Alfred S. Lewin. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
3:00 p.m. Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs Colloquia. 

Speaker: Dr. Robert Nathans. Rm. 204 Perkins Library. 
4:15 p.m. Department of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Knut 

Schmidt-Nielsen. Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
8:00 p.m. Religion & Public Affairs Lectures. Speaker: Yehoshua 

Arieli. Divinity Alumni Memorial Common Rm. 
8:00 p.m. Philosophy Department Colloquium. Speaker: Robert 

Fogelin. Rm. 204 West Duke Bldg. 

Tuesday, February 26 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 

the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
4:00 p.m. Pharmacology Student Seminar. Speaker: Michelle 

Kloss. Rm. 408 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
4:00 p.m. Council on Aging and Human Development Lecture 

Series. Speaker: Dr. Sandra Scarr. Rm. 1504 Gerontology 

Building, Duke Medical Center. 
4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 

the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 
5:15 p.m. Episcopal "Holy Eucharist." Duke Chapel Crypt. 
7:00 & 10:00 p.m. Freewater Films: "IKIRU (TO LIVE)." Stars 



Takashi Shimura. Miki Odagiri, Kyoko Seki. A minor 
bureaucrat, about to die of stomach cancer, realizes that he 
has never really meant anything to anybody — never really 
been alive. Universally acknowledged as Kurosawa's most 
affecting film, "Ikiru" literally salvages great hope from in- 
tractable despair. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; 
Others $1.50. 

7:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Spring Semester Speakers: A. Craig 
Phillips. Rm. 202 West Duke Bldg. 

8:15 p.m. Faculty Recital by John Ruggero, piano. EDMR. 

Wednesday, February 27 

8:00 a.m. -8:15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 

the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
9:20 a.m. Lectures Committee of the Divinity School presents 

lecture by Professor Stanley Hauerwas in York Chapel. 
10:00 a.m. Duke University Campus Club Lecture Series. Speaker: 

Prof. Bruce R. Kuniholm. EDMR. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 

the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 
7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services Program Performing Arts 

Series: Nan Hoffman, folk music. Main Lobby, Hospital. 

Free. 
8:00 a.m. "Holy Eucharist" Episcopal, Memorial Chapel, Duke 

Chapel. 
8:15 p.m. Round Table on Science & Public Affairs Lecture. 

Speaker: Dr. Frank Press. Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. 
8:15 p.m. BSA presents DANCE BLACK in Spring Recital. Page. 

$2.00 all. 
8:15 p.m. The Comparative Literature Program: Professor Rene 

Girard. Topic: "Comedies of Errors: Plautus-Shakespeare- 

Moliere." EDMR. Reception afterwards. 

Thursday, February 28 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
11:30 a.m.- 11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 
Community. York Chapel. 

12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

1:00. 3:00, 7:00, & 9:00 p.m. BASKETBALL: ACC TOURNA- 
MENT. 

1:30 p.m. Duke Institute For Learning In Retirement presents a 
talk by Pat Sprunt on Andrew Wyeth. Campus Center, East 
Campus. 

4:00 p.m. The Comparative Literature Program: Prof. Rene 
Girard. Topic: "Mimesis and Violence in Three Plays of 
Shakespeare." Play under discussion: "Troilus and Cres- 
sida." Trustee's Board Rm. 201 Allen Bldg. Open to public. 

4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Memorial Chapel, Duke 
Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "THE STRANGER." Stars 
Welles. Edward G. Robinson. Loretta Young. Fascinating 
psychological study of escaped Nazi war criminal Welles liv- 
ing in a small New England town. Robinson is the federal 



agent out to get him. Plus: "HEARTS OF AGE". Welles- 
first film, made at age 19. Silent. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads 
w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 

8:00 p.m. The Comparative Literature Program: Panel discussion 
on "The Wardropper Report and the Role of the Humanities 
in Liberal Education." Panelists: Prof. Ernestine Friedl; 
Prof. Bruce Wardropper: Prof. Donald Fluke: Prof. John 
Oates: and Prof. Rene Girard. Perkins Library. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "RING ROUND THE MOON". Branson 
Theatre. Tickets available at Page. $4, $3. and all Thursday 
seats $2.50. 

Friday, February 29 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:00 Noon Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 

011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: John Baynes. 

Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: George Riechers. Rm. 
144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

1:00 p.m. Department of Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Paul 
Adams. Rm. 385 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

1:00 p.m. WRESTLING: ACC TOURNAMENT. Duke. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Department Seminar. Speaker: Dr. H. L. 
Pardue. Rm. 103 Gross Chem. Lab. 

4:00 p.m. The Comparative Literature Program: Second Shake- 
speare Seminar by Prof. Rene Girard. Topic: "The Merchant 
of Venice." Breedlove Seminar Rm., 204 Perkins Library. 
Reception in Rare Book Rm. following Seminar. 

7:00 & 10:00 p.m. Freewater Films: "8Vi". Dir.: Federico Fellini. 
Stars Marcello Mastrioanni, Claudia Cardinale, Anouk 
Aimee. "8Vi" represents Fellini's self-analysis, mixing fan- 
tasy with reality. Mastroianni plays a film director beset by 
doubts and confronted by pressures caused by the women in 
his life, the distraught film company, and images from his 
past. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "RING ROUND THE MOON". Branson 
Theatre. Tickets available at Page, $4. $3. and all Thursday 
seats $2.50. 

8:15 p.m. Senior Recital by Robert Boltuch, violin. EDMR. 

8:30 p.m. BASKETBALL' ACC TOURNAMENT. 

Saturday, March 1 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "ALIEN". Dir. Ridley 
Scott. Stars Sigourney and Tom Skerritt. (R) Slick, sci-fi hor- 
ror pitting woman astronaut in showdown with strange crea- 
ture from another planet. Formula story, but lots of special 
effects. Page. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "RING ROUND THE MOON." Branson 
Theatre. Tickets available at Page, $4, $3. and all Thursday 
seats $2.50. 

Sunday, March 2 

March 2nd-April 3rd. D. U. U. Galleries Exhibit: Works by Betty 

Oliver. East Gallery. East Campus Library. 
9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Right Reverend Paul Moore, Bishop. Epis- 
copal Diocese of New York. New York City. New York. The 
Service of Worship is Broadcast over WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30-2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room. West Campus Union. 
Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine Service 
available after 1:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 
3:00-5:00 p.m. D. U. U. Galleries Committee: Opening reception 



for artist. Betty Oliver. East Gallery, East Campus Library. 

4:00 p.m. Junior Recital by Dan Via, contra bass and Mark Parta, 
piano. Rehearsal Hall— MD Biddle Bldg. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center. 505 Alex- 
ander. A light supper is served following the service. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "ALIEN". Dir. Ridley 
Scott. Stars Sigourney and Tom Skerritt. (R) Slick, sci-fi hor- 
ror pitting woman astronaut in showdown with strange crea- 
ture from another planet. Formula story but lots of special 
effects. Page. $1.50. 

7:00 p.m. Arts in Duke Chapel Presents Organ Recital by Grigg 
Fountain. Duke Chapel. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "RING ROUND THE MOON". Branson 
Theatre. Tickets available at Page, $4, $3, and all Thursday 
seats $2.50. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for S3. 50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station. 
Durham. NC 27706: telephone 684-5578. 

Deadline for the Calendar of March 2nd-March 
16th is Monday, February 25th, before 1:00 p.m. 
Please note these dates include the week of Spring 
Recess. March 9th-16th. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION 

GALLERIES COMMITTEE PRESENTS 

WOODCUTS BY JOAN POOLE HOLBROOK 

The Duke University Union Galleries Committee is 
exhibiting color reduction woodcuts by Joan Poole 
Holbrook in the West Campus Gallery until February 
27th. Ms. Holbrook works in Chapel Hill and has ex- 
hibited her woodcuts extensively throughout North 
Carolina. Landscape, primarily in pastel shades, is a 
dominant subject for her works. The public is invited. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION GALLERIES 
EXHIBIT WORKS BY MARGIA KRAMER 

The Duke University Union Galleries presents New 
York artist Margia Kramer exhibiting her art work 



from the 70s in the East Gallery. East Campus Li- 
brary January 26th-February 29th. Ms. Kramer is a 
visiting Assistant Professor of painting and drawing at 
Duke this semester. The public is cordially invited. 

SENIOR ORGAN RECITAL 
BY ALLEN DEAN 

The Senior Organ Recital previously scheduled for 
Monday, February 25, to be given by Allen Dean has 
been rescheduled for Sunday evening, February 24, at 
8:15 p.m. in Duke Chapel. 

Allen Dean, a senior from Amherst, Massachusetts, 
is an organ student at Duke University studying with 
Robert Parkins. He is majoring in both psychology and 
music. Dean studied piano for several years, including 
a year and a half at Duke before switching to organ. He 
is a recipient of an A. J. Fletcher Award and an Alyse 
Smith Cooper Scholarship. His future plans are to 
work with an organ building company after graduating 
from Duke. 

The recital on the Flentrop Organ, 1976, sponsored 
by the Department of Music, is open to the public 
without charge. 

Prelude and Fugue in C Georg Bohm 

Pieces from Messe pour les Paroisses Francois Couperin 

Joseph Haydn 
Paul Hindemith 



Pieces for Flute — Clock 



Sonata 1 (1937) 

I Massig schnell — Lebhaft 

II Sehr langsam — Phantasie. frei — Ruhig bewegt 
Prelude and Fugue in D (BWV 532) Johann Sebastian Bach 



DUKE PLAYERS PRESENT 
RING ROUND THE MOON 

The Duke Players continue their 50th season with a 
production of the classic comedy Ring Round the 
Moon by Jean Anouilh. Eight performances are 
scheduled for February 21st-24th and February 28th- 
March 2nd at 8:15 p.m. each evening in Branson 
Theatre. 

Set in the winter-garden of an elegant French 
chateau in the 1930s, the production will feature sce- 
nery and costumes by resident designers Ron Regier 
and Doreen Wetzel. The cast of twelve Duke students 
is under the direction of Richard Aumiller, who di- 
rected the Players' Fall production of As You Like It. 

The intricate farce plot revolves around twin 
brothers and the attempt by one to disrupt the mis- 
guided marriage plans of the other. At a ball held to 
announce the engagement, the eccentric guests and 
their hostess, the twins' dowager aunt, become in- 
volved, one by one, in the ever-more-complicated 
plot. 

Tickets are on sale now at Page Box Office. Center 
Section seats are S4.00. Side Section seats are $3.00, 
and all Thursday seats are $2.50. Tickets can also be 
purchased using Mastercharge or Visa by phoning 
684-3227 between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 



p.m. weekdays. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

Dr. Alfred S. Lewin, Biozentrum. University of 
Basel. Basel. Switzerland, will speak on 'Import Of 
Cytoplasmically Made Proteins Into Mitochondria" 
for the Department of Biochemistry Seminar on Mon- 
day, February 25th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 
Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee will be served at 
12:15 p.m. in the lobby. 

INSTITUTE OF POLICY SCIENCES 
AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS COLLOQUIA 

"Energy and other Crises in Developing Countries" 
will be the subject of talk given by Dr. Robert 
Nathans, Director, Institute for Energy Research, 
State University of New York at Stony Brook on 
Monday, February 25th. at 3:00 p.m. in Room 204 
Perkins Library. Dr. Nathans will speak as part of the 
Duke Colloquia on Comparative Policymaking spon- 
sored by the Institute of Policy Sciences and Public 
Affairs. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Knut Schmidt-Nielsen. Department of Zoology, 
will speak on "Deserts Unused: What Future? Animal 
and Man in a Fragile Environment" for the Depart- 
ment of Zoology Seminar on Monday, February 25th, 
at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 of the Biological Sciences 
Building. Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

RELIGION AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURES 

The Department of Religion is sponsoring the third 
lecture in a series of Conversations with National 
Humanities Scholars on "Religion and Public Affairs: 
Historical and Contemporary Perspectives," to be 
held in the Duke Divinity Alumni Memorial Common 
Room, at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 25th. 
Yehoshua Arieli will speak on "Two Interpretations of 
American Nationality: Enlightenment and Clergy." 

Professor Arieli holds the chair of Modern History 
at Hebrew University in Jerusalem. A popular political 
commentator and cultural critic in Israel, Professor 
Arieli is best known in this country for his book Indi- 
vidualism and Nationalism in American Ideology. 

PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT COLLOQUIUM 

Robert Fogelin, Professor of Philosophy at Yale 
University, will read a paper entitled "The Tendency 
of Hume's Scepticism" for the Philosophy Depart- 
ment Colloquium on Monday, February 25th, at 8:00 
p.m. in Room 204 West Duke Building. 

PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Michelle Kloss will speak on "The LDL Pathway 
and its Role in Maintaining Cellular Cholesterol Bal- 
ance" for the Department of Pharmacology Student 



Seminar on Tuesday, February 26th at 4:00 p.m. in 
Room 408 Nanaline H. Duke Building. 

COUNCIL ON AGING AND 
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT LECTURE SERIES 

Dr. Sandra Scarr, Department of Psychology, Yale 
University, will speak on "Genetic Differences in In- 
telligence, Aptitude and Achievement," for the Duke 
University Council on Aging and Human Development 
Seminar Series, on Tuesday, February 26th at 4:00 
p.m. in Room 1504 Gerontology Building, Duke Medi- 
cal Center. The lecture is open to the public. 

KAPPA DELTA PI 
SPRING SEMESTER SPEAKERS 

State Superintendent A. Craig Phillips' topic will be 
"North Carolina's Educational Priorities" for the 
Kappa Delta Pi Spring Semester Speakers on Tuesday, 
February 26th, at 7:30 p.m. in Room 202 of the West 
Duke Building. 

FACULTY RECITAL 
JOHN RUGGERO, PIANO 

Chaconne by Bach-Busoni; Sonata in D major, K 
576 by Mozart; and Sonata in B minor. Op. 58 by 
Chopin will be performed on Tuesday, February 26th, 
at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room when the 
Duke University Department of Music presents John 
Ruggero, pianist, in recital. Admission to the recital is 
free, and the public is invited. 

John Ruggero is widely known in the area as a recit- 
alist, soloist with orchestra, and chamber musician. 
He is also a composer and has written a number of 
educational works for piano students and is presently 
working on a piano method. During the last four years, 
he has performed over 60 different chamber works, 
favorably received by audiences and the press. Along 
with the N. C. Chamber Players, he has played with 
the Ciompi Quartet, the Clarion Quintet of the N. C. 
School of the Arts, the Duke Symphony, Regina 
Mushabac, winner of the N. C. Symphony Young Ar- 
tist Competition, Edwin Grzneskowski, artist-in- 
residence at Sandhills College, and Vartan Manoogian, 
artist-in-residence at the N. C. School of the Arts. In 
addition he has acted as accompanist for the National 
Opera Company summer festivals at Duke. 

PROFESSOR STANLEY HAUERWAS 
LECTURES IN YORK CHAPEL 

The Lectures Committee of the Divinity School pre- 
sents a lecture by Professor Stanley Hauerwas, De- 
partment of Theology, University of Notre Dame, in 
York Chapel on Wednesday, February 27th, at 9:20 
a.m. The announced title of his lecture is "Abortion: 
Why the Arguments Fail." Professor Hauerwas has 
lectured widely and published extensively in the area 
of Christian Ethics. His most recent book, published 
by the University of Notre Dame Press, is Truthful- 
ness and Tragedy. The University community is cor- 



dially invited. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 
CAMPUS CLUB LECTURE SERIES 

Professor Bruce R. Kuniholm is the final speaker in 
the 1979-80 Campus Club Lecture Series. Professor 
Kuniholm's lecture, "The Middle East and U. S. Pol- 
icy" will be presented on Wednesday, February 27th, 
at 10:00 a.m. in the Music Room of East Duke Build- 
ing. The public is invited, and tickets may be pur- 
chased at the door. For further information call 489- 
6955. 

ROUND TABLE ON SCIENCE AND 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURE 

Dr. Frank Press, Director of the Office of Science 
and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the 
President, will speak on "Science and Technology 
Policy in the Carter Administration" on Wednesday, 
February 27th, at 8:15 p.m. in the Gross Chemical 
Laboratory Auditorium. Dr. John C. McKinney, Vice 
Provost and Dean of the Graduate School, will pre- 
side. The lecture is sponsored by the Round Table on 
Science and Public Affairs, and the public is cordially 
invited to attend. 

BSA PRESENTS DANCE BLACK 
IN SPRING RECITAL 

Dance Black's Spring Concert — a celebration of 
black music and dance will be held Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 27th, at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Spiritual, 
jazz and modern expressions of feeling through dance 
will be performed. Tickets are available at the Page 
Box Office for $2.00 all. 

Dance Black's Cast: Avis Alexander, Marvin 
Brown, Melanie Davis, Dawn Frisby, Reggie Gordon, 
Sharon Madison, Phyllis Moore, Will Norris, Royce 
Paige, Bryan Shepherd, Gena Taylor and Cindi Wood. 

THE PROGRAM IN 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE PRESENTS 

AN EXTENDED VISIT 

BY PROFESSOR RENE GIRARD 

Rene Girard, who was briefly a faculty member at 
Duke in the 1950's is now James M. Beall Professor of 
French and Humanities at the Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. One purpose of his visit, to stimulate thinking 
about the problems and prospects facing the 
humanities in general, is inspired by the interdiscipli- 
nary scope of Professor Girard's own career. From a 
scholarly base in French literature and the study of the 
novel, Professor Girard has developed a theory of 
human, social and cultural mechanisms that has impli- 
cations for anthropology, psychology, and religious 
thinking. His most famous book, Violence and the 
Sacred, is readily available in paperback, as is his first 
book, Deceit, Desire and the Novel; his most recent 
collection of essays is entitled To Double Business 
Bound. Professor Girard will give two public lectures, 



on February 27th and March 3rd, and a series of three 
seminars based on Shakespeare plays, on February 
28th and 29th and March 3rd. All events are open to 
the general public; most will be followed by recep- 
tions. 
The program follows: 

Wednesday, February 27th, 8:15 p.m., East Duke 
Music Room: The Comparative Literature Program 
presents Professor Rene Girard (Johns Hopkins) 
lecturing on "Comedies of Errors: Plautus- 
Shakespeare-Moliere." Reception afterwards. 

Thursday, February 28th, 4 p.m.. Trustee's Board 
Room, 201 Allen Building. The Comparative Litera- 
ture Program presents Professor Rene Girard in the 
first of a series of seminars on "Mimesis and Violence 
in Three Plays of Shakespeare." The play under dis- 
cussion is "Troilus and Cressida;" the seminars are 
open to the public. 

Thursday, February 28th, 8 p.m., Perkins Library. 
Panel discussion on "The Wardropper Report and the 
Role of the Humanities in Liberal Education." 
Panelists: Professor Ernestine Friedl, Dean of Arts 
and Sciences; Professor Bruce Wardropper (Romance 
Languages); Professor Donald Fluke (Zoology); Pro- 
fessor John Oates (Classics); Professor Rene Girard, 
visiting from Johns Hopkins. 

Friday, February 29th, 4 p.m., Breedlove Seminar 
Room, 204 Perkins Library. Second Shakespeare 
seminar by Professor Rene Girard: "The Merchant of 
Venice." Chancellor Pye will host a reception in the 
Rare Book Room for Professor Girard following the 
seminar. 

Monday, March 3rd, 4 p.m., Breedlove Seminar 
Room, 204 Perkins Library. Third Shakespeare semi- 
nar by Professor Rene Girard: "Hamlet." 

Monday, March 3rd, 8:15 p.m. East Duke Music 
Room. The Comparative Literature Program presents 
Professor Rene Girard (Johns Hopkins) lecturing on: 
"Mythology and Historical Persecution: The Case 
Against Plural and Ambiguous Interpretation." Re- 
ception afterwards. 

DUKE INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING 
IN RETIREMENT 

Andrew Wyeth, the artist and his work, will be pre- 
sented in talk and film by Pat Sprunt of Raleigh for the 
Duke Institute For Learning In Retirement on Thurs- 
day, February 28th, at 1:30 p.m. at the Campus Center 
on the East Campus. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

John Baynes, Department of Chemistry, University 
of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, will 
speak on "The Role Of Carbohydrates On Immuno- 
globulins In Clearance Of Immune Complexes From 
The Circulation" for the Department of Biochemistry 
Seminar on Friday, February 29th, at 12:30 p.m. in 
Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee will be 
served at 12:15 p.m. in the lobby. 



PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

George Riechers, Graduate Student, Department of 
Botany, will speak on "Growth of C-3 and C-4 Grasses 
Under C0 2 Enrichment" for the Plant Ecology Semi- 
nar on Friday, February 29th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 
144 Biological Sciences Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Paul Adams, Department of Physiology, University 
of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, will 
speak on "Voltage Clamp Analysis of Slow Synaptic 
Excitation in Sympathetic Ganglion Cells" for the De- 
partment of Pharmacology Seminar on Friday, Feb- 
ruary 29th, at 1:00 p.m. in Room 385 Nanaline H. 
Duke Building. Coffee will be served at 12:45 p.m. 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. H. L. Pardue from Purdue University will pre- 
sent a seminar entitled "Evaluation of Imaging De- 
tectors for Analytical Spectroscopy" on Friday, Feb- 
ruary 29th, at 3:30 p.m., in Room 103 Gross Chemical 
Laboratory. Refreshments will be served in the Lobby 
at 3:10 p.m. 

SENIOR RECITAL BY 
ROBERT BOLTUCH, VIOLINIST 

Robert Boltuch, a Music and Philosophy major, will 
give his senior violin recital on Friday, February 29th, 
at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. He will be 
assisted by pianist, Thomas Maroon. The public is in- 
vited to this recital for which there is no admission 
charge. 

The recital will include the Sonata III in Dfor Violin 
by Jean Marie Leclair; La Fontana Malata by Renzo 
Rossellini; Violin Solo from "The Violin Maker of 
Cremona" by Karl Hubay; and Sonatina I, Op. 137 
No. 1 by Franz Schubert. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION 
GALLERIES COMMITTEE 

New York artist, Betty Oliver will exhibit her 
sculpture in the East Gallery, East Campus Library, 
March 2nd-April 3rd. An opening reception for Ms. 
Oliver will be held Sunday afternoon, March 2nd, 
3:00-5:00 p.m. All are invited to attend. 

JUNIOR RECITAL BY 
DAN VIA, CONTRABASSIST 

Dan Via, a Music and Religion major, will give his 
junior contrabass recital on Sunday, March 2nd at 4:00 
p.m. in the Rehearsal Hall of the Mary Duke Biddle 
Music Building on the East Campus. He will be as- 
sisted by pianist, Mark Parta. The public is invited to 
this recital for which there is no admission charge. 

The program will include the Sonata #2 in F Major 
by A. Vivaldi; 4 Movements from Cello Suite #3 by 
J. S. Bach; Chanson Triste by S. Koussevitsky; Valse 
Miniature by S. Koussevitsky; and Sonata in D Major 



by G. P. Telemann. 

ARTS IN DUKE CHAPEL PRESENTS 
ORGAN RECITAL BY GRIGG FOUNTAIN 

The Arts in Duke Chapel presents a recital by Grigg 
Fountain, organist, on the Benjamin N. Duke Memo- 
rial Organ. Flentrop 1976, assisted by members of the 
Collegium Musicum in Duke University Chapel on 
Sunday, March 2nd, at 7:00 p.m. The recital series on 
the Benjamin N. Duke Memorial Organ is made possi- 
ble through the generous support of the Mary Duke 
Biddle Foundation, the Friends of the Chapel, the 
James T. Cleland Endowment Fund for the Duke 
Chapel, and the Marvin B. and Elvira Lowe Smith 
Memorial Fund, established by their daughter, Alyse 
Smith Cooper. 

Grigg Fountain is Professor of Music and University 
Organist at Northwestern University. 

The program follows: 
Sonate I Paul Hindemith 

Massig Schnell 

Sehr langsam — Phantasie. frei — Ruhig bewegt 
Magnificat Quinti Toni Samuel Scheldt 

(the Verses will be sung and played alternately) 
Praeludium in D (BuxWV 139) Dietrich Buxtehude 

Three Chorales Alan Stout 

(Each Chorale will be preceded by a sung stanza) 

Nun ruhen alle Walder 

Aus tiefer Noth schrei' ich zu dir 

Herzlich thut mich verlangen 

Prelude and Fugue in 
E flat major (BWV 552) Johann Sebastian Bach 

STUDENT BOOK COLLECTION CONTEST 

The Friends of Duke University Library and the 
Gothic Book Shop are jointly sponsoring a Student 
Book Collection Contest for graduates and under- 
graduates. 

The Undergraduate category has the offering of 

three prizes awarded in the form of books to be 

selected by the winners from the Gothic Book Shop: 

First Prize $100 

Second Prize 60 

Third Prize 40 

The Graduate category offers two prizes which are 
awarded in the form of books to be selected by the 
winners from the Gothic Book Shop: 

First Prize $ 60 

Second Prize 40 

The rules of the contest apply to each category. 
RULES 

1. The contest is open to all students enrolled at Duke. 

2. The books must be owned by the entrant and must have been 
collected by him. 

3. Each entrant will submit a bibliography of his collection, along 
with ten books which are representative of his collection, to the 
Rare Book Room, William R. Perkins Library, by the closing 
date, Monday, March 3, 1980. 

4. Each collection will be judged by the extent to which its books 
represent a well-defined field of interest in which the owner has 
chosen to collect. The judges will select the winning entries on 



the basis of the entrant's knowledge of his collection, his aim in 
gathering it, and his plans for its further expansion. The size of 
the collection is not of primary importance. 

5. Each entrant will have an informal meeting with the faculty 
bookmen who will do the judging. 

6. Text books may not be submitted. Since one of the qualities of a 
collection must be durability, paperback editions are not to be 
included in the entries. 

Additional information may be obtained in the Rare 
Book Room. 

DUKE CHAPEL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA 
PRESENT BACH'S -ST. MATHEW PASSION" 

THE PASSION OF OUR LORD ACCORDING TO 
ST. MATTHEW by Johann Sebastian Bach will be 
performed in Duke Chapel on Sunday, March 30 at 
4:00 p.m. It will be presented in two sessions with an 
intermission for dinner. 

Tickets priced at S3. 00 are available at Page Box 
Office or by writing PASSION, Box 4822 Duke Sta- 
tion, Durham, NC 27706. Be sure to state the number 
of tickets desired and enclose a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope for ticket return. Please make 
checks payable to Duke University. Mail orders will 
be accepted through March 20. 

A buffet dinner will be served at intermission. Tick- 
ets for the performance and buffet are priced at $10.00 
and must be purchased in advance. 

Featured with the 180-member Duke Chapel Choir 
and 30-member orchestra will be soloists Marcia Best, 
soprano: Cynthia Donnell, alto; Michael Best, tenor: 
and Wayne Lail, bass. The role of the Evangelist will 
be sung by Joseph Blanton and Jesus will be sung by 
Donald Boothman. Instrumental soloists will include 
Margaret Johnston on viola da gamba and Michael and 
Lois Schultz on oboe d'amore. The 35-member Dur- 
ham Boys Choir will also be featured. Mr. J. Benjamin 
Smith. Director of Chapel Music, will conduct the 
performance. 

PEER COUNSELING 

Guidance offered in the areas of decision making, 
career planning, individual goal setting, re-entering 
school and returning to work. A library is maintained 
in the center with excellent references on careers, job 
hunting skills and other pertinent areas of interest. 
Co-ordinator, librarian and counselors from a variety 
of backgrounds and experiences are available to assist 
in all of the above areas. Support and confidence are 
assured in an informal atmosphere. Call or write: 684- 
6259 Peer Counseling Center, Department of Con- 
tinuing Education, 107 Bivins Building, Durham, N. C. 
27708. 

THE ANNE FLEXNER MEMORIAL AWARD 
FOR CREATIVE WRITING 

The Anne Flexner Memorial Award is offered annu- 
ally for the best piece of creative writing submitted by 
an undergraduate student at Duke University. 

First Prize $200.00 





MARCH 


CALENDAR 




SUNDAY 


MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SATURDAY 

1 

1 00 p.m. 
WRESTLING ACC 
Tournament at 
Duke Umv 

7 00S 9 00 ACC 
BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT 
Greensboro 

7 00S 9 15 pm 
Quad. Flix: 

ALIEN Page 
S1 50 

8 15 pm Duke 
Players RING 
AROUND THE 
MOON Branson 
$2 50 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


T 


8 


11 00 am Chapel 




7 00 4 10 00 pm 


7.00 & 10 00 pm. 


10 00 am Campus 


6 00 p m SPRING 




The Right Rev Paul 




Freewater Films 


Wilson House 


Club Coffee m 


BREAK BEGINS. 








SEVEN 


presents THE 


Board Room Hosp 






4 00 p m Jump, 




SAMURAI Bio 


GREATEFUL 


followed by lecture 






Recital D Via 




Sci 


DEAD' Movie. Bio. 


by Dr Roscoe R 






ccntrabass S M 




8 15 p.m. Duke 


Sci Si 


Robinson m 






Parta, pianp 




Symphony 


7 30 p.m. DUMC 












Orchestra Allan 


Cultural Services 


7 00 8 9 30pm 






MDB 




Bone, conductor. 


Program Red Oak 


Freewater Films 






7 00pm Arts. n Duke 




Boaz Sharon, 


String Band Main 


LADY FROM 






Chapel Organ 
Recital by Gngg 






Lobby Hosp Free. 


SHANGHAI 










8 15 pm Round 


(Welles). Bio. Sci. 






Fountain 






Table on So S Pub 


8 15 pm Faculty 






700S 9 15pm 






Affairs Lecture Dr 


Recital G Taylor 






Quad Fin 






W Baker 


viola. C Erdberg. 






ALIEN Page 








violin. 8 J Hawk.ns, 






St 50 








piano. EDMR 






8 15 pm Duke 














Players RING 














AROUND THE 














MOON Branson 














$2 50 














9 


io 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


11 00 a.m. Chapel 






7 30 p.m. DUMC 








Rev Robert T 
Young 






Cultural Services 
David Langham and 
Jim Cntchner 
classical guitar duo 
Mam Lobby Hosp. 








16 


IT 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


22 


11 00 a m Chapel 


8 00 am Classes 


7 00 pm Freewater 


8 15 pm Duke Artists 


7 00 S 9 30 pm 


3:30 S 7.00 p.m. 


9 00 am -4 00 pm. 


Rev Juan. la B 


Resumed 


Films RED 


Series 


Freewater Films 


Graduate English 


College Music 


Wright 


March 17th-2lst 9 00 


BEARD 


SALVATORE 


TOUCH OF EVIL 


Association Spring 


Society (Regional 


7 00 & 9 00 pm 


am -5 00 pm 1980 




ACCARDO Violin 


(Welles) Bio. So 


Symposium Place 


Meeting) WD 


Quad Fl.x RICH 


GINA BACHAUER 


Sci. 


Virtuoso $4,50 8 




TBA 


Biddle Music Bidg 


KIDS Page $1.50 


MEMORIAL PIANO 


8 15 pm Duke 


S3. 50 Page 




7 00 S 11 00 p.m. 


10 30 a m. Freewater 




MASTER CLASSES 


University Chorale 


8 15 p.m. Round 




Freewater Films 


Films LITTLE 




with Guido Agosti 


J B Smith 


Table on Sci & Pub 




THE GODFATHER, 


MISS MARKER 




MD Biddle Bidg 




Affairs Lecture D. 




PART II Bio Sci 


(Children). Gross 




3 30 p m Umv 


Center 


Rodney Nichols 










Review Committee 




Gross Chem. Lab. 






7 00 8 9.30 p.m. 




Meeting Board flm 




Aud 






Quad . Fl« DERSU 




Allen. 










UZALA, The 




8 15pm Student 










Hunter Page 




Recital. H. 










$1 50 




Butfington organ & 














F, Freed, organ 














Duke Chapel 












^-O 


24 


25 


26 


2T 


28 


29 


11 00 a m Chapel 


March 24th-28th 9 00 


7 00 8 9 30 pm 


3 00pm Institute of 


7 00* 9 30pm 


March 28th-30th 


10 00 am Tr.angle 


Student Preacher 


am -5 00 pm. 1980 


Freewater Film 


Policy Set. & Public 


Freewater Films 


Washington Duke 


Dance Guild 


4 00pm Faculty 


BACHAUER 


THE AMERICAN 


Affairs Colloquium. 


THE TRIAL 


Club Weekend 


PAULINE KONER 


Recital David 


MASTER CLASSES 


FRIEND Bio Sci 


Speaker Frank 


(Welles) Bio Sci 


7 00. 9:30 p.m. & 


Master Class Ark 


Mc Con key organ 


with Guido Agosti 


8 00 p m Aging in the 


Levy 204 Perkins. 




Midnight Freewater 


Free Open to 




MD Bidd'e Bldg 


Eighties Lecture 






Films THEY 


Pubhc 


8 30 p m D U U 


March 24th-26th 


Series Speaker 






SHOOT HORSES 


7 00 8 9 00pm 


Broadway at Duke 


Registration for fall 


George J 






DONTTHEYr b.o 


Quad Flu 


AINT 




Alexander Searle 






Set. 


BREAKING 


MISBEMAVIN 


semesters, 1980 


Center DUMC 






8 00pm Triangle 


AWAY Page 


$8 50 8 $7 50 Page 




8 15 p.m. Duke Umv 
Wind Symphony P 
Bryan conductor 8 
E Williams, guest 

conductor Page 






Dance Guild 
presents PAULINE 
KONER DANCE 
CONSORT Page 
Stud 65 $4 , Public 
$5 
8 15 p m Duke 
Players THE NEXT 
GENERATION and 


$1.50. 

815pm. Ctompi 
Quartet EDMR. 

8 15 pm Duke 
Players. THE NEXT 
GENERATION' and 

SWITCHBOARD" 
Branson $2 50 


30 


31 








SW1TCHBOARO 
Branson $2 50 




March 301h GREEK 


8 00-10 00 pm ASDU 












GAMES— Wallace 


Student 












Wade Si ad 


Symposium Gross 












1100 a m (PALM 


Chem Aud 












SUNDAY) Chapel 


8 15pm Senior 


























Armstrong 


Cheves. soprano & 












11 00 am -3 00 pm 


K Huestis piano 












ASDU Ethnic 


EDMR 












Cultural Days m 














front of Baldwin 














4 00pm Duke 














Chapel Choir & 














Orchestra with The 














Durham Boys Choir 














St Matthew 














Passion by J S 














Bach, J B Smith 














conductor Chapel 














$3 Performance 














only, $10 














performance 8 














banquet 














7004 900pm 














Quad Fiix 














BREAKING 














AWAY Page 
$1 50 














8 15 pm Duke 
Players THE NEXT 














GENERATION and 














SWITCHBOARD 














Branson $2 50 















Second Prize $100.00 

Third Prize $ 50.00 

CONDITIONS 

1. The prize is open to all undergraduates, both men 
and women. 

2. Only short stories (7500-word limit), one-act plays 
(7500- word limit), and poetry (200-line limit) are 
eligible. 

3. Only one manuscript may be submitted by any 
contestant. 

4. All manuscripts must be typed double spaced and 
must be delivered to the English Office (325 Allen 
Building) by 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 March. 
The author's name and address must appear 
nowhere except on a separate sheet placed before 
the manuscript. 

DUKE HOMESITES— HOUSES FOR SALE 

Only those homes located on lots originally de- 
veloped and sold by the University and which are still 
owned by a member of the faculty or staff of the Uni- 
versity will be listed in the University Calendar. Call 
Fred E. Miller at extension 2054 for information re- 
garding listings. Call the appropriate number listed 
below for information regarding a particular house. 

Location: 15 Scott Place 
Phone: 489-8316 
Number of Bedrooms: Five (5) 
Number of Baths: 2V2 



Type of heating/air conditioning: 
Heat pump/Central Air. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Douglas J. Nichols for the Ph.D. 
degree in Sociology was held on Wednesday, February 20th. The 
subject of Mr. Nichols' dissertation was "Migration and Fertility in 
the United States: An Examination of the Roles of Origin and Desti- 
nation on the Cumulative Fertility of American Women." The 
committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors 
George Myers, presiding, Joel Smith, Edward Tiryakian, Kurt 
Back, and Allen Kelley. 

The final examination of Mr. Steven Henry Young for the Ph.D. 
degree in Physiology was held on Thursday, February 21st. The 
subject of Mr. Young's dissertation was "Potassium Current 
Dynamics in Crayfish Giant Axon." The committee conducting the 
examination consisted of Professors John W. Moore, presiding, 
Fidel Ramon, Michael Hines, Sidney Simon, and Joseph Corless. 



The final examination of Mr. Robert Hoyt Glover for the Ph.D. 
degree in Education was held on Friday, February 22nd. The subject 
of Mr. Glover's dissertation was "A Contingency Approach to 
Planned Change in Colleges and Universities." The committee con- 
ducting the examination consisted of Professors Everett H. Hop- 
kins, presiding, Robert H. Ballantyne, Peter F. Carbone. Willis D. 
Hawley, and David V. Martin. 



The final examination of Mr. Thomas A. Beyer for the Ph.D. 
degree in Biochemistry was held on Friday, February 22. The sub- 
ject of Mr. Beyer's dissertation was "Purification and Characteriza- 
tion of the H-Blood Group Fucosyltransferase From Porcine Sub- 
maxillary Gland and Analysis of its Role in Glycoprotein Biosyn- 
thesis." The committee conducting the examination consisted of 
Professors Robert L. Hill, presiding, Bernard Kaufman, K. V. 
Rajagopalan, Robert Lefkowitz, and Robert Wheat. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR^ 




March 2-16, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published February 29, 1980 



Number 21 



Sunday, March 2 

March 2nd-April 3rd. D. U. U. Galleries Exhibit: Works by Betty 
Oliver. East Gallery, East Campus Library. 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Right Reverend Paul Moore. Bishop. Epis- 
copal Diocese of New York, New York City, New York. The 
Service of Worship is Broadcast over WDBS. 107.1 FM. 

11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: 'A price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 

11:30-2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus Union. 
Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine Service 
available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00-5:00 p.m. D. U. U. Galleries Committee: Opening reception 
for artist. Betty Oliver. East Gallery, East Campus Library. 

4:00 p.m. Junior Recital by Dan Via, contra bass and Mark Parta. 
piano. Rehearsal Hall— MD Biddle Bldg. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center, 505 Alex- 
ander. A light supper is served following the service. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "ALIEN." Dir. Ridley 
Scott. Stars Sigoumey and Tom Skerritt. (R) Slick, sci-fi hor- 
ror pitting woman astronaut in showdown with strange crea- 
ture from another planet. Formula story, but lots of special 
effects. Page. $1.50. 

7:00 p.m. Arts in Duke Chapel Presents Organ Recital by Grigg 
Fountain. Duke Chapel. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "RING ROUND THE MOON." Branson 
Theatre. Tickets available at Page, $4. $3. and all Thursday 
seats $2.50. 

Monday, March 3 

March 3rd-March 25th D. U. U. Galleries Committee: Duke's Pre- 
schoolers Art Exhibit. West Gallery, 104 Flowers Bldg. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Department Seminar. Speaker: Dr. W. Ben- 
trude. Rm. 103 Gross Chem. Lab. 

4:00 p.m. The Comparative Literature Program: Third Shake- 
speare Seminar by Prof. Rene Girard. Topic: "Hamlet." 
Breedlove Seminar Rm.. 204 Perkins Library. Open to the 
public. 

4:15 p.m. Department of Zoology seminar. Speaker: Dr. Bob Bak- 
ker. Room 111 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

7:00. 9:00, & 11:00 p.m. Association For Computing Machinery: 
"WIZARDS." Bio. Sci. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. The Comparative Literature Program: Professor Rene 
Girard. Topic: "Mythology and Historical Persecution: The 
Case against Plural and Ambiguous Interpretation." EDMR. 
Reception afterwards. Open to the public. 

Tuesday, March 4 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:10 p.m. Forest Protection Seminar. Speakers: Steve Ianniello 
and John Shannon. Rm. 202 Bio. Sci. 



12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

4:00 p.m. Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Kenneth Moore. Rm. 
147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. 

4:00 p.m. Mathematics Colloquium. Speaker: Dr. Jerrold Tunnell. 
Rm. 124 Physics Bldg. 

4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

5:15 p.m. "Episcopal Holy Eucharist." Duke Chapel Crypt. 

7:00 & 10:00 p.m. Freewater Films: "SEVEN SAMURAI." Stars 
Takashi Shimura, Toshiro Mifune. Yoshio Inaba. Peasants in 
a 16th century village hire professional warriors to fend off 
bandits. An exultant concoction of adventure, romance, ac- 
tion, humor, suspense, and colorful characters — fast paced 
and totally absorbing. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; 
Others $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra: Allan Bone, conductor and 
Boaz Sharon, piano. Page. 

Wednesday, March 5 

8:00 a.m. "Holy Eucharist Episcopal," Memorial Chapel, Duke 
Chapel. 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 
Community. York Chapel. 

12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30-1:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Spring Semester Speakers. 
Speaker: Vicki Frazier. Rm. 202 West Duke Building. 

3:30 p.m. Romance Languages Seminar. Speaker: Prof. Joseph 
Halpern. Breedlove Room. Perkins Lib. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Psychology and the Neurobiology Committee. 
Speaker: Dr. Robert A. McCrea. Rm. 273 Sands Bldg. 

4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

7:00 & 10:00 p.m. & 1 a.m. Wilson House presents "THE 
GRATEFUL DEAD" Movie. Dir. by Jerry Garcia, Leon 
Gast. The ultimate in concert films — vividly captures the 
feeling of the band, its music and the groups relationship 
with its audiences." Twenty numbers, including "True- 
kin' ". "Sugar Magnolia," and Casey Jones." Complete with 
custom Bose sound system. Bio. Sci. Aud. $1. 

7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services Program: Red Oak String 
Band, Main Lobby, Hospital. Free. 

8:00 p.m. Duke Union Major Attractions presents JOHN PRINE. 
Page Aud. 

Thursday, March 6 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 

the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:00 a.m. -12:00 Noon Round Table on Science and Public Affairs 

Coffee for Dr. William O. Baker. Members of the University 

community are invited. Commons Rm.. Rm. 331, 

Sociology-Psychology Bldg. 
10:00 a.m. Campus Club Meeting: Coffee in Board Room, Hospital 

followed by a lecture and slides in Amphitheater, Hospital. 

Speaker: Dr. Roscoe R. Robinson. Guest Day. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 



1:30 p.m. Duke Institute For Learning In Retirement. Speaker: 
Charles R. Eilber. Campus Center, East Campus. 

4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

5:15 p.m. "Holy Eucharist, Episcopal." Memorial Chapel, Duke 
Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "LADY FROM SHAN- 
GHAI." Stars Welles, Rita Hayworth, Everett Sloane. 
Welles is a naive young sailor in this bizarre murder mystery. 
The climactic hall of mirrors scene is fascinating. Bio. Sci. 
Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Faculty Recital: George Taylor, viola: Claudia Erdberg, 
violin: Jane Hawkins, piano. EDMR. 

Friday, March 7 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:00 Noon Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 

011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Holly Wagner. Rm. 

144 Bio. Sci. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Maria L. 

Bade. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
3:30 p.m. Chemistry Dept. Seminar. Speaker: Dr. T. N. Salzmann. 

Rm. 103 Gross Chem. Lab. 
6:00 p.m. SPRING BREAK BEGINS. 

Saturday, March 8 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

Sunday, March 9 

10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship University Chapel. 

Preacher: The Reverend Robert T. Young, Minister to the 

University. The Service of Worship is Broadcast over 

WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 
5:15 p.m. "Holy Eucharist, Episcopal." Episcopal Student 

Center, 505 Alexander Avenue. A light supper follows this 

service. 

Monday, March 10 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

Tuesday, March 11 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

5:15 p.m. "Holy Eucharist Episcopal," Duke Chapel Crypt. 

Wednesday, March 12 

8:00 a.m. "Holy Eucharist Episcopal." Memorial Chapel, Duke 

Chapel. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services: David Langham and Jim 

Critcher, classical guitar duo. Main Lobby, Hospital. Free. 

Thursday, March 13 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
5:15 p.m. "Holy Eucharist Episcopal," Memorial Chapel, Duke 
Chapel. 

Friday, March 14 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:00 Noon Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers ( Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 
011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 

Saturday, March 15 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of An Open Hours. 

Sunday, March 16 

10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Juanita B. Wright. The Service of 
Worship is Broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 



3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. "Holy Eucharist-Episcopal." Episcopal Student Center, 
505 Alexander Avenue. A light supper follows this service. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "RICH KIDS." Enter- 
taining, pointed, filmed-in-New York comedy about 12- 
year-olds whose innocent relationship is their buffer against 
fallout from divorce. Cast: Trini Alvarado, Jeremy Levy, 
Kathryn Walker, and John Lithgow. Dir.: Robert M. Young, 
PG. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 






Deadline for the Calendar of March 16th-March 
23rd is Monday, March 10th, before 1:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



ROUND TABLE ON SCIENCE AND 

PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURE CANCELLED 

DR. WILLIAM O. BAKER 

It has been necessary for Dr. William O. Baker, 
Chairman of the Board, Bell Telephone Laboratories, 
to cancel his Round Table on Science and Public Af- 
fairs lecture and seminar scheduled for Wednesday, 
March 5th, at 8:15 p.m. and Thursday, March 6th, 
between 10:00 a.m. -12:00 noon. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION 
GALLERIES COMMITTEE 

New York artist, Betty Oliver will exhibit her 
sculpture in the East Gallery, East Campus Library, 
March 2nd-April 3rd. An opening reception for Ms. 
Oliver will be held Sunday afternoon, March 2nd, 
3:00-5:00 p.m. All are invited to attend. 



JUNIOR RECITAL BY 
DAN VIA. CONTRABASS1ST 

Dan Via, a Music and Religion major, will give his 
junior contrabass recital on Sunday, March 2nd at 4:00 
p.m. in the Rehearsal Hall of the Mary Duke Biddle 
Music Building on the East Campus. He will be as- 
sisted by pianist, Mark Parta. The public is invited to 
this recital for which there is no admission charge. 

The program will include the Sonata #2 in F Major 
by A. Vivaldi; 4 Movements from Cello Suite #3 by 
J. S. Bach; Chanson Triste by S. Koussevitsky; Valse 
Miniature by S. Koussevitsky; and Sonata in D Major 
by G. P. Telemann. 

ARTS IN DUKE CHAPEL PRESENTS 
ORGAN RECITAL BY GRIGG FOUNTAIN 

The Arts in Duke Chapel presents a recital by Grigg 
Fountain, organist, on the Benjamin N. Duke Memo- 
rial Organ. Flentrop 1976, assisted by members of the 
Collegium Musicum in Duke University Chapel on 
Sunday, March 2nd, at 7:00 p.m. The recital series on 
the Benjamin N. Duke Memorial Organ is made possi- 
ble through the generous support of the Mary Duke 
Biddle Foundation, the Friends of the Chapel, the 
James T. Cleland Endowment Fund for the Duke 
Chapel, and the Marvin B. and Elvira Lowe Smith 
Memorial Fund, established by their daughter, Alyse 
Smith Cooper. 

Grigg Fountain is Professor of Music and University 
Organist at Northwestern University. 

The program follows: 
Sonate I Paul Hindemith 

Massig Schnell 

Sehr langsam — Phantasie. frei — Ruhig bewegt 
Magnificat Quinti Toni Samuel Scheldt 

(the Verses will be sung and played alternately) 
Praeludium in D (BuxWV 139) Dietrich Buxtehude 

Three Chorales Alan Stout 

(Each Chorale will be preceded by a sung stanza) 

Nun ruhen alle Walder 

Aus tiefer Noth schrei' ich zu dir 

Herzlich thut mich verlangen 

Prelude and Fugue in 

E flat major (BWV 552) Johann Sebastian Bach 

DUKE PLAYERS PRESENT 
RING ROUND THE MOON 

The Duke Players continue their 50th season with a 
production of the classic comedy Ring Round the 
Moon by Jean Anouilh. The last performance is 
scheduled for March 2nd at 8:15 p.m. in Branson 
Theatre. 

Set in the winter-garden of an elegant French 
chateau in the 1930s, the production will feature scen- 
ery and costumes by resident designers Ron Regier 
and Doreen Wetzel. The cast of twelve Duke students 
is under the direction of Richard Aumiller, who di- 
rected the Players' Fall production of As You Like It. 

The intricate farce plot revolves around twin 
brothers and the attempt by one to disrupt the mis- 



guided marriage plans of the other. At a ball held to 
announce the engagement, the eccentric guests and 
their hostess, the twins' dowager aunt, become in- 
volved, one by one. in the ever-more-complicated 
plot. 

Tickets are on sale now at Page Box Office. Center 
Section seats are $4.00. Side Section seats are S3. 00. 
Tickets can also be purchased using Mastercharge or 
Visa by phoning 684-3227 between the hours of 10:00 
a.m. and 3:00 p.m. weekdays. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION 
GALLERIES COMMITTEE 

Enjoy paintings, drawings, and paper mache 
sculpture created by Duke's supremely talented pre- 
schoolers March 3rd-March 25th in the West Gallery. 
104 Flowers Building. 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. W. Bentrude from the University of Utah will 
present a seminar entitled "Conformations of Phos- 
phorus Containing Ring Systems Related to Cyclic 
AMP and Cyclophosphamide"' on Monday, March 
3rd, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 103 Gross Chemical Lab- 
oratory. Refreshments will be served in the Lobby at 
3:10 p.m. 

THE PROGRAM IN 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

PRESENTS PROFESSOR RENE GIRARD 

Rene Girard, who was briefly a faculty member at 
Duke in the 1950s, is now James M. Beall Professor of 
French and Humanities at the Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. Professor Girard will conclude his visit with a 
Shakespeare Seminar "Hamlet", on Monday, March 
3rd, at 4:00 p.m. in Breedlove Seminar Room, 204 
Perkins Library, and a lecture on Monday, March 3rd, 
at 8:15 p.m. in East Duke Music Room. He is lecturing 
on "Mythology and Historical Persecution: The Case 
against Plural and Ambiguous Interpretation." There 
will be a reception afterwards. Both events are open to 
the general public. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Bob Bakker, Department of Earth and Planetary 
Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, will speak on 
"Hot and Cold Running Dinosaurs" for the Depart- 
ment of Zoology Seminar on Monday, March 3rd, at 
4:15 p.m. in Room 111 of the Biological Sciences 
Building. Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

FOREST PROTECTION SEMINARS 

The School of Forestry and Environmental Studies 
cordially invites the university community to attend 
the Forest Protection Seminar Series. Lectures are on 
Tuesdays at 12:10 p.m. in Room 202 Biological Sci- 
ences. On March 4th, Steve Ianniello will speak on the 
"Biological Studies of the Hickory Twig Girdler" and 
John Shannon will discuss "Street Tree Management 



Alternatives for Duke University Road." On March 
18th, Alfred Forstall of the Washington, D. C, office 
of the United States Forest Service engineering staff 
will describe the digital terrain information system 
used by the Forest Service. 

PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Kenneth Moore, Ph.D., Department of Pharmacol- 
ogy, Michigan State University, will speak on "Differ- 
ential Regulation of Dopamine Nerves In The Brain" 
for the Pharmacology Seminar on Tuesday, March 4th, 
at 4:00 p.m. in Room 147 in the Nanaline H. Duke 
Building. 

MATHEMATICS COLLOQUIUM 

Dr. Jerrold Tunnell of Princeton University will pre- 
sent the Mathematics Colloquium lecture on "Special 
values of Dirichlet series arising from number theory" 
to be held on Tuesday, March 4th, at 4:00 p.m. in 
Room 124 of the Physics Building. Refreshments will 
be served at 3:30 p.m. in Room 138 of the Physics 
Building. All interested persons are cordially invited to 
attend. 

DUKE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

On Tuesday evening, March 4th. the Department of 
Music will present the Duke Symphony Orchestra in 
concert at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Allan Bone 
will conduct the orchestra and the concert is open 
without charge. Featured in the program is Robert 
Ward, Duke Professor of Composition and former 
Chancellor of The North Carolina School of the Arts 
who is widely known for his Pulitzer Prize winning 
opera, "The Crucible" (1962). The first half of the 
concert will include Ward's Divertimento for Or- 
chestra (1960) which was written for the Portland 
(Oregon) Youth Symphony and its conductor, Jacob 
Avshalomov, under a grant from the Rockefeller 
Foundation and Jonathon and the Gingery Snare 
(1949). The latter work introduces Jonathon to his 
friends-to-be, the percussion instruments, and was 
written for Young Audience Concerts of The New 
York Philharmonic. It will be narrated by Mr. Ward, 
and families are especially welcome to enjoy sharing 
an unusual musical treat. 

Boaz Sharon, Duke Pianist-in-Residence, will per- 
form Ravel's Piano Concerto in G Major (1930). His 
recently issued recording of Music by Charles 
Koechlin has been favorably reviewed. His recent 
performance at the Phillips Collection in Washington, 
D. C. will be broadcast nationally. 

Milhaud's La Creation du Monde (1923) for 19 
players will also be heard. The work was inspired by 
Milhaud's having heard Harlem Jazz combos during a 
visit to New York City. It was composed a few months 
before Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES SEMINAR 

Professor Joseph Halpern of the Department of 
French at Yale University will conduct a seminar enti- 



tled "Breton's Overheated Room" on Wednesday, 
March 5th, at 3:30 p.m. in the Breedlove Room of 
Perkins Library. Mr. Halpern is the author of Critical 
Fictions: The Literary Criticism of Jean-Paul Sartre. 
All interested persons are invited to attend. 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 
AND THE NEUROBIOLOGY COMMITTEE 

Dr. Robert A. McCrea, Assistant Research Scientist 
and Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Physiology 
and Biophysics, New York University Medical 
Center, 550 First Avenue, New York, New York, will 
speak on "Morphological Substrates For Rapid Eye 
Movements and Fixation" for the Department of 
Psychology and the Neurobiology Committee on 
Wednesday, March 5th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 273 of 
the Sands Building. Coffee and cookies will be served 
at 3:45 p.m. 

KAPPA DELTA PI 
SPRING SEMESTER SPEAKERS 

Vicki Frazier's topic will be "Parents' Rights and 
School Policy" for the Kappa Delta Pi Spring Semes- 
ter Speakers on Wednesday, March 5th, from 12:30- 
1:30 p.m. in Room 202 West Duke Building. 

AN EVENING WITH JOHN PRINE 

Duke Union Major Attractions presents John Prine 
in concert on Wednesday, March 5th at 8:00 p.m. in 
Page Auditorium. This is the only area appearance of 
Prine. Prine, who hails from Chicago, has been labeled 
the greatest singer/songwriter since Bob Dylan by 
many music critics. Prine plays a soft blend of folk, 
rock, and country music. He has written such songs as 
"Dear Abby," "Angel from Montgomery," "Illegal 
Smile," and "Hello In There." His most recent album 
was acclaimed by critics and won a place in Time 
Magazine's Top Ten Albums of 1979. 

CAMPUS CLUB MEETING 

The Campus Club Meeting on Thursday, March 6th 
(Guest Day), at 10:00 a.m. will begin with coffee in the 
Board Room of Duke Hospital followed by a lecture 
and slides in the Amphitheater of the Hospital by Dr. 
Roscoe R. Robinson speaking on "Duke Hospital 
North." 

DUKE INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING 
IN RETIREMENT 

Charles R. Eilber, Director of the North Carolina 
School of Science and Mathematics, will talk about the 
school to Duke Institute For Learning In Retirement 
on Thursday, March 6th, at 1:30 p.m. at the Campus 
Center on East Campus. 

FACULTY RECITAL BY 

GEORGE TAYLOR, CLAUDIA ERDBERG, 

AND JANE HAWKINS 

The Department of Music will sponsor a faculty re- 
cital by George Taylor, violist, with Jane Hawkins, 



pianist, and Claudia Erdberg, violinist, on Thursday, 
March 6th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. 
The public is invited to this recital for which there is no 
charge. 

George Taylor is a native of New York City. His 
teachers include Burton Kaplan, Raphaiel Bronstein 
and Jamie Laredo, and he has studied chamber music 
with Joseph Gingold, Lillian Fuchs, Artur Balsam and 
members of the Budapest and Guanari Quartets. He 
has been a member of the Metropolitan Opera Or- 
chestra and The Symphony of the New World, and has 
participated in recordings and concerts with the 
Rainier Quartet. His debut recital in April, 1979, was 
given under the auspices of the New York City Hous- 
ing Authority Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Taylor is cur- 
rently a Visiting Artist Associate with the Department 
of Music. 

Assisting artists will be Claudia Erdberg, violinist 
and, like Mr. Taylor, a member of the Ciompi Quartet, 
and Jane Hawkins, pianist for the North Carolina 
Symphony Orchestra. 

The program will include Three Madrigals (for vio- 
lin & viola) by Bohuslav Martinu; Sonata in g minor 
by Henry Eccles; Sonata in f minor by Johannes 
Brahms; and Andante e Rondo Ungarese by Carl 
Maria von Weber. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Holly Wagner, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of 
Biology, University of Pennsylvania, will speak on 
"Does A Fern Frond Falling In The Woods Make A 
Noise If No One Is There To Hear It? Leaf Persistence 
In Dryopteris Ferns'" for the Plant Ecology Seminar 
on Friday, March 7th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 144 
Biological Sciences Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

Maria L. Bade, Associate Professor of Biology, 
Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, will 
speak on "Enzymic Degradation Of Chitin In The 
Molt, Or How Caterpillars Change Their Spots" for 
the Department of Biochemistry Seminar on Friday, 
March 7th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. 
Duke Building. Coffee will be served at 12:15 p.m. in 
the lobby. 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. T. N. Salzmann of Merck, Sharpe, and Dohme 
will present a seminar entitled "Selected Topic from 
Antibiotic Biochemistry" on Friday, March 7th, at 
3:30 p.m. in Room 103 Gross Chemical Laboratory. 
Refreshments will be served in the Lobby at 3: 10 p.m. 

STUDENT BOOK COLLECTION CONTEST 

The Friends of Duke University Library and the 
Gothic Book Shop are jointly sponsoring a Student 
Book Collection Contest for graduates and under- 
graduates. 

The Undergraduate category has the offering of 



three prizes awarded in the form of books to be 
selected by the winners from the Gothic Book Shop: 

First Prize $100 

Second Prize 60 

Third Prize 40 

The Graduate category offers two prizes which are 
awarded in the form of books to be selected by the 
winners from the Gothic Book Shop: 

First Prize $ 60 

Second Prize 40 

The rules of the contest apply to each category. 

RULES 

1. The contest is open to all students enrolled at Duke. 

2. The books must be owned by the entrant and must have been 
collected by him. 

3. Each entrant will submit a bibliography of his collection, along 
with ten books which are representative of his collection, to the 
Rare Book Room, William R. Perkins Library, by the closing 
date, Monday, March 3, 1980. 

4. Each collection will be judged by the extent to which its books 
represent a well-defined field of interest in which the owner has 
chosen to collect. The judges will select the winning entries on 
the basis of the entrant's knowledge of his collection, his aim in 
gathering it, and his plans for its further expansion. The size of 
the collection is not of primary importance. 

5. Each entrant will have an informal meeting with the faculty 
bookmen who will do the judging. 

6. Text books may not be submitted. Since one of the qualities of a 
collection must be durability, paperback editions are not to be 
included in the entries. 

Additional information may be obtained in the Rare 
Book Room. 

PEER COUNSELING 

Guidance offered in the areas of decision making, 
career planning, individual goal setting, re-entering 
school and returning to work. A library is maintained 
in the center with excellent references on careers, job 
hunting skills and other pertinent areas of interest. 
Co-ordinator, librarian and counselors from a variety 
of backgrounds and experiences are available to assist 
in all of the above areas. Support and confidence are 
assured in an informal atmosphere. Call or write: 684- 
6259 Peer Counseling Center, Department of Con- 
tinuing Education, 107 Bivins Building, Durham, N. C. 
27708. 

THE ANNE FLEXNER MEMORIAL AWARD 
FOR CREATIVE WRITING 

The Anne Flexner Memorial Award is offered annu- 
ally for the best piece of creative writing submitted by 
an undergraduate student at Duke University. 
First Prize $200.00 

Second Prize $100.00 

Third Prize $ 50.00 

CONDITIONS 

1. The prize is open to all undergraduates, both men 
and women. 

2. Only short stories (7500-word limit), one-act plays 
(7500-word limit), and poetry (200-line limit) are 
eligible. 



3. Only one manuscript may be submitted by any 
contestant. 

4. All manuscripts must be typed double spaced and 
must be delivered to the English Office (325 Allen 
Building) by 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 March. 
The author's name and address must appear 
nowhere except on a separate sheet placed before 
the manuscript. 

DUKE CHAPEL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA 
PRESENT BACH'S -ST. MATHEW PASSION" 

THE PASSION OF OUR LORD ACCORDING TO 
ST. MATTHEW by Johann Sebastian Bach will be 
performed in Duke Chapel on Sunday, March 30 at 
4:00 p.m. It will be presented in two sessions with an 
intermission for dinner. 

Tickets priced at $3.00 are available at Page Box 
Office or by writing PASSION, Box 4822 Duke Sta- 
tion, Durham, NC 27706. Be sure to state the number 
of tickets desired and enclose a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope for ticket return. Please make 
checks payable to Duke University. Mail orders will 
be accepted through March 20. 

A buffet dinner will be served at intermission. Tick- 
ets for the performance and buffet are priced at $10.00 
and must be purchased in advance. 

Featured with the 180-member Duke Chapel Choir 
and 30-member orchestra will be soloists Marsha An- 
drews, soprano; Cynthia Donnell, alto; Michael Best, 
tenor; and Wayne Lail, bass. The role of the 
Evangelist will be sung by Joseph Blanton and Jesus 
will be sung by Donald Boothman. Instrumental solo- 
ists will include Margaret Johnston on viola da gamba 
and Michael and Lois Schultz on oboe d'amore. The 
35-member Durham Boys Choir will also be featured. 
Mr. J. Benjamin Smith, Director of Chapel Music, will 
conduct the performance. 

ALTERNATIVE CAREERS 
FOR TEACHERS TO BE INVESTIGATED 

According to NEA Research Services, in 1978 there 
were 146,850 teaching graduates competing for only 
75,400 positions available. Additionally, it was esti- 
mated that another 118,000 former teachers were try- 
ing to return to the profession. In North Carolina the 
problem of teacher supply and demand has been much 
more severe than these figures indicate. 

The oversupply of teachers is forcing many "would 
be" teachers into examining other career options. 
Along with them are those who decide, after several 
years of classroom experience, that they wish to make 
a career change. Unfortunately, persons who find 
themselves in these situations often do not know 
where to turn for help. They find themselves either 
unemployed, underemployed, or simply "trapped" by 
circumstances. 

A one-day workshop "Alternative Careers for 
Teachers" is designed in response to these particular 
problems. The workshop, developed by Mr. Bill 



Bowman and Dr. Ronald Fairbairn, of Columbus Col- 
lege, has been presented in many locations around the 
country, receiving outstanding evaluations from par- 
ticipants. The same workshop will be offered to 
Triangle area residents on Saturday, March 29th. in 
the Gross Chemistry Auditorium on the Duke Univer- 
sity Campus. 

The program has been especially designed to be of 
help to the following groups; 

— new teachers who have not been able to locate 

teaching positions; 
— present teachers who wish to make a career 

change; 
— persons with liberal arts or general education 

backgrounds; 
— others who have college degrees but no areas of 

special or technical training. 

The workshop will provide specific resources, fac- 
tual information, and concrete examples for the benefit 
of the participants. 

Registration for the workshop on March 29th from 
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. may be completed by mailing 
name, address, phone number of participant, along 
with a check for $25.00 payable to Duke University, 
to: Marilyn Hartman, Office of Continuing Education, 
107 Bivins, Duke University, Durham, N. C. 27708. 
Details may be obtained by phoning 684-6259. 

DUKE INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING 

IN RETIREMENT 

"GREAT DECISION '80" LECTURE SERIES 

The Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement, as- 
sisted by a grant from the North Carolina Humanities 
Committee, will sponsor the "Great Decisions '80" 
Lecture Series on Tuesday afternoons, March 18-May 
13, from 4:30-6:00 p.m. in the Auditorium of the Gross 
Chemistry Building at Duke. The public is cordially 
invited to register and attend. Lectures will be fol- 
lowed by a question and answer period. 

Speakers, dates, and topics are as follows: 

March 18 

Albert Eldridge. Professor. Political Science. Duke 
The World in 1980: America's Best Options 
March 25 

Ralph Braibanti. James B. Duke Professor. Political Science. 
Duke 

The Mideast and The Gulf: U. S. Policy in Ferment 
April 1 

John E. Fobes. Deputy Director, General retired. UNESCO, now 
Associate University Scholar and Advisor on International Cor- 
poration 

United Nations at 35: Illusions and Realities 
April 8 

Jerry F. Hough. Professor, Political Science, Duke 
U. S. and Soviet Relations 
April 15 

Charles Hirschman, Associate Professor. Sociology. Duke 
Humanity on the Move: How Migration Affects U. S. 
April 22 

Arturo A. Valenzuela. Associate Professor, Political Science, 
Duke 

Brazil's Rising Power: What Weight in the World Scale? 
May 6 
Robert F. Conrad, Associate Professor, Economics, Duke 



The World Energy Crunch: America's Choices at Home and 

Abroad 

May IS 

Ole R. Holsti. G. V. Allen Professor, Political Science, Duke 

Vietnam and Its Neighbors: Big Powers and Little Wars 

Registration for the complete series of eight lectures 
is $10.00. To register, or for further information, call 
Sallie Simons, 684-6259, the Office of Continuing Edu- 
cation, Duke University. 

DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 

50TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON 

FINAL CONCERT WITH 

SALVATORE ACCARDO 

ITALIAN VIOLIN VIRTUOSO 

The 50th Anniversary Season of the Duke Artists 
Series will close with the performance of the incredible 
Italian virtuoso, Salvatore Accardo, and distinguished 
pianist, Luis Battle, on Wednesday, March 19th, at 
8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Remaining tickets at 
S4.50 and $3.50 are available at Page Box Office Mon- 
day through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. or by 
Mastercharge/Visa purchase at 684-3227 between the 
hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. 

Accounted among today's foremost instrumentalist, 
Mr. Accardo possesses a flawless technique and a 
brilliance of tone that place him with the "violin elite." 
Critics and the musical media invariably resort to 
superlatives in describing his extraordinary playing. 

Another musician of great prominence, Luis Battle, 
pianist and master teacher, will accompany Mr. Ac- 
cardo. A graduate of the Kolischer Conservatory in 
Montevideo, he pursued his studies in Paris with Yves 
Nat and in the United States with Rudolf Serkin. His 
recital schedule as soloist and in chamber music con- 
certs have taken him around the world and his re- 
cordings of the Haydn and Mozart Sonatas won the 
Critic's Prize in Montevideo. He has been a participant 
at the Marlboro Music Festival since 1956 and in 1978 



Mr. Battle moved to the United States at the invitation 
of Rudolf Serkin to serve as his co-director of the 
newly established Institute for Young Performing 
Musicians. 

The program will include Sonata No. 3, Op. 1213, E 
Flat Major by Beethoven, Partita No. 2 in D Minor by 
Bach, and Fantasia. Op. 159 by Schubert. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Ms. Joan Keller Glascock for the Ph.D. 
degree in Chemistry was held on Thursday, February 25th. The 
subject of Ms. Glascock's dissertation was "Studies Directed To- 
ward the Syntheses of the Gelsemium Alkaloids: I. Syntheses of 
Hydroxamic Acids Derived from 2-Oxindoles. II. Stereoselectivity 
in Nucleophilic Additions to 2-Oxabicyclo (2.2.2) Octan-6-One." 
The committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors 
Steven W. Baldwin, presiding. Charles K. Bradsher, Peter Jeffs. 
Pelham Wilder. Jr., and Elmer J. Rauckmann. 



The final examination of Mr. Roy Kluge Samras for the Ph.D. 
degree in Mechanical Engineering was held on Monday, February 
25th. The subject of Mr. Samras' dissertation was "The Measure- 
ment of Total Respiratory Heat Loss in Neonates." The committee 
conducting the examination consisted of Professors Charles E. 
Johnson, presiding, Charles M. Harman. Lilliam R. Blackmon. and 
Herbert A. Saltzman. 



The final examination of Ms. Susan Brooks Thistlethwaite for the 
Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on Monday, March 3rd at 1:00 
p.m. in Room 210 Divinity School. The subject of Ms. 
Thistlethwaite's dissertation is "H. Shelton Smith: Critic of the 
Theological Perspective of Progressive Religious Education, 1934- 
1950." The committee to conduct the examination consists of Pro- 
fessors Robert T. Osborn, presiding, Thomas A. Langford, Robert 
E. Cushman, William E. Poteat, and John Westerhoff. 



The final examination of Mr. Kim Boekelheide for the Ph.D. de- 
gree in Pathology will be held on Tuesday, March 4th at 2:00 p.m. in 
Room M-204 Davidson Building. The subject of Mr. Boekelheide's 
dissertation is " i -L-Glutaminyl-4-Hydroxybenzene: Tyrosinase 
Activation in In Vitro Studies." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Doyle G. Graham, presiding, 
Peter C. Burger, Peter W. Jeffs, K. V. Rajagopalan, and F. Stephen 
Vogel. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



CALENDAR 




.March 16-23, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published March 14, 1980 



Number 22 



Sunday, March 16 

March 2nd-April 3rd. D. U. U. Galleries Exhibit: Works by Betty 

Oliver. East Gallery. East Campus Library 
March 3rd-March 25th D. U. U. Galleries Committee: Duke's 
Pre-schoolers Art Exhibit. West Gallery, 104 Flowers Bldg. 
March 15-17th 8:00 a.m. MENS GOLF: Iron Duke Classic. Dur- 
ham. 
10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Juanita B. Wright. The Service of 
Worship is Broadcast over WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center, 505 Alex- 
ander. A light supper is served following the service. 
7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: 'RICH KIDS.'' Enter- 
taining, pointed. filmed-in-New York comedy about 12- 
year-olds whose innocent relationship is their buffer against 
fallout from divorce. Cast: Trini Alvarado, Jeremy Levy, 
Kathryn Walker, and John Lithgow . Dir.: Robert M. Young. 
PG. 

Monday, March 17 

8:00 a.m. Classes are resumed. 

9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. The 1980 GINA BACHAUER MEMORIAL 
PIANO MASTER CLASSES with GUIDO AGOSTI. Re- 
hearsal Hall. M. D. Biddle Music Bldg. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

2:00 p.m. WOMEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. University of Wiscon- 
sin. 

2:00 p.m. MEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. Virginia Tech. 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Southeastern Massachusetts. 

3:30 p.m. University Review Committee Meeting. Board Rm.. 
Allen Bldg. 

4:15 p.m. The Department of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
Robert Brandon. Rm. Ill Biological Sciences Bldg. 

4:15 p.m. Erasmus Club Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Richard Palmer. 
Assembly Room (226) Perkins Library. 

7:00 & 10:00 p.m. AIH Movie: "PATTON." Bio. Sci. $1.50. 

8:00 p.m. Philosophy Colloquium. Speaker: Prof. Richard Rorty. 
204 West Duke Bldg. 

8:15 p.m. STUDENT ORGAN RECITAL by Fay Freed and 
Herbert Buffington. Duke Chapel. 

Tuesday, March 18 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. The 1980 GINA BACHAUER MEMORIAL 
PIANO MASTER CLASSES with GUIDO AGOSTI. Re- 
hearsal Hall, M. D. Biddle Music Bldg. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:10 p.m. Forest Protection Seminar. Speaker: Alfred Forstall. 

Rm. 202 Bio. Sci. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics and Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

Leslie G. Hickok. Rm. 130 Biological Sciences. 
2:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Southeastern Massachusetts 
3:00 p.m. Duke Colloquia on Policy Analysis. Speaker: Steve 

Weisman. Rm. 201 Union Bldg. (Flowers Conf. Rm.) 
4:00 p.m. Department of Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 



James Davis. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Canadian Studies Spring Semester Seminar. Speaker: 
Dr. Richard A. Preston. Center for International Studies. 
2101 Campus Dr. 

4:30-6:00 p.m. Duke Institute For Learning In Retirement 
"Great Decision '80" Lecture Series. Speaker: Albert El- 
dridge. Gross Chem. Aud. 

4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

5:15 p.m. "Episcopal Holy Eucharist." Duke Chapel Crypt. 

7:00 p.m. only. Freewater Films: "RED BEARD." Stars Toshiro 
Mifune, Yuzo Kayama. Yoshio Tsuchiya. Story of a young 
intern who, under the tutelage of Red Beard, the director of a 
charity clinic, changes from a conceited technician to a 
humble man who values each of his patients as a whole 
person. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w ID Free: Others SI. 50. 

7:00 & 10:00 p.m. Phi Raps Movie: "DIRTY DOZEN." Gross 
Chem. SI. 50. 

7:30 p.m. School of Forestry and Environmental Studies: 1979-80 
Maughan Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Dr. John J. 
McKetta. Zener Aud.. 130 Soc. -Psych. Bldg. 

8:15 p.m. Duke University Chorale. J. Benjamin Smith, conduc- 
tor. Searle Center. Sealy G. Mudd Bldg. 

Wednesday, March 19 

8:00 a.m. "Holy Eucharist Episcopal." Memorial Chapel. Duke 
Chapel. 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinitv School. York Chapel. 

9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. The 1980 GINA BACHAUER MEMORIAL 
PIANO MASTER CLASSES with GUIDO AGOSTI. Re- 
hearsal Hall. M. D. Biddle Music Bldg. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30-1:30 p.m. Department of Education Spring Symposium. 
Speaker: William Bennett. Rm. 202 West Duke Bldg. 

2:00 p.m. MEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. University of Wisconsin. 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL. Duke vs. University of Massachusetts. 

4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

5:00-6:00 p.m. The Gothic Bookshop invites you to a Meet The 
Author Partv for Robert Young. The Gothic Bookshop. Page 
Bldg. 

7:00, 9:00 & 11:00 p.m. Sigma Nu. Movie: "MALTISE FAL- 
CON." Bio. Sci. $1.50. 

7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services Program: Pat Boone and Oren 
Marsh, contemporary songs and piano. Main Lobby. Hospi- 
tal. Free. 

7:45 p.m. The Archaeological Institute of America presents a 
lecture by Prof. Robert Stieglitz. Zener Aud.. Sociology- 
Psychology Bldg. West Campus. 

8:15 p.m. Round Table on Science and Public Affairs Lecture. 
Speaker: Dr. Rodney Nichols. Gross Chem. Lab. Aud. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Artists Series 50th Anniversary Season Final 
Concert with Salvatore Accardo Italian Violin Virtuoso. 
Page. S4.50& $3.50. 

Thursday, March 20 

March 20-22nd 8:00 a.m. WOMEN'S GOLF: Duke Invitational. 



Durham. 

8:00 a.m.-8:15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. The 1980 GINA BACHAUER MEMORIAL 
PIANO MASTER CLASSES with GUIDO AGOSTI. Re- 
hearsal Hall, M. D. Biddle Music Bldg. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

1:30 p.m. Duke Institute For Learning in Retirement. Speaker: 
Ronald Robinson. Campus Center, East Campus. 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. University of Massachusetts. 

4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

5:15 p.m. "Holy Eucharist, Episcopal.'" Memorial Chapel, Duke 
Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "TOUCH OF EVIL."" Not 
only a melodrama pitting narc Charlton Heston against 
corrupt cop Welles over a trumped-up murder charge in a 
seedy Mexican border town. Evil is also an incredible 
exercise in the use of offbeat camera angles and expres- 
sionistic lighting. Winner of the Cannes Grand Prize. Stars 
Charlton Heston, Janet Leigh, Welles, Marlene Dietrich. Bio. 
Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others SI. 50. 

7:00 p.m. "Who are those Episcopalians and why do they do the 
crazy things they do?" Episcopal Student Center. 505 Alex- 
ander Avenue. 

8:00 p.m. The Duke University Committee on Medieval and 
Renaissance Studies Lectures. Speakers: Prof. Robert 
Kaske. York Chapel, and Prof. D. A. Bullough, Alumni 
Commons Rm. (New Divinity 115). 

Friday, March 21 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. The 1980 GINA BACHAUER MEMORIAL 
PIANO MASTER CLASSES with GUIDO AGOSTI. Re- 
hearsal Hall, M. D. Biddle Music Bldg. 
12:00 Noon Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). 

Rm. 011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Department of Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

K. V. Rajagopalan. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Ellen Sims. Rm. 144 
Biological Sciences Bldg. 

2:00 p.m. WOMEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. Virginia Tech. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Dept. Seminar. Speaker: Dr. W. Roush. Rm. 
103 Gross Chem. Lab. 

3:30 p.m. Duke Graduate English Association Spring Symposium. 
Speaker: Professor Alan Dessen. Rm. 226 Perkins Library. 

3:30 p.m. Department of Economics. Speaker: Dr. Luis Barbe. 
Rm. 213 Social Sciences Bldg. 

7:00 & 11:00 p.m. Freewater Films: "THE GODFATHER. PART 
II." Dir. by Francis Ford Coppola. Stars Al Pacino, Robert 
DeNiro. Robert Duvall. The continuing saga of the Cor- 
leones, contrasting the roots and rise of a young Don Vito 
(DeNiro) with the ascension of Michael (Pacino) as the neu 
Don. Seven Oscars, including Best Picture. Best Screenplay. 
Best Supporting Actor (DeNiro). Rated R. Bio. Sci. Duke 
Undergrads w/ID Free: Others $1.50. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Graduate English Association Spring Symposium. 
Speaker: Prof. Jerome J. McGann. Rm. 014 Perkins. 

8:15 p.m. The Department of Music presents the DUKE SYM- 
PHONY ORCHESTRA in concert. Page Aud. 

Saturday, March 22 

9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. COLLEGE MUSIC SOCIETY REGIONAL 
MEETING MID-ATLANTIC CHAPTER. Rehearsal Hall. 
MD Biddle Music Bldg. 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

10:30 a.m. Freewater Films: "LITTLE MISS MARKER'' (Chil- 
dren). B/W. Dir. by Alexander Hall. Stars Shirley Temple. 



Adolphe Menjou. Adaptation of Damon Runyon's tale of a 
little girl who reforms a bookie. Plus a Looney Tunes 
Cartoon: "Have You Got Any Castles." Gross Chem. Duke 
Undergrads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 

5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass York Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "DERSU UZALA. The 
Hunter." In Russian; Eng. titles. Visually magnificent 
ecological story set at the turn of the century. Russian army 
captain and survivor befriends Siberian trapper and their 
respective environments are contrasted. Slow, meticulous, 
and absorbing for those who enjoy being immersed in a 
special kind of film. Stars Maxim Munzuk, Yuri Solomin. 
Dir. Akira Kurosawa. Page $1.50. 

Sunday, March 23 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship University Chapel. 

Preacher: Amanda Lee Berry. Student. The Service of 

Worship is Broadcast over WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East 

Campus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and 

guests. $3.50 adults: Vi price children under 12. Wine service 

available after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30-2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room. West Campus Union. 

Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine Service 

available after 1:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
2:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Wake Forest University. 
3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 
4:00 p.m. Arts in Duke Chapel Presents Organ Recital by David 

McConkey. Duke Chapel. Open to the public. Free. 
5:15 p.m. "Holy Eucharist. Episcopal." Episcopal Student 

Center. 505 Alexander Avenue. A light supper follows this 

service. 
5:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Spring Semester Speakers Spring 

Banquet. Speaker: James J. Gallagher. University Ballroom 

West Campus. 
8:00 p.m. & 10:00 p.m. Baptist Student Union Movie: "THE 

HIDING PLACE." Bio. Sci. 
8:30 p.m. D. U. U. Performing Arts Committee Broadway at 

Duke presents "AINT MISBEHAVIN," the Tony Award 

Winning Fats Waller Musical. Page Aud. The Performance is 

Sold Out. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION 
GALLERIES COMMITTEE 

Enjoy paintings, drawings, and paper mache 
sculpture created by Duke's supremely talented pre- 
schoolers March 3rd-March 25th in the West Gallery, 
104 Flowers Building. 

UNIVERSITY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING 

The University Review Committee on the Use of 
Human subjects in Non-Medical Research will meet 
on Monday, March 17th, at 3:30 p.m. in the Board 
Room of Allen Building. All materials (copy of re- 
search proposal, completed protocol, and completed 
federal forms, if applicable) must be submitted to the 
committee secretary, Robert Sawyer. 215 Allen 
Building, by noon on the Wednesday preceding the 
regular meeting. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Robert Brandon. Department of Philosophy, 
will speak on "Fitness and Adaptedness" for the 
Department of Zoology Seminar on Monday. March 
17th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 of the Biological 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University. 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham. NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706: telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of March 23rd- March 
30 th is Monday, March 17th, before 1:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



Sciences Building. Coffee and tea will be served at 
4:00 p.m. 

ERASMUS CLUB LECTURE 

Professor Richard Palmer of the Department of 
Physics will offer some reflections on the natural 
sciences to the Erasmus Club at its meeting on March 
17th, at 4:15 p.m. in the Assembly Room (226) of 
Perkins Library. Professor Palmer's lecture entitled 
"The Scientific Method of Motorcycle Maintenance 
and the Art of Science,'" will be followed by an 
informal reception hosted by the Department of His- 
tory. Everyone is cordially invited. 

PHILOSOPHY COLLOQUIUM 

Professor Richard Rorty of Princeton University 
will read a paper entitled "Is There a Problem About 
Fictional Discourse?" for the Philosophy Colloquium 
on Monday. March 17th, at 8:00 p.m. in 204 West 
Duke Building. 

STUDENT ORGAN RECITAL 

BY FAY FREED AND 

HERBERT BUFFINGTON 

A Joint Student Organ Recital will be given by 
Herbert Buffington and Fay Freed on Monday even- 
ing, March 17th, at 8:15 p.m. in Duke Chapel. The 
public is invited to this recital for which there is no 



charge. 

The program will include Prelude and Fugue in A 
minor. BWV 543 by Johann Sebastian Bach: Two 
Chorale Preludes from the Orgelbiichlein by Johann 
Sebastian Bach: Chorale Prelude from Achtzehn 
Chorale (Leipzig) by Johann Sebastian Bach: Chorale 
in B minor by Cesar Franck: Scherzetto (from 24 
Pieces en style lihre) by Louis Vierne: and Litanies by 
Jehan Alain. 

FOREST PROTECTION SEMINAR 

Alfred Forstall of the Washington. D. C, office of 
the United States Forest Service engineering staff will 
describe the digital terrain information system used by 
the Forest Service for the Forest Protection Seminar 
Series on Tuesday. March 18th, at 12:10 p.m. in Room 
202 Biological Sciences. The university community is 
invited to attend. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS 
AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

A seminar in plant systematics and evolution will be 
held on Tuesday, March 18th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 
130 Biological Sciences. Dr. Leslie G. Hickok will 
speak on "Genetic and cytological studies in 
Ceratopteris: toward an understanding of polyploidy in 
ferns." Dr. Hickok is on the faculty of the Department 
of Botany, University of Tennessee. 

DUKE COLLOQUIA ON POLICY ANALYSIS 

Steve Weisman, White House Correspondent for 
the New York Times, will discuss "The Presidential 
Campaign — A View from the White House" on Tues- 
day, March 18th, at 3:00 p.m. in Room 201 (Flowers 
Conference Room) Union Building. Mr. Weisman's 
presentation is part of the Duke Colloquia on Policy 
Analysis sponsored by The Institute of Policy Sciences 
and Public Affairs. The public is invited. 

PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

James Davis, M.D., Department of Pharmacology, 
will speak on "Alpha- Adrenergic Receptors on Parotid 
Acinar Cells" for the Department of Pharmacology 
Seminar on Tuesday, March 18th, at 4:00 p.m. in 
Room 147 in the Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee 
will be served in the lobby at 3:45 p.m. 

THE CANADIAN STUDIES 
CENTER SEMINAR 

Dr. Richard A. Preston will speak on his study of 
"The Problems and Prospects of Expanding Canadian 
Studies in the U. S." for the Canadian Studies Center 
Seminar on Tuesday, March 18th, at 4:00 p.m. at the 
Canadian Studies Center, 2101 Campus Drive. Sherry 
will be served. 

DUKE INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING 

IN RETIREMENT 

"GREAT DECISION 80" LECTURE SERIES 

The Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement, as- 



sisted by a grant from the North Carolina Humanities 
Committee, will sponsor the "Great Decisions '80" 
Lecture Series on Tuesday afternoons, March 18-May 
13, from 4:30-6:00 p.m. in the Auditorium of the Gross 
Chemistry Building at Duke. The public is cordially 
invited to register and attend. Lectures will be fol- 
lowed by a question and answer period. 
Speakers, dates, and topics are as follows: 

March 18 

Albert Eldridge. Professor. Political Science, Duke 
The World in 1980: America's Best Options 
March 25 

Ralph Braibanti, James B. Duke Professor, Political Science, 
Duke 

The Mideast and The Gulf: U. S. Policy in Ferment 
April I 

John E. Fobes, Deputy Director, General retired, UNESCO, now 
Associate University Scholar and Advisor on International Cor- 
poration 

United Nations at 35: Illusions and Realities 
April 8 

Jerry F. Hough, Professor, Political Science, Duke 
U. S. and Soviet Relations 
April 15 

Charles Hirschman. Associate Professor. Sociology. Duke 
Humanity on the Move: How Migration Affects U. S. 
April 22 

Arturo A. Valenzuela, Associate Professor, Political Science. 
Duke 

Brazil's Rising Power: What Weight in the World Scale? 
May 6 

Robert F. Conrad, Associate Professor, Economics, Duke 
The World Energy Crunch: America's Choices at Home and 
Abroad 
May 13 

Ole R. Holsti, G. V. Allen Professor, Political Science, Duke 
Vietnam and Its Neighbors: Big Powers and Little Wars 

Registration for the complete series of eight lectures 
is $10.00. To register, or for further information, call 
Sallie Simons, 684-6259, the Office of Continuing Edu- 
cation, Duke University. 

MEET THE MAN BEHIND 
THE McKETTA LINE 

Dr. John J. McKetta, Jr., professor of chemical 
engineering at the University of Texas, predicted long 
before the current energy crisis that the nation would 
be importing 50 percent of its oil by 1980. The McKetta 
Line, an oil import projection graph, has proved to be 
an accurate indicator of U. S. energy trends. He also 
predicted that the annual inflation rate will reach 25 
percent by 1985 under current economic and energy 
policy. Hear what he has to say concerning the 
nation's energy status through the year 2000 on 
Tuesday, March 18th, at 7:30 p.m. in Zener Au- 
ditorium, 130 Soc. -Psych. Building. A reception will 
follow in the Varsity D room. Dr. McKetta's slide/ 
lecture presentation is the third in the 1979-80 
Maughan Memorial Lecture Series sponsored by the 
School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 
CHORALE SPRING CONCERT 

The Duke University Chorale, under the direction of 
Mr. J. Benjamin Smith, will perform their 1980 Spring 



Concert on Tuesday, March 18th at 8:15 p.m. In an 
effort to explore new areas for performance on the 
Duke Campus, the Carhorale has chosen the lovely 
conference room of the Searle Center in the Seeley G. 
Mudd Building as the place of their concert. 

One of the advantages to this Hall is the parking 
areas adjoining the Building. To reach these you turn 
left off Erwin Road onto Research Drive, or from the 
Duke Campus, turn left off Towerview Rd. onto 
Science Dr. 

The Chorale takes great delight in inviting the 
audience to share in their Spring Social Event as well 
as the Concert. Those who would like to join the 
Chorale for a glass of wine following the concert, are 
requested to purchase a specially marked program for 
$1.00 upon entering the concert hall. 

The program follows: 



Missa Octo Vocum 


Hassler 


Riu, riu, chiu (Spanish Carol) 


Anonymous 


Vesperae de Dominica 


Mozart 


(with string ensemble) 




Heilig 


Mendelssohn 


O wild west wind 


Elgar 


Six American Hymns in a Free Style 


Gardner 


Selections from Carnusel 


Rodgers 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
SPRING SYMPOSIUM 

William Bennett, Director, National Humanities 
Center, will speak on "Values Education Movement" 
for the Department of Education Spring Symposium 
on Wednesday, March 19th, from 12:30 p.m.-l :30 p.m. 
in Room 202, West Duke Building. 

MEET THE AUTHOR PARTY 

In celebration of Robert Young's new book, A Sprig 
of Hope, published by Abingdon Press, The Gothic 
Bookshop invites you to a party on Wednesday, 
March 19th, from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. We are located 
next to Page Auditorium on Duke University's West 
Campus, near the Chapel. 

A LECTURE BY 
PROFESSOR ROBERT STIEGLITZ 

The Archaeological Institute of America, North 
Carolina Society, presents a public lecture by Profes- 
sor Robert Stieglitz, Rutgers University, on Minoan 
Crete and Atlantis. The lecture will be held on 
Wednesday, March 19th, at 7:45 p.m., in Zener 
Auditorium, Sociology-Psychology Building on the 
West Campus. A reception follows. The public is 
invited. 

ROUND TABLE ON SCIENCE AND 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURE 

Dr. Rodney Nichols, Executive Vice President of 
the Rockefeller University, will speak on "The Inter- 
national Implications of U.S. R and D Policy" on 
Wednesday, March 19th, at 8:15 p.m. in the Gross 
Chemical Laboratory Auditorium. Dr. Harold W. 



Lewis. Vice Provost and Dean of Faculty, will preside. 
The lecture is sponsored by the Round Table on 
Science and Public Affairs, and the public is cordially 
invited to attend. 

Members of the University community are invited to 
meet Dr. Nichols and exchange views on the topic of 
the lecture at a coffee on Thursday, March 20th, 
between 10:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon in the Commons 
Room. Room 331. Sociology-Psychology Building. 

DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 

50TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON 

FINAL CONCERT WITH 

SALVATORE ACCARDO 

ITALIAN VIOLIN VIRTUOSO 

The 50th Anniversary Season of the Duke Artists 
Series will close with the performance of the incredible 
Italian virtuoso, Salvatore Accardo, and distinguished 
pianist, Luis Battle, on Wednesday, March 19th, at 
8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Remaining tickets at 
$4.50 and $3.50 are available at Page Box Office Mon- 
day through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. or by 
Mastercharge/Visa purchase at 684-3227 between the 
hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. 

Accounted among today's foremost instrumentalist. 
Mr. Accardo possesses a flawless technique and a 
brilliance of tone that place him with the "violin elite." 
Critics and the musical media invariably resort to 
superlatives in describing his extraordinary playing. 

Another musician of great prominence, Luis Battle, 
pianist and master teacher, will accompany Mr. Ac- 
cardo. A graduate of the Kolischer Conservatory in 
Montevideo, he pursued his studies in Paris with Yves 
Nat and in the United States with Rudolf Serkin. His 
recital schedule as soloist and in chamber music con- 
certs have taken him around the world and his re- 
cordings of the Haydn and Mozart Sonatas won the 
Critic's Prize in Montevideo. He has been a participant 
at the Marlboro Music Festival since 1956 and in 1978 
Mr. Battle moved to the United States at the invitation 
of Rudolf Serkin to serve as his co-director of the 
newly established Institute for Young Performing 
Musicians. 

The program will include Sonata No. 3. Op. 12/3, E 
Flat Major by Beethoven. Partita No. 2 in D Minor by 
Bach, and Fantasia. Op. 159 by Schubert. 

DUKE INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING 
IN RETIREMENT 

Ronald Robinson. Duke Divinity student, will talk 
on Cult Religions on Thursday. March 20th. at 1:30 
p.m. at the Campus Center on East Campus. 

THE DUKE UNIVERSITY COMMITTEE 

ON MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE 

STUDIES LECTURES 

The Duke University Committee on Medieval and 
Renaissance Studies is sponsoring two public lectures 
on medieval themes. On March 20th. Professor Robert 
Kaske of Cornell University will be lecturing on "The 



Seven Deadly Sins and Hroogars Sermon in 
Beowulf" and Professor D. A. Bullough of the Uni- 
versity of St. Andrews. Scotland, will speak on 
"Alcuin of York: Liturgist. Exegete. Theologian." 
Professor Kaske is an editor of Traditio and a former 
Senior Fellow of the Southeastern Institute of 
Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Professor Bul- 
lough has given the Ford Lectures at Oxford Univer- 
sity. The second lecture will be co-sponsored by the 
History Department. Both lectures will be held at 8 
p.m. Professor Kaske's lecture will be held in York 
Chapel (Gray Building) and Professor Bullough's in 
the Alumni Commons Room (New Divinity 115). 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

Dr. K. V. Rajagopalan. Department of Biochemis- 
try, will speak on "The Molybdenum Cofactor, 
Structure, Biosynthesis and Human Deficiency Disor- 
ders" for the Department of Biochemistry Seminar on 
Friday, March 21st, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 
Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee will be served at 
12:15 p.m. in the lobby. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Ellen Sims, Graduate Student, Department of 
Botany, will speak on "How To Survive In The 
Pulchritydinous Pocosins: A Look At The 
Evergreen — Deciduous Question From A Nutritional 
Perspective" for the Plant Ecology Seminar on Friday, 
March 21st, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Dr. W. Roush from the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology will present a seminar entitled "Some 
Stereochemical Aspects of the Intramolecular Diels- 
Alder Reaction" on Friday, March 21st, at 3:30 p.m. in 
Room 103 Gross Chemical Laboratory. Refreshments 
will be served in the Lobby at 3:10 p.m. 

DUKE GRADUATE ENGLISH ASSOCIATION 
SPRING SYMPOSIUM 

Professor Alan Dessen, University of North 
Carolina. Chapel Hill, will speak on "The Seen and the 
Unseen: Elizabethan Theatrical Metaphor" for the 
Duke Graduate English Association Spring Sym- 
posium in Room 226 Perkins Library on Friday. March 
21st at 3:30 p.m. 

Professor Jerome J. McGann. Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, will speak on "The Text, The Poem, And The 
Problem Of Historical Method" on Friday. March 21st 
at 7:30 p.m. in Room 014 Perkins Library. 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

The Luis Barbe. Fellow at the National Humanities 
Center from the University of Barcelona, will speak on 
"Probability Theory: A View of the Harbour" for the 
Department of Economics on Friday, March 21st, at 
3:30 p.m. in Room 213 Social Sciences Building. 



DUKE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

On Friday, March 21st, the Department of Music 
will present the Duke Symphony Orchestra in concert 
at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. This concert was 
previously scheduled for Tuesday, March 4th, at 8:15 
p.m. Allan Bone will conduct the orchestra and the 
concert is open without charge. Featured in the 
program is a work by Robert Ward, Duke Professor of 
Composition and former Chancellor of The North 
Carolina School of the Arts who is widely known for 
his Pulitzer Prize winning opera, "The Crucible" 
(1962). The first half of the concert will include Ward's 
Divertimento for Orchestra (1960) which was written 
for the Portland (Oregon) Youth Symphony and its 
conductor, Jacob Avshalomov, under a grant from the 
Rockefeller Foundation and Jonathon and the Gingery 
Snare (1949). The latter work introduces Jonathon to 
his friends-to-be, the percussion instruments, and was 
written for Young Audience Concerts of The New 
York Philharmonic. It will be narrated by Mr. Ward, 
and families are especially welcome to enjoy sharing 
an unusual musical treat. 

Boaz Sharon, Duke Pianist-in-Residence, will per- 
form Ravel's Piano Concerto in C Major (1930). His 
recently issued recording of Music by Charles 
Koechlin has been favorably reviewed. His recent 
performance at the Phillips Collection in Washington, 
D. C. will be broadcast nationally. 

Milhaud's La Creation du Monde (1923) for 19 
players will also be heard. The work was inspired by 
Milhaud's having heard Harlem Jazz combos during a 
visit to New York City. It was composed a few months 
before Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue. 

ARTS IN DUKE CHAPEL PRESENTS 
ORGAN RECITAL BY DAVID McCONKEY 

The Arts in Duke Chapel presents a recital by David 
McConkey, Associate Chapel Organist, on the Aeolian 
organ in the chapel on Sunday afternoon, March 23rd, 
at 4:00 p.m. The program will include nineteenth and 
early twentieth century pieces for Lent and Passion- 
tide from Germany, England, and France. Works to be 
heard include those of Felix Mendelssohn, Sir Charles 
Hubert Hastings Parry, Herbert Howells, Marcel 
Dupre, and Sigfrid Karg-Elert. Featured will be five 
movements of Le Chemin de la Croix by Marcel 
Dupre. This work, whose title can be literally trans- 
lated "the way of the cross," consists of musical 
representations of scenes of Christ on the walk to the 
cross, dying on the cross and being buried. The public 
is invited to this recital for which there is no admission 
charge. 

KAPPA DELTA PI 
SPRING SEMESTER SPEAKER 

James J. Gallagher, Director of the Frank Porter 
Graham Child Development Center, Chapel Hill, and 
Chairman of the State Competency Testing Commis- 
sion, will speak for the Kappa Delta Pi Spring Semes- 
ter Speakers Spring Banquet on Sunday, March 23rd, 



at 5:30 p.m. in the University Ballroom on West 
Campus. 

"FIDDLER ON THE ROOF" 

Hoof V Horn, the oldest student musical theatre 
group in the South, is proud to present the hit 
Broadway musical "Fiddler On The Roof" on Friday, 
April 4th, Saturday, April 5th, and Friday, May 9th at 
8:30 p.m. in Page Auditorium. At 8:30 p.m. Saturday, 
May 10th, there will be a special performance of this 
touching musical reserved especially for the family and 
friends of the Class of 1980. 

"Fiddler On The Roof" marks the seventeenth 
annual Hoof 'n' Horn Spring production of a Broad- 
way show following over thirty years of original 
student written musicals. It is one of the classical 
Broadway musicals, telling the story of Tevye, the 
Dairyman, and of his family and friends in their 
peasant village Anatevka on the eve of the Russian 
revolutionary period. Theatre-goers will remember 
such wonderful songs as "Tradition," "Match- 
maker," "Sunrise, Sunset," and "If I Were a Rich 
Man." 

Tickets for the April 4th, April 5th, and May 9th 
performances are now on sale at Page Box Office 
between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. for $4, 
$5, and $6 Reserved Seating. Tickets for the May 10th 
performance will go on sale April 7th for the general 
public. Master Charge or Visa purchases are available 
over the phone between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 
3:00 p.m. at 684-3227. 

TRIANGLE DANCE GUILD 

AT DUKE PRESENTS 

PAULINE KONER DANCE CONSORT 

The Triangle Dance Guild at Duke will present the 
Pauline Koner Dance Consort in the final recital of the 
season on Friday evening, March 28th at 8:00 p.m. in 
Page Auditorium. Tickets priced at $4.00 for students 
and those 65 and over and $5.00 for the general public 
are now available at Page Box Office on Monday- 
Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. Master Charge/ 
Visa purchases may be made by phone from 10:00 
a.m. -3:00 p.m. 

One of Modern Dance greats, Pauline Koner' s 
Company, according to Clive Barnes," is a very 
special troup. The dancers are lovely — the company 
has an expressive shape and energy that is really very 
impressive." 

The company has performed at the American Dance 
Festival in both Connecticut and Durham. Miss 
Koner, of course, is always a valued member of ADF's 
faculty. The repertory ranges from the romantic and 
lyric to the starkly dramatic with interjection of clever 
humor and whimsy. The music used stems from 
medieval through the classics to commissioned con- 
temporary scores. Another critic describes the Koner 
choreography as "a model of intelligence and taste 
that rejects trendiness and fads and is solidly built on 
the enduring fundamentals of dance and theater." 



The program is as follows: 

MOSAIC (1977) 

Choreograph\ Pauline Koner 

Music: Johann Sebastian Bach 

Costumes: A. Christina Giannini 

Lighting: John McKernon 

I OF GREETING 

II OF DREAMING 

III OF MERRYMAKING 

POEME(1968) 

Choreography: Pauline Koner 

Music: Samuel Barber 

Costumes: A. Christina Giannini 

Lighting: John McKernon 

SOLITARY SONGS 

Choreography: Pauline Koner 

Music: Luciano Verio 

Costumes: Evelyn Miller 

Lighting: Gary Barnes 

I. Movement 
II. Movement (homage to Fritz Mahler) 

III. Movement 

IV. Movement 
FLIGHT (1979) 

Choreography: Pauline Koner 

Music: Joaquin Rodrigo 

Costumes: A. Christina Giannini 

Lighting: John McKernon 

I. Kite Flight 

II. Heavenly Flight 

III. Flight of Fancy 

An open and free Master Class will be held in the 
East Campus Ark on Saturday, March 29th at 10:00 
a.m. 

This residency is supported in part by the Mary 
Duke Biddle Foundation, the Nat'l Endowment for the 
Arts and the N. C. Arts Council. 

ABBA EBAN SPEAKS ON 
THE MIDDLE EAST PEACE PROCESS" 

Abba Eban, former Foreign Minister, Ambassador 
to the United States, Chief Delegate to the United 
Nations from Israel, and author of The Middle East in 
World Politics will speak on "The Middle East Peace 
Process" on Thursday, April 10th, at 8:00 p.m. in Page 
Auditorium. He will be sponsored by Duke University 
Hillel Foundation and the Duke University Unions 
Major Speaker's Committee. The co-sponsors are the 
Department of Judaic Studies, the Department of 
Political Science, Duke-UNC International Security 
Affairs Seminar, Durham-Chapel Hill Jewish Federa- 
tion, and the Institute of Policy Sciences and Public 
Affairs. A limited number of tickets (500), priced at 
$5.00 general admission, will be available to the 
community beginning Wednesday, March 12th at Page 
Box Office. Student tickets, priced $1.50, will go on 
sale Thursday, April 3rd. If there are any remaining 
seats as of Monday, April 7th, they will become 
available to the community. Tickets payable to Duke 
University may also be purchased by mail order to 
Page Box Office, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, 
N. C. 27706. Please enclose a self-addressed, stamped 
envelope for ticket return. 



DUKE CHAPEL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA 
PRESENT BACH'S "ST. MATHEW PASSION" 

THE PASSION OF OUR LORD ACCORDING TO 
ST. MATTHEW by Johann Sebastian Bach will be 
performed in Duke Chapel on Sunday, March 30 at 
4:00 p.m. It will be presented in two sessions with an 
intermission for dinner. 

Tickets priced at $3.00 are available at Page Box 
Office or by writing PASSION, Box 4822 Duke Sta- 
tion, Durham, NC 27706. Be sure to state the number 
of tickets desired and enclose a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope for ticket return. Please make 
checks payable to Duke University. Mail orders will 
be accepted through March 20. 

A buffet dinner will be served at intermission. Tick- 
ets for the performance and buffet are priced at $10.00 
and must be purchased in advance. 

Featured with the 180-member Duke Chapel Choir 
and 30-member orchestra will be soloists Marsha An- 
drews, soprano: Cynthia Donnell, alto; Michael Best, 
tenor; and Wayne Lail, bass. The role of the 
Evangelist will be sung by Joseph Blanton and Jesus 
will be sung by Donald Boothman. Instrumental solo- 
ists will include Margaret Johnston on viola da gamba 
and Michael and Lois Schultz on oboe d'amore. The 
35-member Durham Boys Choir will also be featured. 
Mr. J. Benjamin Smith. Director of Chapel Music, will 
conduct the performance. 

THE ANNE FLEXNER MEMORIAL AWARD 
FOR CREATIVE WRITING 

The Anne Flexner Memorial Award is offered annu- 
ally for the best piece of creative writing submitted by 
an undergraduate student at Duke University. 
First Prize $200.00 

Second Prize $100.00 

Third Prize $ 50.00 

CONDITIONS 

1. The prize is open to all undergraduates, both men 
and women. 

2. Only short stories (7500-word limit), one-act plays 
(7500-word limit), and poetry (200-line limit) are 
eligible. 

3. Only one manuscript may be submitted by any 
contestant. 

4. All manuscripts must be typed double spaced and 
must be delivered to the English Office (325 Allen 
Building) by 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday. 19 March. 
The author's name and address must appear 
nowhere except on a separate sheet placed before 
the manuscript. 

DUKE HOMESITES— HOUSES FOR SALE 

Only those homes located on lots originally de- 
veloped and sold by the University and which are still 
owned by a member of the faculty or staff of the 
University will be listed in the University Calendar. 
Call Fred E. Miller at extension 2054 for information 



regarding listings. Call the appropriate number listed 
below for information regarding a particular house. 

Location: 2409 Perkins Road 

Phone: 489-9226 

Number of Bedrooms: Three (3) 

Number of Baths: Three (3) 

Type of heating/air conditioning: Oil hot air heatV 

central air. 



Location: 2417 Wrightwood 

Phone: 489-7761 

Number of Bedrooms: Five (5) 

Number of Baths: Two (2) 

Type of heating/air conditioning: Gas Heat/Central air 



Location: 1121 Anderson Street 

Phone: 489-8052 

Number of Bedrooms: Three (3) 

Number of Baths: One (1) full; Two (2) half 

Type of heating/air conditioning: Oil heat/forced air: 

central air conditioning 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. James Leon Holmes for the Ph.D. 
degree in Political Science was held on Thursday. February 28th. 
The subject of Mr. Holmes' dissertation was "What Shall We Be? A 
Study of the Political Thought of Three Black Americans." The 
committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors 
David Price, presiding. Peter Fisher, John Hallowell. Ronald 
Rogowski. and Sydney Nathans. 



The final examination of Mr. Edward Joseph Duffy for the Ph.D. 
degree in Sociology was held on Friday. February 29th. The subject 
of Mr. Duffy's dissertation was "Family Social Status and Fertil- 



ity." The committee conducting the examination consisted of 
Professors George C. Meyers, presiding. Charles H. Hirschman. Ida 
Harper Simpson. Joel Smith, and Max A. Woodbury. 

The final examination of Mr. Michael Thomas Crimmins for the 
Ph.D. degree in Chemistry was held on Thursda\ . March 6th. The 
subject of Mr. Crimmins' dissertation was "Synthetic Applications 
of Photoannelations: I. Valerolactones II. The Alleged Genipic Acid 
III. Sarracenin." The committee conducting the examination con- 
sisted of Professors Steven W. Baldwin, presiding. Peter W. Jeffs. 
Daniel D. Sternbach. Louis D. Quin. and Gerald Rosen. 

The final examination of Ms. Blair Kilpatrick-Tabak for the Ph.D. 
degree in Psychology will be held on Monday, March 17th at 9.00 
a.m. in Room 222 Sociology-Psychology Building. The subject of 
Ms. Blair Kilpatrick-Tabak" s dissertation is "Helplessness. Hope- 
lessness, and the Recovery Process in Psychiatric Patients." The 
committee to conduct the examination consists of Professors Susan 
Roth, presiding. Philip Costanzo. Robert Carson, John Coie. and 
Kurt Back. 

The final examination of Mr. Kwaku Twum-Baah for the Ph.D. 
degree in Sociology will be held on Monday, March 17th at 9:30 a.m. 
in Room 258 Sociology/Psychology Building. The subject of Mr. 
Twum-Baah's dissertation is "Migrant-Nonmigrant Differentials in 
Labour Underutilization in Ghana." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Charles Hirschman. presiding, 
Joel Smith, George Myers. Alejandro Portes. and E. Roy Wein- 
traub. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE ED.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Derwood Hunneycutt for the Ed.D. 
degree in Education was held on Wednesday. March 5th. The 
subject of Mr. Hunneycutt's dissertation was "A Study of the 
Utilization of Instructional Spaces in Selected Elementary School in 
North Carolina." The committee conducting the examination con- 
sisted of Professors Robert A. Pittillo. presiding, William H. 
Cartwright. David V. Martin. Mary E. Mayesky, and Richard H. 
Leach. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR! 




March 23-30, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published March 21. 1980 



Number 23 



Sunday, March 23 

Through April 3rd D. U. U. Galleries Exhibit: Works by Betty 

Oliver. East Campus Library. 
Through March 26th D. U. U. Galleries Committee: Duke's Pre- 
schoolers Art Exhibit. West Gallery. 104 Flowers Bldg. 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship University Chapel. 
Preacher: Amanda Lee Berry, Student. The Service of Wor- 
ship is Broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
1 1 :30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults; Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30-2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus Union. 
Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine Service 
available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Wake Forest. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00-5:00 p.m. D. U. Union Galleries Committee invites all chil- 
dren to view the preschoolers art exhibit. West Gallery. 104 
Flowers Building. Refreshments served in Flowers Lounge. 

4:00 p.m. Arts in Duke Chapel Presents Organ Recital by David 
McConkey. Duke Chapel. Open to the public. Free. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist, Episcopal. Episcopal Student Center. 
505 Alexander Avenue. A light supper follows this service. 

5:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Spring Semester Speakers Spring Ban- 
quet. Speaker: James J. Gallagher. University Ballroom West 
Campus. 

8:00 p.m. & 10:00 p.m. Baptist Student Union Movie: "THE 
HIDING PLACE." Bio. Sci. 

8:30 p.m. D. U. U. Performing Arts Committee Broadway at 
Duke presents "AIN'T MISBEHAVIN." the Tony Award 
Winning Fats Waller Musical. Page Aud. Sold Out. 

Monday, March 24 

Registration for Fall Semester, 1980 and for Summer. 1980. 
March 24th-March 29th The Archive presents the 1980 
BLACKBURN LITERARY FESTIVAL. All events free. 
(See special notice) 
March 24th-March 30th GREEK WEEK. (Greek Letter Day). 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. The 1980 GINA BACHAUER MEMORIAL 
PIANO MASTER CLASSES with GUIDO AGOSTI. Re- 
hearsal Hall. M. D. Biddle Music Bldg. 
2:00 p.m. WOMEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. N. C. State Univ. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Prof. Karel Liem. Rm. Ill 

Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
7:00. 9:30 p.m. & Midnight Phi Eta Sigma Movie: "SLEUTH." 
Bio. Sci. $1.50. 

Tuesday, March 25 

Registration for Fall Semester. 1980 and for Summer. 1980. 
8:00 a.m. -8: 15 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. The 1980 GINA BACHAUER MEMORIAL 
PIANO MASTER CLASSES with GUIDO AGOSTI. Re- 
hearsal Hall. M. D. Biddle Music Bldg. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 
Community. York Chapel. 



12:10 p.m. Forest Protection Seminar. Speakers: Alan Kanaskie 

and Steve Bonstedt. Rm. 202 Bio. Sci. 
12:30 p.m. University Program in Genetics Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

W. K. Joklik. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics and Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
Paul R. Fantz. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. 

2:00 p.m. MENS TENNIS: Duke vs. Hampton Institute. 

3:00 p.m. "Three Mile Island: A Year Later." Speaker: Commis- 
sioner Victor Gilinsky. The Duke Law Forum. Moot Court- 
room. Law School. 

4:00 p.m. Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Joseph Coyle. 
Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Department of Botany Major Speakers. Speaker: Dr. 
George G. Laties. Rm. 110 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

4:15 p.m. Department of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Prof. Karel 
Liem. Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

4:30 p.m. Duke Institute For Learning In Retirement "Great Deci- 
sion "80" Lecture Series. Speaker: Dr. Ralph Braibanti. 
Gross Chem. Aud. 

4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Eucharist. Duke Chapel Crvpt. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: 'THE AMERICAN 
FRIEND." Dir. by Wim Wenders. Stars Bruno Ganz. Dennis 
Hopper. A complex, menacing, visually rich thriller about the 
strange crisscrossings between a Hamburg artisan, a French 
gangster, and a mysterious American go-between. Widely 
considered the major revelation of 1977 Cannes and New 
York Film Festivals. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; 
Others $1.50. 

8:00-11:00 p.m. GREEK WEEK SORORITY VOLLEYBALL 
CHAMPIONSHIPS. East Campus Gym. 

8:00-12:00 p.m. GREEK WEEK FRATERNITY BASKETBALL 
CHAMPIONSHIPS. I. M. Bldg. Free. 

8:00 p.m. Perspectives on Aging Lecture Series. Speaker: George 
J. Alexander. Searle Center DUMC. 

8:15 p.m. DUKE UNIVERSITY WIND SYMPHONY SPRING 
CONCERT. Page. Free. 

Wednesday, March 26 

Registration for Fall Semester, 1980, and for Summer, 1980. 

8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist Episcopal. Memorial Chapel. Duke 
Chapel. 

8:00 a.m. -8:15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. The 1980 GINA BACHAUER MEMORIAL 
PIANO MASTER CLASSES with GUIDO AGOSTI. Re- 
hearsal Hall, M. D. Biddle Music Bldg. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

1:00 p.m. -2:30 p.m. Political Science Department Colloquium 
Series. Speaker: Prof. William E. Leuchtenburg. Rm. 204 
Perkins Library. 

2:00 p.m. MEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. University of Iowa. 

3:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. N. C. State Univ. 

3:30 p.m. Duke Colloquia on The Fate of Social Programs in an 
Age of Fiscal Austerity. Speaker: Frank Levy. Rm. 204 Per- 
kins Library. Public is invited. 



4:00 p.m. Henry W. Newsom Memorial Lecture. Speaker: Dr. 

John H. Gibbons. Rm. 114 Physics. 
4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 

the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 
7:00, 9:15. & 11:30 p.m. Trent I Movie: "ANIMAL HOUSE." 

Bio. Sci. $1.50. 
7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services Program: "AESOP'S FAL- 

LIBLES" The Bragtown Childrens' Theatre. Courtyard 

Dining Rm., Hosp. 
8:00 p.m. Religion and Public Affairs Lectures. Speaker: Harold 

Berman. Duke Divinity Alumni Memorial Commons Rm. 
8:00-12:00 p.m. GREEK WEEK FRATERNITY BASKETBALL 

CHAMPIONSHIPS. Free. I. M. Bldg. 

Thursday, March 27 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. The 1980 GINA BACHAUER MEMORIAL 
PIANO MASTER CLASSES with GUIDO AGOSTI. Re- 
hearsal Hall. M. D. Biddle Music Bldg. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

1:00 p.m. The Duke Institute For Learning In Retirement. 
Speaker: James Mclntyre. Campus Center, East Campus. 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Central Conn. State 

2:00 p.m. MENS TENNIS: Duke vs. Northwestern Univ. 

2:00 p.m. WOMEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. Indiana Univ. 

3:45 p.m. Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts And Sciences 
Meeting. Rm. 139 Social Sciences. 

4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist, Episcopal. Memorial Chapel. Duke 
Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "THE TRIAL." Stars Antony 
Perkins, Jeanne Moreau, Welles. Gripping adaptation of 
Kafka's novel about a man in a nameless country arrested for 
a crime that is never explained to him. Bio. Sci. Duke Under- 
grads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 

Friday, March 28 

March 28th-30th Department of Romance Languages of Duke and 
UNC-Chapel Hill and the Program of Medieval and Renais- 
sance Studies of Duke are co-sponsoring an International 
Symposium on Montaigne, to commemorate the quadricen- 
tennial publication of the Essais (1580). 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. The 1980 GINA BACHAUER MEMORIAL 
PIANO MASTER CLASSES with GUIDO AGOSTI. Re- 
hearsal Hall, M. D. Biddle Music Bldg. 
12:00 Noon Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 

011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Department of Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Max 

E. Gottesman. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Leslie Tolley. Rm. 144 
Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Conn. State. 

4:00 p.m. Department of Chemistry and Phi Lambda Upsilon 
NINTH DOUGLAS G. HILL MEMORIAL LECTURE. 
Speaker: Dr. Russell S. Drago. Rm. 107 Paul M. Gross Lab. 

7:00. 9:30 p.m. & 12:00 Midnight Freewater Films: "THEY 
SHOOT HORSES, DON'T THEY?" Dir. by Sidney Pollack. 
Stars Jane Fonda, Michael Sarrazin, Gig Young. A Depres- 
sion Era marathon dance becomes a microcosm of life, with a 
myriad of subplots. Fonda is a spunky loser who gives survi- 
val one last shot and attracts aimless Sarrazin with tragic 
results. Young won an Oscar as the emcee. Rated PG. Bio. 
Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free: Others $1.50. 

8:00 p.m. Triangle Dance Guild at Duke presents PAULINE 
KONER DANCE CONSORT. Page. $4. students/65 ±; $5. 
General Public. 



Saturday, March 29 

9-4 p.m. Alternative careers for teachers. Gross Auditorium 
10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:00 a.m. PAULINE KONER TALK AND MASTER CLASS. 

Open and free. East Campus Ark. 
11:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. All-Campus Carnival. Residential Quad, West 
Campus. 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Clemson Univ. 

2:00 p.m. MEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. Univ. of Virginia. 

5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "BREAKING AWAY." 
Immensely appealing and unusual. Four townies looked 
down upon by Indiana University college students face class 
barriers, frustrating futures — and the Little 500 bicycle race. 
Entertaining performances, bright dialogue, exciting cycling 
sequences. Stars Dennis Christopher, Paul Dooley, Barbara 
Barrie. Dir. Peter Yates. PG. Page. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Department of Music: CIOMPI QUARTET. EDMR. 
Free. 
Sunday, March 30 (PALM SUNDAY) 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:55 a.m. (PALM SUNDAY) University Service of Worship Uni- 
versity Chapel. Preacher: Bishop James Armstrong, Resident 
Bishop, The Dakotas Area, The United Methodist Church, 
Aberdeen, South Dakota. The Service of Worship is Broad- 
cast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults; V4 price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
1 1:30-2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus Union. 
Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine Service 
available after 1:00 p.m. 

1:00-4:30 p.m. THE GREEK GAMES: East Campus. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Clemson Univ. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

4:00 p.m. Duke Chapel Choir and Orchestra present Bach's "ST. 
MATHEW PASSION." $3.00 Performance and $10.00 
Performance/Buffet. Duke Chapel. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center, 505 Alex- 
ander. A light supper is served following the service. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "BREAKING AWAY." 
Immensely appealing and unusual. Four townies looked 
down upon by Indiana University college students face class 
barriers, frustrating futures — and the Little 500 bicycle race. 
Entertaining performances, bright dialogue, exciting cycling 
sequences. Stars Dennis Christopher, Paul Dooley, Barbara 
Barrie. Dir. Peter Yates. PG. Page. $1.50. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION 
GALLERIES COMMITTEE 

Enjoy paintings, drawings, and paper mache 
sculpture created by Duke's supremely talented pre- 
schoolers March 3rd-26th in the West Gallery, 104 
Flowers Building. On Sunday, March 23rd, all children 
are invited to view the exhibit. Refreshments will be 
served between 3 and 5 p.m. in Flowers Lounge. 

ARTS IN DUKE CHAPEL PRESENTS 
ORGAN RECITAL BY DAVID McCONKEY 

The Arts in Duke Chapel presents a recital by David 
McConkey, Associate Chapel Organist, on the Aeolian 
organ in the chapel on Sunday afternoon, March 23rd, 
at 4:00 p.m. The program will include nineteenth and 
early twentieth century pieces for Lent and Passion- 
tide from Germany, England, and France. Works to be 
heard include those of Felix Mendelssohn, Sir Charles 
Hubert Hastings Parry, Herbert Howells, Marcel 



Dupre, and Sigfrid Karg-Elert. Featured will be five 
movements of Le Chemin de la Croix by Marcel 
Dupre. This work, whose title can be literally trans- 
lated "the way of the cross," consists of musical 
representations of scenes of Christ on the walk to the 
cross, dying on the cross and being buried. The public 
is invited to this recital for which there is no admission 
charge. 

KAPPA DELTA PI 
SPRING SEMESTER SPEAKER 

James J. Gallagher, Director of the Frank Porter 
Graham Child Development Center, Chapel Hill, and 
Chairman of the State Competency Testing Commis- 
sion, will speak for the Kappa Delta Pi Spring Semes- 
ter Speakers Spring Banquet on Sunday, March 23rd, 
at 5:30 p.m. in the University Ballroom on West 
Campus. 

THE ARCHIVE PRESENTS THE 1980 
BLACKBURN LITERARY FESTIVAL 

Monday, March 24 
John Balaban, poet 

8:00 p.m., York Chapel, Gray Building 
Tuesday, March 25 
Student Reading 
5:00 p.m., Gothic Bookshop, Page Building 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of March 30th- April 
6th is Monday, March 24th, before 1:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



Wednesday, March 26 
Reynolds Price, novelist 
5:00 p.m., 226 Perkins Library 
Thursday, March 27 
Richard Price, novelist 
8:00 p.m., 226 Perkins Library 
Friday, March 28 

Bruce Davidson, photographer 
speaking on "The Personal Photographer as an 
Autobiographer" 

8:00 p.m.. Gross Chem. Auditorium 
Saturday, March 29 
Photography Symposia 

10:00 a.m. featuring Cliff Haac 
11:45 a.m. David Page, "The Hugh Mangum 
Photographic Center" 

1:30 p.m. JohnMenapace, the "Janus Eye" Zener 
Auditorium, Soc-Psych Building 
Two Robert Frank films: 
3:30 p.m. "Pull My Daisy" 
4:15 p.m. "Conversations in Vermont" 
Zener Auditorium, Soc-Psych 
Allen Ginsberg, poet 

8:00 p.m., York Chapel, Gray Building 
ADMISSION FREE TO ALL EVENTS. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology, through The Cocos 
Foundation Training Grant in Morphology, will pre- 
sent two lectures by Professor Karl Liem, The Agassiz 
Museum, Harvard University. On Monday, March 
24th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological Sciences 
Building, Professor Liem will speak on "Cichlid 
Fishes: Redundancy and Modulation of the Feeding 
Apparatus." On Tuesday, March 25th, at 4:15 p.m. in 
Room 1 1 1 Biological Sciences Building, Professor 
Liem will speak on "The Fish Head as a Network of 
Interacting Constraints." Coffee and tea will be served 
at 4:00 p.m. on Monday only. 

FOREST PROTECTION SEMINAR 

The School of Forestry and Environmental Studies 
presents a Forest Protection Seminar on Tuesday, 
March 25th, at 12:10 p.m. in Room 202 Biological Sci- 
ences. Alan Kanaskie will speak on "Forest Pest 
Management in Planning for Multiple Use of the Duke 
Forest" and Steve Bonstedt will speak on "Cankering 
and Sporulation of Endothia parasitica on Scarlet and 
Post Oaks." 



UNIVERSITY PROGRAM IN 
GENETICS SEMINAR 

Dr. W. K. Joklik, James P. Duke Professor, Chair- 
man of the Department of Microbiology and Immunol- 
ogy, will speak on "The Structure and Function of the 
Reovirus Genome" for the University Program in Ge- 
netics Seminar on Tuesday, March 25th at 12:30 p.m. 
in Room 147 of the Nanaline H. Duke Building. 



PLANT SYSTEMATICS AND 
EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

Dr. Paul R. Fantz, Department of Horticultural Sci- 
ences, North Carolina State University will speak on 
"An introduction to the butterfly peas, Clitoria 
(Leguminosae: Glycineae.'*) for the Plant Systematics 
and Evolution Seminar on Tuesday, March 25th, at 
12:30 p.m. in Room 130 Biological Sciences. A 
graduate of the University of Florida, Dr. Fantz held 
an adjunct professorship in the Department of Botany 
there, and a postdoctoral position as Horticultural 
Taxonomist at the Fairchild Tropical Garden. 

'THREE MILE ISLAND: A YEAR LATER 

The Duke Law Forum invites everyone to hear 
Commissioner Victor Gilinsky of the Nuclear Regula- 
tory Commission speak about 'Three Mile Island: A 
Year Later" on Tuesday, March 25th at 3:00 p.m. in 
the Moot Courtroom of the Law School. Question and 
answer period and reception will follow. 

PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Joseph Coyle, M.D., Departments of Pharmacology 
and Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of 
Medicine, will speak on "Fetally Induced Abnormality 
in Cortical Innervation By Catecholamine Neurons" 
for the Department of Pharmacology Seminar on 
Tuesday, March 25th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 147 in the 
Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee will be served in 
the lobby at 3:45 p.m. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 
MAJOR SPEAKERS 

Dr. George G. Laties, Department of Biology, Uni- 
versity of California, Los Angeles, California, will 
speak on "Cyanide-resistant respiration in plant tis- 
sues in relation to ethylene responsiveness'" for the 
Department of Botany Major Speakers on Tuesday, 
March 25th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 110 Biological Sci- 
ences Building. An informal wine and cheese reception 
will follow in the Botany Greenhouses. 

Dr. Laties received his Ph.D. from the University of 
California at Berkeley. In addition to his current re- 
search in the regulation of the cyanide-resistant path- 
way, he is interested generally in the regulatory 
mechanism in respiration and the importance of mem- 
brane biosynthesis and degradation in plant tissues in 
the control of metabolism. 

DUKE INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING 

IN RETIREMENT 

"GREAT DECISION 80" LECTURE SERIES 

The second lecture in the Great Decisions '80 
Lecture/Discussion Series will be given March 25th at 
4:30 in the auditorium of the Gross Chemistry Build- 
ing. "Great Decisions" is sponsored by the Duke In- 
stitute for Learning in Retirement with a grant from the 
North Carolina Humanities Committee. 

Dr. Ralph Braibanti, Director of Islamic and Ara- 
bian Development Studies at Duke, will speak on 
"The Mideast and the Gulf: United States Policy in 



Ferment." Dr. Braibanti is a James B. Duke Professor 
of Political Science and was selected for an Outstand- 
ing Professor Award by the students. 

PERSPECTIVES ON AGING LECTURE SERIES 

George J. Alexander, Dean, Santa Clara School of 
Law, will speak on "Age and the Law" on Tuesday, 
March 25th at 8 p.m. in the Searle Center, Duke Uni- 
versity Medical Center. Dean Alexander's lecture is 
one in a series on Perspectives on Aging sponsored by 
the Center for the Study of Aging and Human De- 
velopment in cooperation with Colonial Penn Group, 
Inc. Please contact Betty Ray, Box 3003, Duke Uni- 
versity Medical Center, Durham NC 27710 (telephone 
684-2248) for free tickets for the lecture and informa- 
tion on the upcoming lecture "Old Wives' Tales" by 
Professor Anne Scott on April 22nd. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY WIND SYMPHONY 

The Duke University Wind Symphony will present 
their Spring Concert on Tuesday, March 25th, at 8:15 
p.m. in Page Auditorium, under the direction of Paul 
Bryan. Composer Edgar Warren Williams, Jr., a 
former graduate of the Music Department, will be on 
hand to conduct his composition, "Across a Bridge of 
Dreams," "Songs of Mourning" (1978-79), which was 
commissioned by the Wind Symphony. Also included 
in the program which is open to the public without 
charge will be Franz Krommer's Partita; Giuseppe 
Verdi's Overture to La Forza del Destino and Modest 
Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 
COLLOQUIUM SERIES 

Professor William E. Leuchtenburg, Columbia Uni- 
versity and the National Humanities Center, will speak 
on "Harry Truman: In the Shadow of FDR" for the 
Political Science Department Colloquium Series on 
Wednesday, March 26th, at 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. in 
Room 204 Perkins Library. 

INSTITUTE OF POLICY SCIENCES 
AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS COLLOQUIUM 

The Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs at 
Duke University will sponsor the last lecture in a col- 
loquia series on "The Fate of Social Programs in an 
Age of Fiscal Austerity." Frank Levy, a senior Re- 
search Associate at the Urban Institute, will speak on 
"How and Why Local Governments Have Grown" on 
Wednesday, March 26th, at 3:00 p.m. in Room 204 
Perkins Library. Dr. Levy is the author of "On Under- 
standing Proposition 13" which appeared in a recent 
issue of The Public Interest. 

DUKE COLLOQUIA ON 
THE FATE OF SOCIAL PROGRAMS 
IN AN AGE OF FISCAL AUSTERITY 

Frank Levy, a Senior Research Associate for the 
Urban Institute, will conclude the Duke Colloquia on 
The Fate of Social Programs in an Age of Fiscal Au- 






sterity with a talk titled, "How and Why Local Gov- 
ernment Have Grown.*' The colloquium which is 
sponsored by The Institute of Policy Sciences and 
Public Affairs will be held on Wednesday, March 26th, 
at 3:30 p.m. in Room 204 Perkins Library. The public 
is invited. 

HENRY W. NEWSON MEMORIAL LECTURE 

Dr. John H. Gibbons, Director, Office of Technol- 
ogy Assessment, Congress of the United States, will 
give the first Henry W. Newson Memorial Lecture, on 
Wednesday, March 26th, at 4:00 p.m. in 114 Physics. 
Dr. Gibbons was Professor Newson' s first graduate 
student in Nuclear Physics at Duke University in the 
early 1950s. Dr. Gibbon's talk will be entitled, "Con- 
fessions of a Wayward Physicist." 

RELIGION AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS LECTURES 

The Department of Religion is sponsoring the con- 
cluding lecture in a series of Conversations with Na- 
tional Humanities Scholars on "Religion and Public 
Affairs: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives," 
to be held in the Duke Divinity Alumni Memorial 
Commons Room at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 
26th. Harold Berman will speak on "The Interaction of 
Law and Religion in America." 

Professor Berman is James Barr Ames Professor of 
Law at Harvard University where he has been teach- 
ing since 1948. He has written and lectured extensively 
on Soviet affairs and has been active in promoting the 
teaching of law in the liberal arts curriculum. His 
book, The Nature and Finn lions of Law: An Intro- 
duction for Students of the Arts and Sciences is widely 
used in college courses. 

THE DUKE INSTITUTE FOR 
LEARNING IN RETIREMENT 

James Mclntyre. Director of the Durham Arts 
Council, will speak on "Arts Councils, Who Needs 
Them' 1 " on Thursday, March 27th, at 1:00 p.m. at the 
Campus Center on the East Campus. 

UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL 
OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

There will be a meeting of the Undergraduate Fac- 
ulty Council of Arts and Sciences on Thursday, March 
27th. at 3:45 p.m., in Room 139 Social Sciences. 

INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM 
ON MONTAIGNE 

The Department of Romance Languages of Duke 
and UNC-Chapel Hill and the Program of Medieval 
and Renaissance Studies of Duke are co-sponsoring an 
International Symposium on Montaigne, March 28th- 
30th to commemorate the quadricentennial publication 
of the Essais (1580). A display of early editions of 
Essais will be in the Rare Book Room. The public is 
cordially invited to the following lectures: 
Friday. March 28: UNC-Chapel Hill. Toy Lounge. Dey Hall 

3:00 p.m. Claude Blum, Universite de Paris X-Nanterre 

"Les additions aux deux premiers livres des Essais et le piojet 
autobiographique de Montaigne" 



4:00 p.m. Barbara Bowen, University of Illinois-Champaign- 
Urbana 
"Content vs. Style in Du parler prompt ou tardif (I, x)" 
Saturday, March 29: Duke University 
Morning: Breedlove Conference Room, Perkins Library 
9:30 a.m. Michel Beaujour. New York University 

" Consideration sur Ciceron' (I, xl), I'alongeail comme mar- 
que generique: La lettre et l'essai" 
10:45 a.m. Francois Rigolot. Princeton University 
"Poetique de la marge" 
Afternoon: Rare Book Room, Perkins Library 

2:15 p.m. I. D. McFarlane, Wadham College, Oxford University 
"Montaigne's Entrees en matiere" 
On Saturday, March 29th, at the Gala Dinner in the Grand Ball 
Room of the Duke Union, at 8:00 p.m., Robert Aulotte of the Sor- 
bonne will deliver the Discours d'Honneur: "Montaigne ou le devoir 
d'etre heureux." Anyone wishing to attend the dinner should con- 
tact the Department of Romance Languages, 684-3706. 
Sunday. March 30: UNC-Chapel Hill, Toy Lounge, Dey Hall 
9:30 a.m. Eva Kushner, McGill University 

"Dialogue et monologue dans les deux premiers livres des Es- 
sais 
10:45 a.m. Donald Frame, Columbia University 

"But What Are Essays? Montaigne Read in 1580" 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

Dr. Max E. Gottesman, Laboratory of Molecular 
Biology, National Center Institute, Bethesda. Mary- 
land, will speak on "Bacterial Genes Under Bac- 
teriophage Lambda Control" for the Department of 
Biochemistry Seminar on Friday, March 28th, at 12:30 
p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee 
will be served at 12:15 p.m. in the lobby. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Leslie Tolley, Graduate Student, Department of 
Botany, will speak on "Does CO., Enrichment Affect 
Seed Germination? Tales of a Phytotron Quest " for 
the Plant Ecology Seminar on Friday, March 28th, at 
12:30 p.m. in Room 144 of the Biological Sciences 
Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

AND PHI LAMBDA UPSILON 

NINTH DOUGLAS G. HILL 

MEMORIAL LECTURE 

The Department of Chemistry and Phi Lambda Up- 
silon announce the Ninth Douglas G. Hill Memorial 
Lecture on Friday, March 28th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
107 Paul M. Gross Laboratory. A reception will be 
held following the lecture. Dr. Russell S. Drago, Uni- 
versity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will speak on 
"The Binding and Activation of Dioxygen." 

Professor Drago, a native of Turners Falls, Mas- 
sachusetts, received his B. S. degree from the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts in 1950 and his Ph.D. degree 
from Ohio State University in 1954. In 1955, he joined 
the faculty of the University of Illinois where he has 
remained. He has directed research leading to the 
Ph.D. degree for seventy-five students and is author or 
co-author of over two hundred journal articles. In rec- 
ognition of his research accomplishments, he received, 
in 1969, the American Chemical Society Award for 
Research in Inorganic Chemistry, sponsored by Texas 



Instruments. In 1970 he was awarded a one-year ap- 
pointment to the Center for Advance Study at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois and in 1973-74 he was a Guggenheim 
Fellow. 

He is author of the textbook, "Physical Methods in 
Inorganic Chemistry,'* co-author of "Acids and 
Bases," and author of several books for freshman 
chemistry. Professor Drago has presented invited lec- 
tures at most of the major universities in the United 
States, Canada and Europe. 

TRIANGLE DANCE GUILD 

AT DUKE PRESENTS 

PAULINE KONER DANCE CONSORT 

The Triangle Dance Guild at Duke will present the 
Pauline Koner Dance Consort in the final recital of the 
season on Friday evening, March 28th at 8:00 p.m. in 
Page Auditorium. Tickets priced at $4.00 for students 
and those 65 and over and $5.00 for the general public 
are now available at Page Box Office on Monday- 
Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. Master Charge/ 
Visa purchases may be made by phone from 10:00 
a.m. -3:00 p.m. 

One of Modern Dance greats, Pauline Koner' s 
Company, according to Clive Barnes," is a very 
special troup. The dancers are lovely — the company 
has an expressive shape and energy that is really very 
impressive." 

The company has performed at the American Dance 
Festival in both Connecticut and Durham. Miss 
Koner, of course, is always a valued member of ADF's 
faculty. The repertory ranges from the romantic and 
lyric to the starkly dramatic with interjection of clever 
humor and whimsy. The music used stems from 
medieval through the classics to commissioned con- 
temporary scores. Another critic describes the Koner 
choreography as "a model of intelligence and taste 
that rejects trendiness and fads and is solidly built on 
the enduring fundamentals of dance and theater." 

The program is as follows: 

MOSAIC (1977) 

Choreography: Pauline Koner 

Music: Johann Sebastian Bach 

Costumes: A. Christina Giannini 

Lighting: John McKemon 

I OF GREETING 

II OF DREAMING 

III OF MERRYMAKING 

POEM E 11968) 

Choreography: Pauline Koner 

Music: Samuel Barber 

Costumes: A. Christina Giannini 

Lighting: John McKernon 

SOLITARY SONGS 

Choreography: Pauline Koner 

Music: Luciano Verio 

Costumes: Evelyn Miller 

Lighting: Gary Barnes 

I. Movement 

II. Movement (homage to Fritz Mahler) 

III. Movement 

IV. Movement 
FLIGHT (1979) 

Choreography: Pauline Koner 



Music: Joaquin Rodrigo 

Costumes: A. Christina Giannini 

Lighting: John McKernon 

I. Kite Flight 

II. Heavenly Flight 

III. Flight of Fancy 

An open and free Master Class will be held in the 
East Campus Ark on Saturday, March 29th at 10:00 
a.m. 

This residency is supported in part by the Mary 
Duke Biddle Foundation, the Nat'l Endowment for the 
Arts and the N. C. Arts Council. 

ALL-CAMPUS CARNIVAL 
The Duke University All-Campus Carnival is having 
its second annual carnival on Saturday, March 29th, 
from 11:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. on the Residential Quad, 
West Campus. The carnival will have bands, enter- 
tainment, food booths, drink booths and game booths. 
All proceeds will go to Camp Kaliedoscope, a camp 
proposed by the Duke University Pediatric Depart- 
ment for children with chronic illnesses. The public is 
cordially invited to attend. 

CIOMPI QUARTET 

The Ciompi Quartet will present a concert on Satur- 
day, March 29th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music 
Room. The program which is sponsored by the De- 
partment of Music will include Dvorak's Quartet in E b , 
Op. 51; Stravinsky's Three Pieces for String Quartet; 
and Beethoven's Quartet in E minor. Op. 59 #2. The 
public is invited to this recital for which there is no 
charge. 

DUKE CHAPEL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA 
PRESENT BACH'S "ST. MATHEW PASSION" 

THE PASSION OF OUR LORD ACCORDING TO 
ST. MATTHEW by Johann Sebastian Bach will be 
performed in Duke Chapel on Sunday, March 30 at 
4:00 p.m. It will be presented in two sessions with an 
intermission for dinner. 

Tickets priced at $3.00 are available at Page Box 
Office or by writing PASSION, Box 4822 Duke Sta- 
tion. Durham, NC 27706. Be sure to state the number 
of tickets desired and enclose a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope for ticket return. Please make 
checks payable to Duke University. Mail orders will 
be accepted through March 20. 

A buffet dinner will be served at intermission. Tick- 
ets for the performance and buffet are priced at $10.00 
and must be purchased in advance. 

Featured with the 180-member Duke Chapel Choir 
and 30-member orchestra will be soloists Marsha An- 
drews, soprano; Cynthia Donnell, alto; Michael Best, 
tenor; and Wayne Lail, bass. The role of the 
Evangelist will be sung by Joseph Blanton and Jesus 
will be sung by Donald Boothman. Instrumental solo- 
ists will include Margaret Johnston on viola da gamba 
and Michael and Lois Schultz on oboe d'amore. The 
35-member Durham Boys Choir will also be featured. 
Mr. J. Benjamin Smith, Director of Chapel Music, will 
conduct the performance. 



APRIL CALENDAR 









SUNDAY 


MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SATURDAY 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 








Through April 3rd 


200pm MENS 


12 00 noon Junior 


2:00p.m. MENS 
TENNIS Dukevs. 


April S-May 12 DUU 








DUU Galleries An 


TENNIS Dukevs 


Recital Dan Via. 


Galleries An 








Exhibit Betty 


Univ of Maryland 


contrabass & Mark 




Exhibit Student 








Oliver East Library 


200p.m. WOMEN'S 


Pana. piano. 


4 00 pm Dept. of 


Juried Show East 








Through April 24th 


TENNIS Dukevs 


Rehearsal Hall. 


Music Lecture by 


Gallery 








DUU Galleries Art 


U ot Tenn -Chat- 


MDBBidg 


Siegfried Kross. 


10:30 a m Freewater 








Exhibit Dollhouse 


tanooga 


7 00 p.m Freewater 


Rm 104MDBB 


Films THE 








Invitational West 


3 00pm LACROSSE 


Films TILLIE S 


7 00. 9 30. 8 Midnight 


PHANTOM 








Campus Gallery 


Dukevs U of 


PUNCTURED 


Freewater Films 


TOLLBOOTH' 








3 00 p.m BASEBALL 




ROMANCE 8 


THE LAST 


(Children) Gross 








Dukevs Davidson 


7 30 pm DUMC 


OUCK SOUP Bio 


WALTZ " Bio Sci. 










4:30-6 OOP m. Great 


Cultural Services 


Sci. 


8 15 pm Piano 


2:00 p.m LACROSSE 








Decision '80 


Program John 


7 30 pm. Chapel 


Recital Students ot 


Duke vs. Univ of 








Lecture Series. 


Osborne. Guitar 


(Maunday 




Delaware. 








John E Fobes. 


Lobby, Hosp Free 


Thursday) The 


EDMR 


8:15p.m Chamber 








Gross Chem Aud. 


8 15pm DUKE 


Reverend Juanita B. 


8 30 p.m Hoot n 


Arts Society 








7 0081000pm 


UNIVERSITY WIND 


Wright 


Horn FIDDLER 


BEVERIDGE and 








Freewater Films 


SYMPHONY. 


9 30pm Freewater 


ON THE ROOF' 


MICHAEL 








EFFIBRIEST 


Student Recital 


Films SHERLOCK 


Page $4, $5, 8.6 


WEBSTER, Clarinet 








Bio. Sci. 


EDMR 


JR 8 DUCK SOUP 
Bio Sci. 




and Piano $6 
8:30 p.m Hoot n 
Horn FIDDLER 
ON THE ROOF 
Page $4, $5.8 $6 


6 




7 


8 


9 


io 


11 


12 


600am 


2 00p.n 


i MENS 


2 00 p.m MEN S 


2:00 p.m. MEN'S 


2:00 pm WOMEN S 


Southeastern 


Renaissance Conf 


EASTER— Sunrise 


TENNIS Dukevs 


TENNIS Dukevs. 


TENNIS Dukevs. 


TENNIS Dukevs 




10 30a m -Noon. 


Service. Duke 


ECU 




Wake Forest. 


Univ of Richmond. 


UNC 


Conference 




Gardens. The 






4:00-5 00 pm D U 


3.00 p.m BASEBALL 


3 00pm BASEBALL 


10 00am..6:00p.m 


French Organ 


Reverend Dr C G 






Council on Aging 


Duke vs. UNC. 


Dukevs N C 


OU Union Spring 
Fest Mam Quad 


Music Lecture by 


Newsome 






Speaker Orville G 


3 30 p.m LACROSSE 


Wesleyan 


David Fuller Reh. 


9 008 11 00a.m. 






Brim. Jr. RtK. 1504 


Dukevs Guilford 


7.00 p.m. Freewater 


3 00 p.m BASEBALL 


Hall MDB Bldg. 


Chapel EASTER 






Gerontology Bldg 


College 


Films POOL 


Dukevs Ga Tech 


10:30a.m 


(Identical Services 






4 30-6 00 p.m. Great 


7:30pm DUMC 


SHARKS. YOU 


7 00, 9 30 & Midnight 


BASEBALL Duke 


of Worship} The 






Decision 80 


Cultural Services 


naztyspy; the 


Freewater Films 


vs. Ga. Tech 


Reverend Robert T. 






Lecture Series. 


Program. Rich 


STRONGMAN ' 


BEAUTY AND THE 


2:00 p.m. India Film 








Jerry F Hough 


Roberson, Guitar 


Bio. Sci 


BEAST Bio. Sci. 


Bio. Sc. 


2 00 p.m MENS 






Gross Aud. 


Main Lobby, Hosp. 


8.00 p.m. ABBA EBAN 




2 00-3 00 p.m 


TENNIS Dukevs 






6 00pm PHI BETA 


Free 


will speak on The 




Colloquium Lecture 


ClemsonUniv 






KAPPA s Annual 


8 00pm DU Major 


Middle East Peace 




by Dirk A Flentrop. 


3 00.7008900pm 






Banquet Meeting. 




Process Page 




Reh. Hall, MDB 


OuadFlix THE 






An Museum 




$1.50 Students $5 




Bldg 


MUPPET MOVIE 






7 004930pm 


Taylor Pousette 


Gen Adm 




7 00 p.m. Organ 


Page $1 50 






Freewater Films A 


Dart Band Site 


8 15pm Faculty 




Recital Fenner 








FREE WOMAN 


TBA $6 & $5 Gen. 


Recital Joyce Peck, 




Douglass Duke 








Bid Sci. 


Public. Free Duke 


soprano & Jane 




Chapel 








8 15 pm. Senior 


Undergrad w ID 


Hawkins, piano 




7:30 p.m Quad Flix 








Recital: S Fred 




9:30 p.m. Freewater 




THE DEER 








Phillips, bassoons 




Films THE PIP 




HUNTER " Page 








Jane Hawkins 




FROM 




$1 50 








piano EDMR 




PITTSBURGH.' 












8 15pm Hillel 




THE GOLF 












presents 




SPECIALIST/THE 












PARVERIN Folk 




STRONG MAN. 












Group Page. 




Bio. Set. 






13 


14 


15 


16 


IT 


18 


19 


10 00 a m. WOMEN'S 


8 I5p 


n. Piano 


2 00pm MENS 


1000a, m. Campus 


1 30 p-m BASEBALL 


7 00. 9 30. 8 Midnight 


10 :30a. m Freewater 


TENNIS Dukevs 


Recit 


il Students ot 


TENNIS UNC. 


Club Coffee and 


Dukevs. St 


Freewater Films. 


Films. BUGSY 


Univ of Va 


Boaz Sharon. 


4 30-6 00 p m. Ouke 


Annual Business 


Andrews College 


WATERSHIP 


MALONE ' 


10 55 a m Chapel. 


EDMR. 


Institute For 


Meeting Mr Ned E. 


(2) 


DOWN Bio Sci 


(Children) Gross 


The Rev Juanita 






Learning In 


Huffman 


70089:30pm 


8 15pm Duke 




Bass Wright 






Retirement 'Great 


Burroughs 


Freewater Films 


Players TOYSIN 


8 15 pm Durham 


2:00 pm BASEBALL 






Decision 80 


Wellcome Research 


WHY WORRY' 


THE ATTIC 


Savoyards Gilbert 


Dukevs Univ of Va 






Lecture Series 


Triangle Park. 


and WAY OUT 


Branson $3. & $4 


8 Sullivan's "HMS 


3:00 p.m D U. Wind 






Charles Hirschman 


4.00 p.m. LACROSSE 


WEST. Bio. Sci 


8 15pm Joint Senior 


PINAFORE Page 


Symphony Garden 






Gross Chem Aud. 


Dukevs N C State 


8:15 p.m. Duke 


Recital Del Curling 


$5. $2 50. $3 00 


Concert Paul 






700&930p.m 




Players TOYSIN 




8 15 pm Duke 


Bryan. Cond 






Freewater Films 


7 30pm DUMC 


THE ATTIC 


Sperry cello. 8 


Players "TOYSIN 


400-5 30 p.m. 






THE WILD DUCK. 


Cultural Services 


Branson $2 50 


Kathryn Huestis, 


THE ATTIC 


Colloquium Lecture 






Bio. Sci. 


Program David and 


815pm Collegium 


piano. EDMR. 


Branson S3 8 $4 


by Larry Todd Reh. 

Hall. MDBBidg 






8 15 p.m. Student 


Karen Kolbinsky 


Muslcum. Jan 


8 15 p.m Durham 








Composer Concert 


and David Crabtree, 


Herlinger. Dir Duke 


Savoyards Gilben 




700 p.m. Organ 






Rehearsal Hall. 


Folksongs Main 


Chapel 


8 Sullivan's HMS 




Recital Louis 






MDB Bldg. 


Lobby, Hosp Free. 




PINAFORE Page 




Robilhard. Lyons, 








8 15pm Senior 




$5. $2.50. $3.00. 




France Chapel 








Recital Diane 








7:30pm Quad Flix 








Alcun&Geraldine 








THE DEER 








Alcurt — Ciompi's 








HUNTER Page. 








Students EDMR. 








$1 50 
















20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


23 


26 


10:55 am Chapel 


SPRING SEMESTER 


4:30-6:00 p.m. Great 


3 30pm LACROSSE 


12 00 Noon Senior 


6 00 p.m. SPRING 


April 26th-May 22nd 


The Reverend Dr 


GRADUATE 


Decision 80' 


Duke vs 


Recital Kenneth 


SEMESTER 


DUU West Galleries 


Harrell Beck 


CLASSES END. 


Lecture Series 


Washington* Lee 




UNDERGRADUATE 


Art Exhibit Ruth 


4 00pm Junior 


3.30 pr 


n Univ 


ArluroA 


Univ 


Joseph Zirkman. 


CLASSES END 


Pinnell. 


Recital Kimberly 


Rev.e 


w Committee 


Valenzuela Gross 


7 30 p.m DUMC 


piano Rehearsal 


7 00. 9 30. 8 Midnight 


11 00 am. -4 00 pm 


Marshall, organ 


Meet 


ng Board 


Chem. Aud 


Cultural Services 


Hall. MDBBidg. 


Freewater Films 


ASDU Ethnic 


Duke Chapel 


Rm . 


Mien 


7 00&930p.m. 


Program Chuck 


7 00 p m. Freewater 


ANDY WARHOLS 


Cultural Days. East 


700&9 15pm 


8:00 pr 


n N C 


Freewater Films 


Holton. Jazz Piano 


Films WRONG 


DRACULA. Bid 




Quad . Flix THE 


SYMPHONY 


WOYZECK " B.o 


and Synthesizer. 


AGAIN 8 


Sci 


2 00 p.m LACROSSE 
Dukevs. Univ. of 


MAIN EVENT 1 




le Djokic. 


Sci. 


Courtyard Dining 


MODERN TIMES 


8 15 p.m. Duke 


Page. $1 50. 


Cello 




7 30 p.m Durham 


Room. Hosp Free 


Bio. Sci. 


Players TOYSIN 


Baltimore. 


8.15p.m. Duke 


Gosll 


1 g. 


Youth Symphony 


8 15pm. Senior 


8:15p.m. Duke 


THE ATTIC 


3:00 p.m D U String 


Players TOYS IN 


Cond 




Paul Bryan 


Recital Charles 


Players TOYSIN 


Branson $3 8 $4 


School Ensembles 


THE ATTIC 


$6 General Public. 


Conductor Page 




THE ATTIC 


8 15pm Senior 


Dorothy Kitchen 


Branson $3 & $4 


$3 Students. 65 * 


8 00 pm Aging In 




Branson $2 50 


Recital. Lisa 


Dir. EDMR 


8 15 p m. Joint Senior 






The Eighties 


Hawkins, piano 


8 15 p.m Senior 


Haupen Barliefd 


7008845pm 


Recital. Stephen 






Lecture Series. 


EDMR 


Recital Rose Anne 


soprano. Cindy Hall 


Quad Flix ANNIE 


Yang, piano & Cindy 






AnneF Scott. 




Bowden. piano. 


flute. 8 Mark Pana 


HALL and 


Hutton, violin Reh 






Searle Conf. Center 




EDMR. 


piano. EDMR. 


SLEEPER Page 


Hall. MDBBidg 










9:30 p.m. Freewater 
Films FILM'S 

MODERN TIMES 
Bio. Sci 




$1.50 
8:15 p.m. Duke 
Players TOYS IN 
THE ATTIC 
Branson. $3. 8 $4 



2T 

10:55 a.m. Chapel. 
The Reverend B 
Maurice Ritchie 

4 30 A 8 OOP m 
Opera Workshop 
John Hanks. Dir 
Reh Hall. MDB 
Bldg. 

6:00pm Opera 
Workshop Supper 
Terrace MDB Bldg 

7 00pm Quad. Flix. 



28 

7008900 pm 

Quad. Flix 
AGATHA Page 

$1 50 
8 15 pm Faculty 

Recital Mary 

Turner, piano. 



29 



30 



FINAL EXAMS BEGIN 7 00 8 9 45 pn 

7:00 8 9 30 A M Quad Quad Fn. 

Flix MOON- SUPERMAN 

RAKER ' Page. Page $1 50 



8:15 p.m. Ouke 
Players TOYSIN 
THE ATTIC 
Branson $3 8 $4. 



ABBA EBAN SPEAKS ON 
'THE MIDDLE EAST PEACE PROCESS" 

Abba Eban, former Foreign Minister, Ambassador 
to the United States, Chief Delegate to the United Na- 
tions from Israel, and author of The Middle East in 
World Politics will speak on "The Middle East Peace 
Process" on Thursday, April 10th, at 8:00 p.m. in Page 
Auditorium. He will be sponsored by Duke University 
Hillel Foundation and the Duke University Union's 
Major Speaker's Committee. The co-sponsors are the 
Department of Judaic Studies, the Department of Po- 
litical Science, Duke-UNC International Security Af- 
fairs Seminar, Durham-Chapel Hill Jewish Federation, 
and the Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs. 
A limited number of tickets (500), priced at $5.00 gen- 
eral admission, will be available to the community be- 
ginning Wednesday, March 12th at Page Box Office. 
Student tickets, priced $1.50, will go on sale Thursday, 
April 3rd. If there are any remaining seats as of Mon- 
day, April 7th, they will become available to the com- 
munity. Tickets, with checks payable to Duke Univer- 
sity, may also be purchased by mail order to Page Box 
Office, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N. C. 27706. 
Please enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope for 
ticket return. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC LECTURE 
PROFESSOR SIEGFRIED KROSS 

Professor Siegfried Kross of the University of Bonn 
will present a lecture on "Brahms, the Symphonist" 
for the Department of Music in Room 104 of the Mary 
Duke Biddle Music Building on Friday April 4th at 4 
o'clock p.m. 



Refreshments will be served following Professor 
Kross's lecture. The public is invited to this lecture for 
which there is no charge. 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES IN 
MAY COMMENCEMENT 

A memorandum to each candidate for a degree to be 
conferred on May 11, 1980, was mailed from the Office 
of the University Marshal on March the 3rd. This 
memorandum gave directions for reserving academic 
apparel, an order of events for the Commencement 
Weekend, and information about the procuring of en- 
graved invitations and tickets. Any degree candidate 
not receiving the memorandum should consult im- 
mediately the Office of the University Marshal, 353 
Gross Chemical Laboratory, (684-6029), to be certain 
that a diploma has been ordered and that the office has 
an address for a second mailing in April. 

DUKE HOMESITES— HOUSES FOR SALE 

Only those homes located on lots originally de- 
veloped and sold by the University and which are still 
owned by a member of the faculty or staff of the Uni- 
versity will be listed in the University Calendar. Call 
Fred E. Miller at extension 2054 for information re- 
garding listings. Call the appropriate number listed 
below for information regarding a particular house. 
Location: 2404 Prince Street 
Phone: 489-7577 
Number of Bedrooms: Six (6) 
Number of Baths: Three (3) 
Type of heating/air conditioning: Oil Heat, Central Air 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR 




March 30-April 6, 1980 



' Volume 79 



Published March 28, 1980 



Number 24 



Sunday, March 30 (PALM SUNDAY) 

March 28th-30th Department of Romance Languages of Duke and 
UNC-Chapel Hill and the Program of Medieval and Renais- 
sance Studies of Duke are co-sponsoring an International 
Symposium on Montaigne, to commemorate the quadricen- 
tennial publication of the Essais (1580). 
Through April 3rd D. U. U. Galleries Exhibit: Works by Betty 

Oliver. East Gallery. East Campus Library. 
Through April 24th DUU Galleries Art Exhibit: Dollhouse Invita- 
tional. West Campus Gallery. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. New Games Festival Workshop. 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

9:30 a.m. International Symposium on Montaigne. Speaker: Eva 
Kushner. McGill Univ. "Dialogue et monologue dans les 
deux premiers livres des Essais." UNC-Chapel Hill, Toy 
Lounge, Dey Hall. 
10:45 a.m. International Symposium on Montaigne. Speaker: 
Donald Frame. Columbia Univ. "But What Are Essays? 
Montaigne Read in 1580. " UNC-Chapel Hill, Toy Lounge, 
Dey Hall. 
10:55 a.m. (PALM SUNDAY) University Service of Worship Uni- 
versity Chapel. Preacher: Bishop James Armstrong. Resident 
Bishop, The Dakotas Area, The United Methodist Church, 
Aberdeen. South Dakota. The Service of Worship is Broad- 
cast over WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. ETHNIC CULTURE DAY. East Campus 

Quad in front of Baldwin Aud. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room. East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults; Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room. West Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

1:00-4:30 p.m. THE GREEK GAMES: East Campus. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Clemson Univ. 

2:00-4:00 p.m. NEW GAMES FESTIVAL. Residential Quad. 
West Campus. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

4:00 p.m. Duke Chapel Choir and Orchestra present Bach's "ST. 
MATTHEW PASSION." $3.00 Performance and $10.00 
Performance/Buffet. Duke Chapel. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center. 505 Alex- 
ander. A light supper is served following the service. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "BREAKING AWAY." 
Immensely appealing and unusual. Four townies looked 
down upon by Indiana University college students face class 
barriers, frustrating futures — and the Little 500 bicycle race 
Entertaining performances, bright dialogue, exciting cycling 
sequences. Stars Dennis Christopher, Paul Dooley, Barbara 
Barrie. Dir. Peter Yates. PG. Page. $1.50. 

Monday, March 31 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Thomas College. 

4:00 p.m. Faculty Discussion Session. Divinity School Commons 

Rm. 
4:15 p.m. Department of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Howard 

Berg. Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. 
5:00 p.m. Faculty Sherry Hour. Rare Book Room Perkins Library. 



5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist, Episcopal. Memorial Chapel. Duke 

Chapel. 
7:00, 8:45. & 10:30 p.m. PsiUps Movie: "Student Teachers." Bio. 

Sci. $1.50. 
8:00-10:00 p.m. Open House Exhibit of Harpsichords and Viola Da 

Gambas. Lower Level, MD Biddle Bldg. Open to public. 

Free. 
8:00 p.m. The Duke University Student Symposium. Gross Chem. 
8:15 p.m. Senior Recital: Lee Ann Cheves. soprano: Kathryn 

Huestis, piano. EDMR. Public is invited. Free. 

Tuesday, April 1 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:00 a.m. Institute for Learning in Retirement Coffee Hour with 

Dr. Noel Brown. Public is invited. East Campus Center. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:10 p.m. Forest Protection Seminar. Speakers: Peter Ruzsa and 

David Conklin. Rm. 202 Bio. Sci. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. The Department of Anatomy and The University Pro- 
gram in Genetics Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Fotis Kafatos. Rm. 
147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics and Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Ms. 
Lucinda McDade. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. 

3:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Davidson. 

3:00 p.m. International Studies Lecture Series. Speaker: Dr. Noel 
Brown. 2101 Campus Dr. 

3:30 p.m. Department of Microbiology and Immunology Second 
Annual Jim McGinnis Memorial Lecture. Speaker: Dr. Lee 
Hood. Rm. 143 Jones Bldg. 

4:30 p.m. Duke Institute For Learning In Retirement "Great Deci- 
sion '80" Lecture Series. Speaker: John E. Fobes. Gross 
Chem. 

4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Eucharist. Duke Chapel Crypt. 

7:00 & 10:00 p.m. Freewater Films: "EFFI BRIEST." Dir. by 
Rainer Werner Fassbinder. Stars Hanna Schygulla. An ele- 
gant adaptation of Theodor Fontane's classic novel, a Ger- 
man equivalent of Madame Bovary. that describes the op- 
pression through marriage of a vivacious teenage girl. The 
film both recreates the 19th century and offers a modern 
reanalysis of fascism and the oppression of women. Bio. Sci. 
Duke Undergrads w ID Free; Others $1.50. 

7:00 & 10:00 p.m. Newman Center Movie: "GREATEST STORY 
EVER TOLD." Gross Chem. $1.00. 

8:00 p.m. Erasmus Club/Philological Club Joint Lecture. Speaker: 
Prof. Ronald Witt. Toy Faculty Lounge of Dey Hall, near 
Wilson Library. UNC. 

Wednesday. April 2 

8:00 a.m. -8:15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:00 a.m. Coffee-Reception in School of Forestry and Environ- 
mental Studies for Dr. Noel Brown. Visiting UN Environ- 
mental Advisor. Students and faculty of Forestry and En- 
vironmental Studies. Botany. Zoology, and Geology are in- 
vited. 



11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30-1:30 p.m. Department of Education Spring Symposium. 

Speaker: William Self. Rm. 202 West Duke Building. 
2:00 p.m. MENS TENNIS: Duke vs. Univ. of Maryland. 
2:00 p.m. WOMEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. U. of Tenn.- 

Chattanooga. 
3:00 p.m. DUKE LACROSSE: Duke vs. UMBC 
3:30 p.m. Canadian Studies Center Seminar. Speaker: Prof. John 

R. Hofley. Home of Joel Smith, #4 Stoneridge Circle. 
4:00 p.m. Department of Anatomy Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Malcom 

Johnston. Rm. 273 Sands Bldg. 
4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 

the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 
5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist, Episcopal. Memorial Chapel. Duke 

Chapel. 
7:00 & 10:00 p.m. House G Movie: "Funny Girl.'' Bio. Sci. 
7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services Program: John Osborne. 

Songs, Guitar and Poetry. Main Lobby, Hosp. Free. 
8:15 p.m. DUKE UNIVERSITY WIND SYMPHONY STU- 
DENT RECITAL. EDMR. Free. Open to the public. 

Thursday, April 3 

April 3rd-12th DUKE JEWISH ARTS FESTIVAL. 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

10:30 a.m. Jewish Arts Festival Lecture. Speaker: Jonathan Kre- 
mer. Rm. 219 Social Science. 

11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 
Community. York Chapel. 

12:00 Noon Junior Recital: Dan Via, Contrabassist: Mark Parta. 
piano. Reh. Hall MD Biddle Music Bldg. Public is invited. 
Free. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

3:00 p.m. Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs Colloquia. 
Speaker: Jerry Bruno. 201 Flowers Lounge. Union Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Physiology Department Seminar. Speaker: Kai S. Lee. 
Ph.D. Rm. 385 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

4:00-7:00 p.m. Jewish Arts Festival: Hebrew Calligraphy 
Workshop — Jonathan Kremer. 

4:45 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Student Center. 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00 p.m. Freewater Films: 'DUCK SOUP." Dir. by Leo 
McCarey. Stars The Marx Brothers. Arguably the Brothers' 
best film, and certainly their most anarchic. Groucho is Rufus 
T. Firefly, King of Freedonia, Harpo and Chico are interna- 
tional spies, and Zeppo is generally left out. Plus: "TILLIES 
PUNCTURED ROMANCE." Dir. by Mack Sennett. Stars 
Charlie Chaplin, Marie Dressier, Mabel Normand, The 
Keystone Kops. The first feature length comedy produced. 
Though faded somewhat with time, it still seems worth 
watching if only because Chaplin appears out of his famous 
tramp character. Silent with music score. Bio. Sci. Duke Un- 
dergrads w/ID Free: Others $1.50. 

7:30 p.m. (MAUNDAY THURSDAY) University Service of Wor- 
ship. University Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Juanita B 
Wright. 

7:30 p.m. Meeting of Amnesty International for the Duke/Durham 
Chapter. Rm. 307 Perkins. 

8:00 p.m. Jewish Arts Festival Lecture. Speaker: Jonathan Kre- 
mer. Rm. 219 Social Science 

9:00 p.m. Duke Jewish Arts Festival Film: "EXODUS." Stars 
Paul Newman. The turbulent month— of 1947 when desperate 
emigrees were prevented by the British from reaching the 
land of their dreams, Israel, and when the Israeli underground 
was battling British and Arabs alike in their desperate strug- 
gle for life, independence and the chance to bring the age-old 
Jewish nation back to life again in the Holy Land. Gross 
Chem. Free. 

9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "SHERLOCK JR." and DUCK 
SOUP." "Sherlock Jr." Dir. by and stars Buster Keaton. 
This short feature demonstrates the Keaton genius for film 



comedy innovation. Buster explores the world of film as he 
plays a film projectionist who falls asleep and dreams he is in 
the film he's running. Silent. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID 
Free: Others $1.50. 

Friday, April 4 

8:00 a.m. -8: 15 a.m. Prayer Service (Special Lenten Emphasis) by 
the Worship Committee of the Divinity School. York Chapel. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:00 Noon Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 

01 1 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Craig Martin. Rm. 144 

Biological Sciences Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Department of Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Martha 
M. Howe. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

2:00 p.m. MEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. Appalachian. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Dept. Seminar. Speaker: Dr. F. Bickelhaupt. 
Rm. 103 Gross Chem. Lab. 

4:00 p.m. Department of Music Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Siegfried 
Kross. Rm. 104 MD Biddle Music Bldg. Public is invited. 
Free. 

4:00 p.m. John J. Gergen Memorial Lecture. Speaker: James 
Glimm. Room 113 Physics Bldg. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Student Center, 505 Alexander Ave. 

7:00, 9:30, & 12:00 Midnight Freewater Films: "THE LAST 
WALTZ." Dir. by Martin Scorsese. Stars The Band. Bob 
Dylan, Joni Mitchell. Eric Clapton. Neil Young, many others. 
Great music and interviews with The Band say it all in this 
rock-concert movie — perhaps the best ever made — of The 
Band's final performance at San Francisco's Winterland in 
1976. Rated PG. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free: 
Others $1.50. 

7:00 p.m. Services & 8:00 p.m. Dancing. Israeli Dancing to follow 
Friday evening Shabbat services. 

8:15 p.m. STUDENTS OF LOREN WITHERS PIANO RE- 
CITAL. EDMR. Free. Open to Public. 

8:30 p.m. Hoof n' Horn presents "FIDDLER ON THE ROOF." 
Page Aud. Tickets $4. $5, and $6 Reserved Seating at Page 
Box Office. 

Saturday, April 5 

April 5th-May 12th DUU Galleries Art Exhibit: Student Juried 
Show. East Gallery. 

9:30 a.m. The Seventh Southeastern Mathematical Physics Semi- 
nar. Rm. 113 Physics Bldg. 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

10:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m. Volunteers For Youth Field Day. 

10:30 a.m. Freewater Films: "THE PHANTOM TOLLBOOTH." 
(Children) Dir. by David Monahan. Chuck Jones, Abe 
Levitow. Voices of Hans Conried, Mel Blanc, etc. A day- 
dreaming youngster takes an amusing journey to a cartoon 
fantasy world of words, sounds, letters, music. Based on 
Norman Juster's well known book. Gross Chem. Duke Un- 
dergrads w ID Free; Others $1.50. 

2:00 p.m. DUKE LACROSSE: Duke vs. Delaware. 

5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

8:15 p.m. Chamber Arts Society: RECITAL BY MICHAEL AND 
BEVERIDGE WEBSTER. EDMR. $6. 

8:30 p.m. Hoof n' Horn presents "FIDDLER ON THE ROOF. 
Page Aud. Tickets S4. $5. and $6 Reserved Seating at Page 
Box Office. 

Sunday, April 6 

6:00 a.m. EASTER SUNRISE SERVICE. Duke Gardens. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. C. G. Newsome, Assistant Professor 
of American Christianity, Divinity School. 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

9:00 & 11:00 a.m. EASTER University Service of Worship. (Iden- 
tical Services) University Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend 
Robert T. Young. The Service of Worship is Broadcast over 
WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
1 1:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: '/i price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 



11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room. West Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours 

2:00 p.m. MEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. Clemson Univ. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00, 7:00, & 9:00 p.m. (SPECIAL EASTER MATINEEl Quad- 
rangle Pictures: "THE MUPPET MOVIE. The fabulous 
Muppets joyously brought to the screen. The Muppets are 
wonderfully enchanting as they head for Hollywood to be- 
come stars. Stars Kermit the Frog, Miss Piggy, and the gang. 
plus all-star live cast. Dir. James Frawley. Page. $1.50. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist. Episcopal. Episcopal Student Center. 
505 Alexander Avenue. 

8:00 p.m. Jewish Arts Festival: The Art of Jewish Mime — Sasha 
Nanus. $1. Gen. Admission. Available at Page Box Office. 
EDMR. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for S3. 50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of April 6th- April 13 th 
is Monday, March 31st, before 1:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 

For the future please note the deadline for the 
Calendar of April 13th-April 20th is Friday, April 4th, 
before 1:00 p.m. due to University Holiday on Mon- 
day. April 7th. 



NEW GAMES FESTIVAL 

The New Games Foundation, based in California, 
has contracted with Project WILD to send 2 trainers to 
Duke for 2 days, Saturday, March 29th, and Sunday, 
March 30th. These trainers will run a 2 day workshop 
for 60 students and faculty members interested in 
learning how to teach or "referee" new games to 
others. The sessions will run from about 9 a.m. -5 p.m. 
on both days, with some optional films or presenta- 
tions in the evenings. 



On Sunday, March 30th. from 2-4 p.m., a New 
Games Festival will take place on the residential quad 
of West Campus. The public is cordially invited to 
come and share in a time of fun and play. Using these 
60 newly trained referees as a core, a day-long New 
Games Festival is being planned for Saturday, April 
26th. This festival will be open to the entire Duke 
community, and will be held on the East Campus 
grounds, both on Hanes field and on the main east 
quad. 

Are you ready for Prui. Hug Tag, Frisbee Golf. 
Hunker Hauser, The Lap Game or Blob? A New 
Games Festival is a way for everybody in our commu- 
nity to have fun and get to know each other better, by 
playing together. At a New Games Festival you can 
play games you never heard of, replay some of your 
old favorites, or invent your own game and share it 
with everyone else. What's "new" about New Games 
is the way we play together, just for the fun of it! Bring 
your games, your family and friends, and lots of 
energy. Wear old clothes and sneakers, and be pre- 
pared for a lot of fun. Sponsored by Project WILD, 
ASDU, Residential Federations, and Wilson house. 

ETHNIC CULTURE DAY 

Come one, come all to Duke Ethnic Culture Day 
sponsored by the International Association and 
Black' White Relations Group. Come join us on East 
Campus Quad in front of Baldwin Auditorium for 
ethnic food and entertainment. Take a break from the 
books for a fun-filled day on Sunday, March 30th from 
11:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. Everyone welcome! 

DUKE CHAPEL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA 
PRESENT BACH'S "ST. MATHEW PASSION" 
THE PASSION OF OUR LORD ACCORDING TO 
ST. MATTHEW by Johann Sebastian Bach will be 
performed in Duke Chapel on Sunday, March 30th at 
4:00 p.m. It will be presented in two sessions with an 
intermission for dinner. 

Tickets priced at $3.00 are available at Page Box 
Office or by writing PASSION, Box 4822 Duke Sta- 
tion, Durham, NC 27706. Be sure to state the number 
of tickets desired and enclose a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope for ticket return. Please make 
checks payable to Duke University. Mail orders will 
be accepted through March 20. 

A buffet dinner will be served at intermission. Tick- 
ets for the performance and buffet are priced at $10.00 
and must be purchased in advance. 

Featured with the 180-member Duke Chapel Choir 
and 30-member orchestra will be soloists Marsha An- 
drews, soprano: Cynthia Donnell. alto; Michael Best, 
tenor: and Wayne Lail. bass. The role of the 
Evangelist will be sung by Joseph Blanton and Jesus 
will be sung by Donald Boothman. Instrumental solo- 
ists will include Margaret Johnston on viola da gamba 
and Michael and Lois Schultz on oboe d'amore. The 
35-member Durham Boys Choir will also be featured. 
Mr. J. Benjamin Smith, Director of Chapel Music, will 
conduct the performance. 



INFORMAL DISCUSSION SESSION 
FOR FACULTY 

On Monday, March 31st. Provost William Bevan 
and Chancellor A. Kenneth Pye will host an informal 
discussion session for members of the faculty. It will 
be held from 4:00-5:00 p.m. in the Commons Room of 
the Divinity School where coffee will be served. After 
the discussion, the group will adjourn to the Rare Book 
Room in Perkins Library for a sherry hour. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, March 31st, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Howard Berg, 
California Institute of Technology, will speak on "The 
Physics a Bacterium Needs to Know." Coffee and tea 
will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

OPEN HOUSE EXHIBIT OF 
HARPSICHORDS AND VIOLA DA GAMBAS 

On Monday evening, March 31st, from 8:00-10:00 
p.m. there will be an Open House exhibit of 
harpsichords and viola da gambas made by Keith Hill 
of Michigan on the lower level of the Mary Duke Bid- 
die Music Building. Everyone is invited. Admission is 
free. 

THE DUKE UNIVERSITY 
STUDENT SYMPOSIUM 

The Duke University Student Symposium — "Facing 
the 80's: Changing Attitudes Toward A Duke Educa- 
tion," sponsored by the ASDU Academic Affairs 
Committee, will be held at 8:00 p.m. on Monday, 
March 31st, in Gross Chemistry Auditorium. Three 
papers were chosen out of those submitted, each of 
whose thesis involves some aspect of the subject of the 
symposium. The authors of these three papers will be 
awarded a $100.00 honorarium and will present their 
thesis at the Symposium during which Dr. Guttman, 
Chairman of the UFCAS Curriculum Committee, will 
moderate. The three winners are Chris Hest, David 
Mercer, and Harsha Murthy. A discussion session will 
be held after the presentation of the three papers and 
everyone is invited to participate. 

SENIOR RECITAL 
LEE ANN CHEVES 

Lee Ann Cheves, soprano, will give her Senior Re- 
cital on Monday evening, March 31st, at 8:15 p.m. in 
the East Duke Music Room. Ms. Cheves. who has 
sung with the D. U. Chorale, the Durham Savoyards, 
the D. U. Opera Workshop under the direction of John 
Hanks and Duke*s Hoof *n' Horn, will be accom- 
panied by Kathryn Huestis on piano. The public is 
invited to this recital for which there is no charge. 

The program follows: 

Recitative & Aria — With verdure clad Josef Haydn 

the fields appear 
from The Creation 



Hugo Wolf 



Douglas Stuart Moore 



Claude Debussy 



Robert Ward 



AUeluja 



from the Motet — Exsultate. jubilate 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 



Mausfallen Spriichlein 
Verschwiegene Liebe 
Der Knabe und das Immlein 
Das verlassene Magdelein 
Er ist's 
Two Arias 

from "The Ballard of Baby Doe" 
Willow 

Always through the changing 
Lias Recitative and Aria 
from V Enfant Prodigue 

Romance 
Green 

Colloque sentimental 
Fantoches 

Two Songs 

from "Sacred Songs for Pantheists" 
Heaven Haven 
Pied Beauty 



FOREST PROTECTION SEMINAR 

The School of Forestry and Environmental Studies 
will present a Forest Protection Seminar on Tuesday, 
April 1st, at 12:10 p.m. in Room 202 Biological Sci- 
ences. Peter Ruzsa will describe "Red Mud Ameliora- 
tion" and David Conklin will discuss "Studies of 
Stereum." 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY AND 

THE UNIVERSITY PROGRAM 

IN GENETICS SEMINAR 

Dr. Fotis Kafatos, Cellular and Developmental 
Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mas- 
sachusetts, will speak on "Organization and Evolution 
of the Developmentally Regulated Chorion Multi-Gene 
Families" for the Department of Anatomy and the 
University Program in Genetics Seminar on Tuesday, 
April 1st, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 147 of the Nanaline H. 
Duke Building. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS AND 
EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

On Tuesday, April 1st, at 12:30 p.m.. Room 130 
Biological Sciences Building, Ms. Lucinda McDade 
will speak on "Systematics and reproductive biology 
of the thirteen species of the Aphelandra pulcherrima 
complex in Central America." Ms. McDade will report 
on extensive field work in Central America: the topic 
is the subject of her doctoral dissertation in Botany. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 
PRESENTS NOEL BROWN OF UN 

Dr. Noel Brown, Director, New York Liaison Office 
and Special Assistant to the Executive Director, UN 
Environmental Program, will be at Duke March 31st- 
April 2nd under the auspices of the Center for Interna- 
tional Studies and the Center for Resource and En- 
vironmental Policy Research, Public Speakers Series 
directed by Professor Gerald R. Stairs. His visit has 
been arranged by the Fellows Program of the Execu- 
tive Council on Foreign Diplomats. Dr. Brown is an 
expert on natural resource allocations. North-South 
4 relationships and Third World roles in international 



development. He will meet with the Institute for 
Learning in Retirement at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, 
April 1st for a Coffee Hour in the East Campus Center. 
The public is invited to attend. Dr. Brown will speak to 
students and faculty on "Third World Responses to 
Environmental Problems" at 3:00 p.m.. Tuesday, 
April 1st, at the Center for International Studies. 2101 
Campus Drive. 

DEPARTMENT OF MICROBIOLOGY AND 

IMMUNOLOGY SECOND ANNUAL 

JIM McGINNIS MEMORIAL LECTURE 

Dr. Lee Hood, Division of Biology, California In- 
stitute of Technology, will speak on "Antibodies: Split 
Genes and Jumping Genes" for the Department of 
Microbiology and Immunology Second Annual Jim 
McGinnis Memorial Lecture on Tuesday. April 1st. at 
3:30 p.m. in Room 143 of the Jones Building. A recep- 
tion for the McGinnis Family, Dr. Hood and members 
of the Department will be held following the lecture. 

DUKE INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING 

IN RETIREMENT 

"GREAT DECISION 80" LECTURE SERIES 

The third lecture in the Great Decisions '80 
Lecture/Discussion Series will be given Tuesday, 
April 1st, at 4:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Gross 
Chemistry Building. "Great Decisions" is sponsored 
by the Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement with 
a grant from the North Carolina Humanities Commit- 
tee. 

John E. Fobes, Deputy Director, General retired. 
UNESCO, now Associate University Scholar and Ad- 
visor on International Corporation, will address the 
issue of the United Nations in today's world. 

ERASMUS CLUB/PHILOLOGICAL CLUB 

JOINT LECTURE 

PROFESSOR RONALD WITT 

The annual joint meeting of Duke's Erasmus Club 
and the Philological Club of UNC will be held in 
Chapel Hill this year on Tuesday, April 1st at 8:00 p.m. 
in the Toy Faculty Lounge of Dey Hall, near Wilson 
Library. The speaker will be Professor Ronald Witt of 
the Duke History Department, who has chosen the 
topic "Early Italian Humanism and the Mediaeval 
Literary Tradition." Everyone is cordially invited to 
attend. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
SPRING SYMPOSIUM 

William Self, Dean, School of Education, University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will speak on "Edu- 
cation in the Eighties" for the Department of Educa- 
tion Spring Symposium on Wednesday, April 2nd. 
from 12:30 p.m. -1:30 p.m. in Room 202 West Duke 
Building. 

CANADIAN STUDIES CENTER SEMINAR 

Professor John R. Hofley will speak on his study of 
John Porter's vision of Canada and its impact on 



Canadian Social Science for the Canadian Studies 
Center Seminar on Wednesday, April 2nd, at 3:30 p.m. 
at the home of Joel Smith, #4 Stoneridge Circle. Call 
684-2915 early Tuesday, April 1st, for directions and 
further information. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY SEMINAR 

Dr. Malcolm Johnston, Professor of Anatomy, 
U.N.C. School of Medicine, Professor of Orthodon- 
tics, U.N.C. School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, North 
Carolina, will speak on "Mechanisms of Normal and 
Abnormal Embryonic Craniofacial Development" for 
the Department of Anatomy Seminar on Wednesday, 
April 2nd, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 273 of the Sands 
Building. Coffee and cookies will be served at 3:45 
p.m. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY WIND SYMPHONY 
STUDENT RECITAL 

Students of the Duke University Wind Symphony 
will present a recital of solo and small ensemble music 
on Wednesday evening, April 2nd, at 8:15 p.m. in the 
East Duke Music Room. This program is open to the 
public without charge. 

DUKE JEWISH ARTS FESTIVAL 

A unique cultural event is scheduled for April 3rd- 
12th at Duke University: The Jewish Arts Festival. 
This ten day long Festival will bring to the Triangle 
community artists, artisans, performers, and work- 
shops in exploration of the questions: "What is Jewish 
Art?" and "Is there something distinctive that defines 
the Jewish artist?" 

The Festival, sponsored by the Duke Hillel Founda- 
tion and incorporating programs of other campus 
sponsors, will be the first event of its kind in the 
Triangle area. It will include a wide range of different 
art forms including Mime — Ms. Sasha Nanus: Israeli 
Folk Music — The Parvarim; Hebrew Cal- 
ligraphy—Mr. Jonathan Kremer; Theatre — Fiddler on 
the Roof; Lecture — Mr. Abba Eban; Israeli Contem- 
porary Painting — Ms. Miriam Naaman; Film — 
Exodus, and many other exciting events. 

The Jewish Arts Festival begins on Thursday, April 
3rd with an opening workshop and lectures by visiting 
Hebrew calligrapher Jonathan Kremer, one of Bos- 
ton's leading young calligraphers, who will offer an 
intensive workshop on Hebrew calligraphy. No previ- 
ous calligraphy experience is required, however regis- 
tration is limited to 15. The workshop will be held on 
Thursday from 4:00-7:00 p.m. and those interested 
may register by calling 942-4057. On Thursday even- 
ing. Mr. Kremer will offer a slide-lecture on "De- 
velopment and Illumination of Ketubot" (Jewish wed- 
ding documents) at 8:00 p.m. in Social Science, Rm. 
219. He concludes his visit on Friday morning with a 
lecture on "The Illuminated Hebrew Manuscript" at 
10:30 a.m. in Social Science, Rm. 219. 

Also on Thursday, April 3rd the film "Exodus" will 
be shown in Gross Chem. Auditorium at 9:00 p.m. 



Admission is free and tickets are available at Page Box 
Office. "Exodus," focuses on the turbulent months of 
1947 when desperate emigrees were prevented by the 
British from reaching Israel, and when the Israeli un- 
derground was battling British and Arabs alike in their 
struggle for life and statehood. 

The Hoof n' Horn production of "Fiddler on the 
Roof" is scheduled for Friday, April 4th and Saturday, 
April 5th at 8:30 p.m. at Page Auditorium. 

On Sunday evening, April 6th, the Festival will host 
a one-woman performance by Jewish mime Sasha 
Nanus. Ms. Nanus will present a program on "The Art 
of Jewish Mime" which will be extremely wide 
ranging — "From Eve in the Garden of Eden, to a 
Female Soldier in the Israeli Army . . . she speaks an 
unspoken language of movement and expression that 
people of all ages the world over can understand." The 
performance is at 8:00 p.m. in the East Duke Music 
Room and $1.00 general admission tickets are avail- 
able at Page Box Office and at the door. 

Israel's famous folk duo. The Parvarim, considered 
by many as Israel's Simon and Garfunkel, will come to 
Page Auditorium on Tuesday, April 8th at 8:15 p.m. 
Their distinctive folk repertoire includes selections in 
Hebrew, English, Yiddish, Ladino, Greek and 
Spanish. However, the rich harmonies, superb guitar 
playing and unique arrangements of the Parvarim bear 
witness most of all to the mystique and magic of their 
birthplace, the Middle East. General admission tickets 
are $3.00 for community and $2.00 for students and are 
available at Page Box Office. A free mini-concert will 
be offered on Tuesday afternoon as a foretaste of the 
evenings performance. Check with Duke Hillel at 
942-4057 for more information. 

Israeli contemporary painter Miriam Naaman will 
exhibit her works beginning Wednesday, April 9th and 
closing on April 1 1th in Flowers Lounge. There will be 
an opening reception with the artist on Wednesday 
evening at 8:30 p.m. at which Ms. Naaman will discuss 
her paintings. Along with her paintings, the works of 
local craftsman Rabbi Ephraim Rosenzweig will be 
exhibited. His hand crafted mezuzot and other pieces 
explore the meaning of traditional forms of Jewish 
arts. The exhibit will be open from 10:00 a.m. -8:00 
p.m. Wednesday through Friday. 

Distinguished Israeli statesman, Abba Eban will 
speak in Page Auditorium on Thursday, April 10th at 
8:00 p.m. on "The Middle East Peace Process." Tick- 
ets, available at Page Box Office, are $5.00 for com- 
munity and $1.50 for students. 

The Jewish Arts Festival closes on Friday, April 
1 lth and Saturday, April 12th. On Friday, the Festival 
will sponsor several booths at the annual Duke Uni- 
versity Union's Springfest including works of Jewish 
artisans and Jewish foods. On Saturday night at 9:00 
p.m. the student-led Festival concludes with an Israeli 
Coffee House in Few Federation Lounge which will 
include local performers in an Israeli setting. The Fes- 
tival is planned by students involved in the Duke Hillel 
Foundation and is an impressive testimony to their 
creativity. Funds for this program are provided by 
Hillel along with the Durham-Chapel Hill Jewish Fed- 



eration, Greater Carolinas Association of Rabbis, 
ASDU, the Bassett Fund, and the Duke University 
Union. Further information at 942-4057. 

JUNIOR RECITAL BY 
DAN VIA, CONTRAB ASSIST 

Dan Via, a Music and Religion major, will give his 
junior contrabass recital on Thursday, April 3rd, at 
12:00 Noon in the Rehearsal Hall of the Mary Duke 
Biddle Music Building on the East Campus. He will be 
assisted by pianist, Mark Parta. The public is invited to 
this recital for which there is no admission charge. 

The program will include the Sonata #2 in F Major 
by A. Vivaldi: 4 Movements from Cello Suite #3 by 
J. S. Bach: Chanson Triste by S. Koussevitsky; Valse 
Miniature by S. Koussevitsky; and Sonata in D. 
Major by G. P. Telemann. 

THE INSTITUTE OF POLICY SCIENCES 
AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS COLLOQUIA 

Jerry Bruno, key political operative and "advance 
man" for Presidents John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. 
Johnson, and Presidential candidates Robert F. Ken- 
nedy and Hubert H. Humphrey, will discuss "Insights 
in Presidential Elections — From Kennedy to Carter" 
before a colloquium on policy analysis beginning at 
3:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 3rd, in 201 Flowers 
Lounge of the Union Building. 

PHYSIOLOGY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Kai S. Lee, Ph.D., of the Department of Physiology 
and Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical 
School, Galveston, Texas will speak on "Sodium Cur- 
rent in Single Heart Muscle Cell of Adult Rats" for the 
Department of Physiology Seminar on Thursday, April 
3rd, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 385 Nanaline H. Duke 
Building. Coffee and Cookies will be served at 3:45 
p.m. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Craig Martin. Graduate Student, Botany Depart- 
ment, will speak on "Field and Laboratory Studies of 
Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in the Epiphyte 77/- 
landsia Usneoides (Spanish Moss). II. Growth and 
Carbon Dioxide Exchange" for the Plant Ecology 
Seminar on Friday, April 4th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 
144 Biological Sciences Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

Martha M. Howe, Associate Professor of Bacteriol- 
ogy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. 
will speak on "Jumping Genes — How Do They Jump? 
Studies With Bacteriophage MU" for the Department 
of Biochemistry Seminar on Friday, April 4th, at 12:30 
p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee 
will be served at 12:15 p.m. in the lobby. 

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 
Dr. F. Bickelhaupt from the Vrije University, 
Amsterdam will present a seminar entitled "pir Hy- 
fi bridization with Phosphorus and Arsenic" on Friday, 



April 4th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 103 Gross Chemical 
Laboratory. Refreshments will be served in the Lobby 
at 3:10 p.m. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC LECTURE 
PROFESSOR SIEGFRIED KROSS 

Professor Siegfried Kross of the University of Bonn 
will present a lecture on "Brahms, the Symphonist" 
for the Department of Music in Room 104 of the Mary 
Duke Biddle Music Building on Friday, April 4th, at 
4:00 p.m. Refreshments will be served following Pro- 
fessor Kross's lecture. The public is invited to this 
lecture for which there is no charge. 

Professor Kross is the editor of Telemann's instru- 
mental concertos and Beethoven's Diabelli Variations, 
Piano Quintet, and Piano Quartet, for the collected 
editions of those composers' works. He has published 
on subjects as diverse as the Protestant chorale, 
Beethoven's sketchbooks, the biographies of Bruch 
and Schumann, and Brahms's choral works. His con- 
tributions to the history of culture include essays on 
Telemann and the Enlightenment and on the "musi- 
cal" structure of Thomas Mann's Doctor Faustus. 

JOHN J. GERGEN MEMORIAL LECTURE 

James Glimm of the Rockefeller University will de- 
liver the eleventh John J. Gergen Memorial Lecture on 
"Problems in Partial Differential Equations which re- 
late to the Production of Petroleum" for the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics on Friday, April 4th at 4:00 p.m. 
in Room 113 Physics Building. 

STUDENTS OF LOREN WITHERS 
PIANO RECITAL 

Students of Loren Withers will be presented in a 
piano recital on Friday, April 4th, at 8:15 p.m. in the 
East Duke Music Room. This program is open to the 
public without charge. 

"FIDDLER ON THE ROOF" 

Hoof 'n' Horn, the oldest student musical theatre 
group in the South, is proud to present the hit Broad- 
way musical "Fiddler On The Roof" on Friday, April 
4th, Saturday, April 5th, and Friday, May 9th at 8:30 
p.m. in Page Auditorium. At 8:30 p.m. Saturday, May 
10th, there will be a special performance of this 
touching musical reserved especially for the family and 
friends of the Class of 1980. 

"Fiddler On The Roof" marks the seventeenth an- 
nual Hoof 'n' Horn Spring production of a Broadway 
show following over thirty years of original student 
written musicals. It is one of the classical Broadway 
musicals, telling the story of Tevye, the Dairyman, and 
of his family and friends in their peasant village 
Anatevka on the eve of the Russian revolutionary 
period. Theatre-goers will remember such wonderful 
songs as "Tradition," "Matchmaker," "Sunrise, 
Sunset," and "If I Were a Rich Man." 

Tickets for the April 4th, April 5th, and May 9th 
performances are now on sale at Page Box Office be- 



tween the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. for $4, $5, 
and $6 Reserved Seating. Tickets for the May 10th 
performance will go on sale April 7th for the general 
public. Master Charge or Visa purchases are available 
over the phone between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 
3:00 p.m. at 684-3227. 

THE SEVENTH SOUTHEASTERN 
MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS SEMINAR 

The Seventh Southeastern Mathematical Physics 
Seminar will be held on Saturday. April 5th in Room 
113 Physics Building. 

The schedule follows: 
9:30 a.m. James Glimm. Rockefeller University 
"Construction of P(ij>)., quantum fields: 
an expository lecture"' 
10:45 a.m. Joseph Slawny, Virginia Polytech 

"Phase transitions in systems with local symmetry" 
1:15 p.m. Ira Herbst. University of Virginia 

"Exponential decay in the Stark effect" 
2:30 p.m. Greg Lawler, Duke University 

"Random walk intersections in four dimensions" 

VOLUNTEERS FOR YOUTH 

The Volunteers for Youth are having a field day on 
Saturday, April 5th from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. This 
field day will include a basketball clinic from 10:00- 
12:00, a picnic from 12:00-1:00, and a football clinic 
from 1:00-3:00. Each of the clinics will have members 
from the Duke teams participating and mixing with the 
kids. 

Various games will be organized for everyone to 
partake in and prizes will be awarded. In order to order 
the proper amount of food and facilitate the organiza- 
tion of the field day, we need to have a commitment 
from each volunteer concerning whether he/she will/ 
will not make it to the clinics. Any questions concern- 
ing the field day, call Andy Miller at 684-0335 or one of 
the directors. 

CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
MICHAEL AND BEVERIDGE WEBSTER 

The final concert of the Chamber Arts Society will 
be a recital by Michael Webster, clarinetist, and Be- 
veridge Webster, pianist, at 8:15 p.m. on Saturday, 
April 5th, in the East Duke Music Room. A limited 
number of tickets, priced at $6.00, will be on sale at the 
door starting at 7:30 p.m. 

Father and son performing teams on the concert 
stage are rare enough to be of special interest. Father 
and son associations generally involve an already 
well-known and, ideally, well-loved father and a 
talented son on the way up. The Websters are no ex- 
ception to this pattern. 

Beveridge Webster long since achieved distinction 
as an elegant pianist of wide-ranging interests whose 
artistic formation and insights gave him something of 
an edge in the French repertory. A conscientious and 
inspiring teacher, he has for many years been a 
member of the Juilliard School faculty. 

His son, Michael, is a clarinetist who made his New 



York debut in Town Hall in 1968. He has not been idle 
since then, having appeared with the Chamber Music 
Society of Lincoln Center, been a Marlboro partici- 
pant and engaged in many other activities that build up 
the credits of an aspiring young artist. 

Michael and Beveridge Webster began their profes- 
sional collaboration with Michael Webster's debut in 
Town Hall, New York, in 1968, which was hailed by 
Donal Henahan, of the Times, as "an evening of 
superior music making, father and son performing with 
virtually flawless technique and the sort of intimacy 
and ensemble that is too rarely encountered in concert 
halls — or, in fact, anywhere beyond the circle of the 
most talented musical families." 

The program will include the Grand Duo Concer- 
tant. Opus 48 in E flat by Carl Maria von Weber; 
Three Pieces for Solo Clarinet (1919) by Igor 
Stravinsky: Sonata for Clarinet and Piano (1974) by 
Michael Webster; Premiere Rhapsody by Claude De- 
bussy; Two Mazurkas, Nocturne, Opus 27, Number 2 
in D b major and Ballade #4, Opus 52 in f minor by 
Frederic Chopin; and Allegro Brilliant by Felix Men- 
delssohn. 

THE REVEREND WILLIAM J. HADDEN 
EPISCOPAL CHAPLAIN 

The Episcopal University Center now has a full time 
Chaplain to the Duke University Community. Since 
the death of the Reverend Bruce Shepherd last fall 
there has not been an Episcopal Chaplain on campus 
until last month when the Reverend William Hadden 
was appointed for this semester. Father Hadden 
comes from the Diocese of East Carolina where he 
served in several parishs as well as having been Epis- 
copal Chaplain to Chowan College in Murfreesboro, 
North Carolina. Father Hadden is a graduate of 
Lynchburg College and received his M.Div. from the 
Lexington Theological Seminary in Kentucky, with 
additional graduate work at the Virginia Theological 
Seminary. Father Hadden is available to all members 
of the University Community for counseling and other 
pastoral services. 



ABBA EBAN SPEAKS ON 
"THE MIDDLE EAST PEACE PROCESS" 
Abba Eban, former Foreign Minister, Ambassador 
to the United States, Chief Delegate to the United Na- 
tions from Israel, and author of The Middle East in 
World Politics will speak on "The Middle East Peace 
Process" on Thursday, April 10th, at 8:00 p.m. in Page 
Auditorium. He will be sponsored by Duke University 
Hillel Foundation and the Duke University Union's 
Major Speaker's Committee. The co-sponsors are the 
Department of Judaic Studies, the Department of Po- 
litical Science, Duke-UNC International Security Af- 
fairs Seminar, Durham-Chapel Hill Jewish Federation, 
and the Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs. 
A limited number of tickets (500), priced at $5.00 gen- 
eral admission, will be available to the community be- 
ginning Wednesday, March 12th at Page Box Office. 
Student tickets, priced $1.50, will go on sale Thursday, 
April 3rd. If there are any remaining seats as of Tues- 
day, April 8th, they will become available to the com- 
munity. Tickets with checks payable to Duke Univer- 
sity, may also be purchased by mail order to Page Box 
Office, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N. C. 27706. 
Please enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope for 
ticket return. 

DUKE HOMESITES— HOUSES FOR SALE 
Location: 2404 Prince Street 
Phone: 489-7577 
Number of Bedrooms: Six (6) 
Number of Baths: Three (3) 
Type of heating/air conditioning: Oil Heat, Central Air 

PHI BETA KAPPA 
INITIATION CEREMONIES 
PHI BETA KAPPA, Beta of North Carolina, will 
meet Tuesday, April 8th, in the Art Museum Main 
Gallery for initiation ceremonies to begin promptly at 6 
p.m. Members are urged to attend. Initiates should 
come fifteen minutes early. Reservations are needed 
for the dinner to follow initiation; please inquire of the 
Secretary, Professor Carl Anderson, ext. 684-4258 or 
at 401 Perkins Library. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham. North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR! 




April 6-13, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published April 4, 1980 



Number 25 



Sunday, April 6 (EASTER) 

Through April 12th DUKE JEWISH ARTS FESTIVAL. 
Through April 24th DUU Galleries Art Exhibit: Dollhouse Invita- 
tional. West Campus Gallery. 
Through May 12th DUU Galleries Art Exhibit: Student Juried 

Show. Southgate Dorm on East Campus. 
Through April 10th AAUP Book Show for 1979. Rare Book Room, 
Perkins Library. 

6:00 a.m. EASTER SUNRISE SERVICE. Duke Gardens. 
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. C. G. Newsome, Assistant Professor 
of American Christianity. Divinity School. 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

9:00 & 11:00 a.m. EASTER University Service of Worship. (Iden- 
tical Services) University Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend 
Robert T. Young. The Service of Worship is Broadcast over 
WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
1 1 :30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults; Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

2:00 p.m. MEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. Clemson Univ. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00. 7:00, & 9:00 p.m. (SPECIAL EASTER MATINEE) Quad- 
rangle Pictures: 'THE MUPPET MOVIE.'' The fabulous 
Muppets joyously brought to the screen. The Muppets are 
wonderfully enchanting as they head for Hollywood to be- 
come stars. Stars Kermit the Frog, Miss Piggy, and the gang, 
plus all-star live cast. Dir. James Frawley. Page. $1.50. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist, Episcopal. Episcopal Student Center. 
505 Alexander Avenue. 

8:00 p.m. Jewish Arts Festival: The Art of Jewish Mime — Sasha 
Nanus. $1. Gen. Admission, available at Page Box Office and 
at door. EDMR. 

Monday, April 7 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

2:00 p.m. MEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. ECU. 

4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology and the Cell and Molecular Biology 

Program Joint Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Alan Lambowitz. Rm. 

Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
6:30 & 10:00 p.m. Duke NROTC Public Affairs Committee Movie: 

"DR. ZHIVAGO." Bio. Sci. $1.50. 
8:00 p.m. Philosophy Colloquium. Speaker: Prof. Graham Nerlich. 

Rm. 204 West Duke Bldg. 

Tuesday, April 8 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:00 Noon CIOMPI QUARTET NOON RECITAL. Guest 

guitarist. Regis Ferruzza. Rehearsal Hall Biddle Bldg. Free. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Genetics Colloquium. Ciliate Genetics by Nicholas W. 

Gillham. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics and Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

Richard A. White. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. 
2:00 p.m. MENS TENNIS: Duke vs. Wake Forest. 



2:30-3:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry and Medical Science Train- 
ing Program Joint Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Daniel Branton. 
Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

3:00 p.m. Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs Col- 
loquium. Speaker: Robert Kaiser. 201 Flowers Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Theodore Slotkin. 
Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

4:00-5:00 p.m. DU Council on Aging and Human Development 
Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Orville G. Brim, Jr.. Ph.D. Rm. 1504 
Gerontology Bldg. Open Seminar. 

4:30 p.m. Great Decisions '80 Lecture. Speaker: Dr. Jerry Hough. 
Gross Chem. Bldg. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Eucharist. Duke Chapel Crypt. 

6:00 p.m. DU Chapter PHI BETA KAPPA'S Annual Banquet 
Meeting. Art Museum. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "A FREE WOMAN. " The 
story of a recently divorced, thirtyish woman who is now 
"free" — comes across not as a polemic but as a graceful 
comedy of rueful wisdom. Considered by many the first 
masterpiece of the women's liberation movement. Dir. by 
Volker Schlondorff. Stars Margarethe von Trotta. Bio. Sci. 
Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 

7:00, 9:30 p.m. & Midnight Gilbert-Addoms Dorm. Movie: "2,000. 
SPACE ODYSSEY." Gross Chem. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Jewish Arts Festival: "PARVARIM." Israel's famous 
folk duo. Page. $3 community; $2 Students at Page Box Of- 
fice. 

8:15 p.m. SENIOR RECITAL by Spencer F. Phillips, senior bas- 
soonist. EDMR. Free. 

Wednesday, April 9 

8:30 p.m. Jewish Arts Festival: Opening Reception for artist 

Miriam Naaman. Flowers Lounge. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
April 9th-llth 10:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. Jewish Arts Festival: Art and 

Handicraft Exhibit works by Miriam Naaman. Flowers 

Lounge. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Preaching Service led by Duke Divinity 

School Community. York Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
1:00-2:30 p.m. Political Science Department Colloquium. Speaker: 

Prof. Thomas Spragens. Rm. 204 Perkins Library. 
2:00 p.m. MEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. Univ. of Richmond. 
3:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. UNC. 
3:00 p.m. Duke Draft Coalition: Forum on Registration and the 

Draft. Speaker: Antonia Chayes. Gross Chem. Aud. 
3:30 p.m. DUKE LACROSSE: Duke vs. Guilford College. 
7:00 & 10:00 p.m. DUU Major Attractions: POUSETTE-DART 

BAND AND LIVINGSTON TAYLOR. Page. $6.50 & S5.50 

General Public. Free Duke Undergrads w ticket. 
7:00 p.m. Scholarships Information Meeting. Rm. 130 

Psychology-Sociology. 
7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services Program: Rich Roberson. 

Guitar. Main Lobby. Hosp. Free. 
8:00 p.m. Duke Draft Coalition: Forum on Registration and the 

Draft. Speakers: David Cortright, Braydon Harris, and Fran 

Donelan. Gross Chem. Aud. 

Thursday, April 10 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
11:30-11:50 a.m. Communion Service led by Duke Divinity School 
Community. York Chapel. 



12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

2:00 p.m. WOMEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. UNC. 

3:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. N. C. Wesleyan. 

3:00 p.m. Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement Tea for pro- 
spective members. East Campus Center. 

3:45 p.m. Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences 
Meeting. Rm. 130 Social Sciences. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist. Episcopal. Memorial Chapel, Duke 
Chapel. 

7:00 p.m. Freewater Films: 'THE STRONG MAN." Dir. by 
Frank Capra. Stars Harry Langdon. Once as popular as 
Keaton, Chaplin, and Lloyd, Langdon quickly dropped into 
obscurity and has been all but forgotten by today's audiences. 
This film is considered by many one of the all-time great 
comedies, with episodes ranging from subtle pantomime to 
outright slapstick. Silent. Plus: POOL SHARKS.'' Dir. by 
Edwin Middleton. Stars W. C. Fields. Fields' first screen 
appearance — a fascinatingly auspicious film debut. Silent. 
Plus: "YOU NAZTY SPY." Stars The Three Stooges. The 
boys (Moe, Larry, and Curly) spoof Hitler and company. 

7:00 p.m. Scholarships Information Meeting. Rm. 130 
Psychology-Sociology . 

8:00 p.m. ABBA EBAN will speak on "The Middle East Peace 
Process." Page Aud. Tickets $1.50 students, $5.00 General 
admission. Page Box Office. 

8:15 p.m. FACULTY RECITAL. Joyce Peck, soprano; Jane 
Hawkins, pianist: Barbara Jacobson, flutist. EDMR. 

9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "THE PIP FROM PITTSBURGH." 
Stars Charley Chase with Thelma Todd. Dir. by James Par- 
rott. Though he starred in nearly 200 shorts and devoted his 
life to comedy, both as an actor and a writer-director. Chase 
was never fully appreciated in his day, and is now almost 
forgotten. Plus: "THE GOLF SPECIALIST." Dir. by Monte 
Brice. Stars W. C. Fields. Fields' first talkie adapts his classic 
vaudeville routine to film. Plus: "THE STRONG MAN." 
Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 

Friday, April 11 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. SPRINGFEST '80. Main Quad, West Cam- 
pus. Free. Open to public. 
12:00 Noon Islamic Assoc, at DU.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 

011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 
12:00 Noon Registration for Southeastern Renaissance Conference. 

2nd floor lobby. East Duke Bldg.. E. Campus. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. W. D. Billings. 
Rm. 144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
1:00 p.m. Southeastern Renaissance Conference. 2nd floor. East 

Duke Bldg. E. Campus. 
3:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Ga. Tech. 
3:00 p.m. Dept. of Economics and the School of Business Adm. 
Seminar. Speaker: Prof. Roger Sherman. Rm. 213, Social 
Sciences. 
7:00, 9:30 p.m. & Midnight Freewater Films: "BEAUTY AND 
THE BEAST." Dir. by Jean Cocteau. Stars Jean Marais, 
Josette Day, Marcel Andre. Cocteaus hauntingly beautiful 
rendition of this classic fable is great fantasy and great 
filmmaking — enjoyable on the fairy tale level and meaningful 
on the level of great poetry. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w ID 
Free: Others $1.50. 
8:15 p.m. Karamu Presents "FOR COLORED GIRLS . . ." Page 
$2. at door or Page Box Office. 

Saturday, April 12 

9:00 a.m. Southeastern Renaissance Conference. 2nd floor. East 

Duke Bldg. E. Campus. 
10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
10:30 a.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Ga. Tech. 
10:30 a.m. -Noon Colloquium on French Organ Music Lecture. 

Speaker: David Fuller. Reh. Hall MD Biddle Bldg. Open to 

Public. Free. 
2:00 p.m. -3:30 p.m. Colloquium on French Organ Music Lecture. 

Speaker: Dirk A. Flentrop. Reh. Hall MD Biddle Bldg. Open 

to public. Free. 



2:00 p.m. India Association Film Series. Bio. Sci. Admission 
Charge. 

5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

7:00 p.m. Colloquium on French Organ Music RECITAL by Fen- 
ner Douglass. Duke Chapel. Open to public. Free. 

7:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "THE DEER HUNTER." Pro- 
tracted joltingly violent saga of small town working class 
friends who are subjected to the brutalization of the Vietnam 
war. Ambitious and worth seeing. Stars Robert DeNiro, 
Christopher Walken, John Savage, John Cazale, Meryl 
Streep. Dir. Michael Cimino. (R) Page. $1.50. 

9:00 p.m. Jewish Arts Festival: ISRAELI COFFEE HOUSE. Few 
Federation Lounge. Free. 

Sunday, April 13 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:00 a.m. WOMEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. Univ. of Va. 
10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Juanita Bass Wright, Assistant 
Minister to the University. The Service of Worship is Broad- 
cast over WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
11:30-2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus Union. 
Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine Service 
available after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults', Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Univ. of Va. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00 p.m. DUKE UNIVERSITY WIND SYMPHONY GARDEN 
CONCERT. Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Open to public. Free. 

4:00 p.m. -5:30 p.m. Colloquium on French Organ Music Lecture. 
Speaker: Larry Todd. Reh. Hall MD Biddle Bldg. Open to 
public. Free. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center, 505 Alex- 
ander. A light supper is served following the service. 

7:00 p.m. Colloquium on French Organ Music RECITAL by Louis 
Robilliard. Duke Chapel. Open to public. Free. 

7:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "THE DEER HUNTER." Stars 
Robert DeNiro, Christopher Walken, John Savage, John 
Cazale, Meryl Streep. Dir. Michael Cimino. (R) Page. $1.50. 



DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, SR. 
GIVES CHAPEL ADDRESS 

Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. will be the guest 
speaker for the fourth annual Martin Luther King, 
Jr. Memorial Service on Friday, April 4th in Duke 
Chapel at 7:30 p.m. This event is sponsored by 
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. with the assistance 
of the Duke University Union's Major Speakers 
Committee. The public is cordially invited. There 
will be a freewill offering taken during the service; 
all proceeds will go to the Martin Luther King, Jr. 
Scholarship. 



THE 7TH DOLLHOUSE INVITATIONAL 

The Duke University Union Galleries Committee 
presents the 7th Dollhouse Invitational in the West 
Campus Gallery, works by artists from California to 
Indiana to North Carolina are on display until April 
24th. The works are small, at most 11" x iW in size, 
some are three-dimensional and free standing, and 
others are planar. All reveal the artists' subtle senses 
of humor. The Union Galleries Committee invites the 
public to see this exhibition. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of April 13th-April 
20th is Friday, April 4th, before 1:00 p.m. due to 

University Holiday on Monday. April 7th. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



AAUP BOOK SHOW 

Twenty-seven books, several journals and twenty- 
six book jackets produced by the nation's university 
presses will be on display through April 10th, from 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. in the Rare Book Room, Perkins 
Library. This display is sponsored by Duke University 
Press. It is the travelling AAUP (Association of 
American University Presses) Book Show for 1979. 
Come view and handle the jury's selection of the best 
productions of university presses with topics ranging 
from science in the middle ages to Canadian photog- 
raphy. 

DUKE JEWISH ARTS FESTIVAL 

A unique cultural event is scheduled for April 3rd- 
12th at Duke University: The Jewish Arts Festival. 
This ten day long Festival will bring to the Triangle 
community artists, artisans, performers, and work- 
shops in exploration of the questions: "What is Jewish 
Art?" and "Is there something distinctive that defines 
the Jewish artist?" 

The Festival, sponsored by the Duke Hillel Founda- 
tion and incorporating programs of other campus 
sponsors, will be the first event of its kind in the 
Triangle area. It will include a wide range of different 
art forms including Mime — Ms. Sasha Nanus; Israeli 
Folk Music — The Parvarim; Hebrew Cal- 



ligraphy — Mr. Jonathan Kremer: Theatre — Fiddler on 
the Roof; Lecture — Mr. Abba Eban; Israeli Contem- 
porary Painting — Ms. Miriam Naaman: Film — 
Exodus, and many other exciting events. 

The Jewish Arts Festival begins on Thursday, April 
3rd with an opening workshop and lectures by visiting 
Hebrew calligrapher Jonathan Kremer, one of Bos- 
ton's leading young calligraphers, who will offer an 
intensive workshop on Hebrew calligraphy. No previ- 
ous calligraphy experience is required, however regis- 
tration is limited to 15. The workshop will be held on 
Thursday from 4:00-7:00 p.m. and those interested 
may register by calling 942-4057. On Thursday even- 
ing, Mr. Kremer will offer a slide-lecture on "De- 
velopment and Illumination of Ketubot" (Jewish wed- 
ding documents) at 8:00 p.m. in Social Science, Rm. 
219. He concludes his visit on Friday morning with a 
lecture on "The Illuminated Hebrew Manuscript" at 
10:30 a.m. in Social Science, Rm. 219. 

The Hoof V Horn production of "Fiddler on the 
Roof" is scheduled for Friday, April 4th and Saturday, 
April 5th at 8:30 p.m. at Page Auditorium. 

On Sunday evening, April 6th, the Festival will host 
a one-woman performance by Jewish mime Sasha 
Nanus. Ms. Nanus will present a program on "The Art 
of Jewish Mime" which will be extremely wide 
ranging — "From Eve in the Garden of Eden, to a 
Female Soldier in the Israeli Army . . . she speaks an 
unspoken language of movement and expression that 
people of all ages the world over can understand." The 
performance is at 8:00 p.m. in the East Duke Music 
Room and $1.00 general admission tickets are avail- 
able at Page Box Office and at the door. 

Israel's famous folk duo, The Parvarim, considered 
by many as Israel's Simon and Garfunkel, will come to 
Page Auditorium on Tuesday, April 8th at 8:15 p.m. 
Their distinctive folk repertoire includes selections in 
Hebrew, English, Yiddish, Ladino, Greek and 
Spanish. However, the rich harmonies, superb guitar 
playing and unique arrangements of the Parvarim bear 
witness most of all to the mystique and magic of their 
birthplace, the Middle East. General admission tickets 
are $3.00 for community and $2.00 for students and are 
available at Page Box Office. A free mini-concert will 
be offered on Tuesday afternoon as a foretaste of the 
evenings performance. Check with Duke Hillel at 
942-4057 for more information. 

Israeli contemporary painter Miriam Naaman will 
exhibit her works beginning Wednesday, April 9th and 
closing on April 1 1th in Flowers Lounge. There will be 
an opening reception with the artist on Wednesday 
evening at 8:30 p.m. at which Ms. Naaman will discuss 
her paintings. Along with her paintings, the works of 
local craftsman Rabbi Ephraim Rosenzweig will be 
exhibited. His hand crafted mezuzot and other pieces 
explore the meaning of traditional forms of Jewish 
arts. The exhibit will be open from 10:00 a.m. -8:00 
p.m. Wednesday through Friday. 

Distinguished Israeli statesman, Abba Eban will 
speak in Page Auditorium on Thursday, April 10th at 
8:00 p.m. on "The Middle East Peace Process." Tick- 



ets, available at Page Box Office, are $5.00 for com- 
munity and $1.50 for students. 

The Jewish Arts Festival closes on Friday, April 
1 1th and Saturday, April 12th. On Friday, the Festival 
will sponsor several booths at the annual Duke Uni- 
versity Union's Springfest including works of Jewish 
artisans and Jewish foods. On Saturday night at 9:00 
p.m. the student-led Festival concludes with an Israeli 
Coffee House in Few Federation Lounge which will 
include local performers in an Israeli setting. The Fes- 
tival is planned by students involved in the Duke Hillel 
Foundation and is an impressive testimony to their 
creativity. Funds for this program are provided by 
Hillel along with the Durham-Chapel Hill Jewish Fed- 
eration, Greater Carolinas Association of Rabbis, 
ASDU, the Bassett Fund, and the Duke University 
Union. Further information at 942-4057. 

JOINT SEMINAR-ZOOLOGY/CELL 
& MOLECULAR BIOLOGY PROGRAM 

Dr. Alan Lambowitz, Department of Biochemistry, 
St. Louis University, will speak on "Neurospora mi- 
tochondrial DNA: recombination, deletion mutants 
and RNA splicing" for the Department of Zoology 
Joint Seminar with the Cell and Molecular Biology 
Program on Monday, April 7th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 
1 1 1 Biological Sciences Building. Coffee and tea will 
be served at 4:00 p.m. 

Dr. Alan Lambowitz has spent the last several years 
applying the techniques of modern molecular biology 
to old problems of cytoplasmic inheritance in Neuro- 
spora. In the process he has discovered that mito- 
chondrial DNA in this fungus is endowed with a host 
of novel genetic properties. His talk will summarize 
these findings. 



PHILOSOPHY COLLOQUIUM 

Professor Graham Nerlich of the University of 
Adelaide will read a paper entitled " Non-causal Ex- 
planation" for the Philosophy Colloquium on Monday, 
April 7th, at 8:00 p.m. in Room 204 West Duke Build- 
ing. 



day, April 8th, April 15th, April 22nd, and April 29th, 
in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY SEMINAR 

Dr. Richard A. White will speak on "Fern vascular 
patterns: a classical story revisited" for the Plant 
Systematics and Evolution Seminar on Tuesday, April 
8th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 130 Biological Sciences. 
Dr. White is Professor of Botany and Chairman of the 
department. He is a recognized authority on fern 
anatomy and morphology and has traveled widely in 
his studies of fern species. 

BIOCHEMISTRY/MEDICAL SCIENCES 
JOINT SEMINAR 

Dr. Daniel Branton, Department of Biochemistry, 
Harvard University, will speak on "Protein-Protein 
Interactions In Erythrocyte Membrane Cytoskeleton" 
for the Department of Biochemistry and Medical Sci- 
ence Training Program Joint Seminar on Tuesday, 
April 8th, from 2:30 p.m. -3:30 p.m. in Room 147 of the 
Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee will be served at 
2:15 p.m. in the lobby. 



COLLOQUIUM ON POLICY ANALYSIS 

Robert Kaiser, Reporter for the National Desk, The 
Washington Post, will conduct a colloquium on policy 
analysis concerning Afghanistan, the draft, and 
American foreign policy for the Institute of Policy Sci- 
ences and Public Affairs on Tuesday, April 8th, at 3:00 
p.m. in 201 Flowers Building. 



PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Theodore Slotkin, Ph.D., Department of Phar- 
macology, will speak on "Development of the Sym- 
pathetic Nervous System: Biochemistry, Function, 
and Drug-induced Abnormalities" for the Pharmacol- 
ogy Seminar on Tuesday, April 8th, at 4:00 p.m. in 
Room 147 in the Nanaline H. Duke Building. 



CIOMPI QUARTET NOON RECITAL 

The Ciompi Quartet with guest guitarist, Regis Fer- 
ruzza, will present a Recital on Tuesday, April 8th, at 
12:00 Noon, in Rehearsal Hall of the Mary Duke Bid- 
die Building. The program which is sponsored by the 
Department of Music will include several pieces one of 
which is Quintet in E Minor for guitar and string 
quartet by Luigi Boccherini. The public is invited to 
this recital for which there is no charge. 

GENETICS COLLOQUIUM 

The University Program in Genetics is sponsoring a 
Colloquium on Ciliate Genetics by Nicholas W. Gill- 
ham, Department of Zoology, at 12:30 p.m. on Tues- 



DU COUNCIL ON AGING 
AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

Orville G. Brim, Jr., Ph.D., President, Foundation 
for Child Development, New York City will speak on 
"An Agenda for Research on Human Development" 
for the Duke University Council on Aging and Human 
Development on Tuesday, April 8th, from 4:00-5:00 
p.m. in Room 1504 Gerontology Building. 

Educated at Yale (Ph.D. in 1951), Dr. Brim served 
on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin before 
joining the Russell Sage Foundation where he was 
President from 1964 to 1972. In 1974 he joined the 
Foundation for Child Development where he is cur- 
rently President. In 1979 Dr. Brim was named the Kurt 
Lewin Award recipient by the Society for the 



Psychological Study of Social Issues, a Division of the 
American Psychological Association. The award, es- 
tablished in 1948, is the nations highest honor in the 
field of social psychology. Dr. Brim's many publica- 
tions reflect his continuing interest in human develop- 
ment through the life span. 

GREAT DECISIONS '80 LECTURE 

The fourth lecture in the Great Decisions '80 series 
will be given by Dr. Jerry Hough on Tuesday, April 
8th, at 4:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Gross 
Chemistry Building. The series is being sponsored by 
the Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement with a 
grant from the North Carolina Humanities Committee. 

Dr. Jerry Hough, Professor of Political Science at 
Duke, is a Soviet Union specialist and author of "How 
the Soviet Union is Governed." 

PHI BETA KAPPA 
INITIATION CEREMONIES 

PHI BETA KAPPA. Beta of North Carolina, will 
meet Tuesday, April 8th, in the Art Museum Main 
Gallery for initiation ceremonies to begin promptly at 6 
p.m. Members are urged to attend. Initiates should 
come fifteen minutes early. Reservations are needed 
for the dinner to follow initiation; please inquire of the 
Secretary, Professor Carl Anderson, ext. 684-4258 or 
at 401 Perkins Library. 

SENIOR RECITAL BY 
SPENCER F. PHILLIPS 

Spencer F. Phillips, a senior bassoonist in the De- 
partment of Music will present his senior recital on 
Tuesday, April 8th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke 
Music Room. The public is invited to this recital for 
which there is no charge. The program which includes 
duo and ensemble pieces follows: 
Sonata for Bassoon and Piano Jerome Besozzi 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Presto 

Fred Phillips, bassoon Jane Hawkins, piano 

Quartet. Op. 40, Number 2 in B flat Franz Danzi 

for Bassoon and String Trio 

Allegretto 

Andante con moto 

Minuetto/ Allegretto 

Allegro 

FredPhillips, bassoon Annette Genovesi. violin 

Charles Jarrett. viola John Sperry, cello 

Sonatine for Bassoon and Piano Alexandre Tansman 

Allegro con moto 
Largo cantabile 
Presto 

Fred Phillips, bassoon Jane Hawkins, piano 

Quartet in d minor for bassoon, flute, oboe Georg P. Telemann 

and continuo from the "Tafelmusik" number 2 

Andante 
Vivace 
Largo 
Allegro 

Fred Phillips, bassoon Cynthia Hall, flute 

Deborah Giesler, oboe Jane Hawkins, piano 

John Sperry, cello c 



POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 
COLLOQUIUM 

Professor Thomas Spragens will speak on "Irony of 
Liberal Reason" for the Political Science Department 
Colloquium Series on Wednesday, April 9th from 1:00 
to 2:30 p.m. in Room 204 Perkins Library. 

PERSPECTIVES ON THE DRAFT 

On Wednesday, April 9th. in Gross Chem. Au- 
ditorium, the Duke Draft Coalition will sponsor a 
Forum on Registration and the Draft. Antonia Chayes, 
Under Scretary of the Air Force, will speak at 3:00 
p.m. Speakers for the forum at 8:00 p.m. are David 
Cortright, Executive Director of National SANE, 
Braydon Harris, Assistant Director of the Selective 
Service System; Fran Donelan, American Friends 
Service Committee Representative; and the moderator 
will be Professor David Barber of Duke. 

DUU MAJOR ATTRACTIONS 
POUSETTE-DART BAND & LIV. TAYLOR 

Duke University Union Major Attractions presents 
the Pousette-Dart Band with special guest star 
Livingston Taylor in a FREE CONCERT on April 9th 
at 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. in Page Auditorium. The 
concert will be free to Duke Undergraduates with tick- 
ets and beginning on April 8th at 9:00 a.m.. Page Box 
Office, the general public may purchase tickets at 
$6.50 and $5.50. The Pousette-Dart Band is a folk-rock 
band from Boston, known primarily for their ex- 
tremely successful second album "Amnesia." 
Livingston Taylor, brother of pop-rock sensation 
James Taylor, is an old friend to the community as he 
spent a large portion of his life in Chapel Hill. 
Livingston is known for his touching folk ballads and 
his warm, friendly stage presence. He has played be- 
fore at Duke (in 1971), and Major Attractions is 
pleased to again present him to the community. 

SCHOLARSHIPS INFORMATION MEETING 

Trinity College of Arts and Sciences will sponsor 
two information meetings concerning major post- 
baccalaureate scholarships this week. The session on 
Wednesday, April 9th, will be devoted to the Rhodes 
and Marshall Scholarships for study in England; on 
Thursday, April 10th, the Fulbright-Hays grants and 
the Luce Scholars Program will be discussed. Both 
meetings are scheduled for 7:00 p.m. in Room 130 
Psychology-Sociology. All students interested in ap- 
plying for these grants are urged to attend. 

DUKE INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING 
IN RETIREMENT TEA 

The Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement is 
hosting a tea for prospective members on Thursday, 
April 10th, at 3:00 p.m. at the East Campus Center. All 
interested adults in the Triangle area are cordially in- 
vited to attend. Present members will be available to 
talk about the Institute and the courses planned for 
spring and summer. Learning and doing in the peer 



groups can greatly enrich retirement living. A "little 
class" can do a lot for your life! For parking instruc- 
tions or more information call Sallie Simons at the Of- 
fice of Continuing Education, 684-6259. 



ABBA EBAN SPEAKS ON 
"THE MIDDLE EAST PEACE PROCESS" 

Abba Eban, former Foreign Minister, Ambassador 
to the United States, Chief Delegate to the United Na- 
tions from Israel, and author of The Middle East in 
World Politics will speak on "The Middle East Peace 
Process" on Thursday, April 10th, at 8:00 p.m. in Page 
Auditorium. He will be sponsored by Duke University 
Hillel Foundation and the Duke University Union" s 
Major Speaker's Committee. The co-sponsors are the 
Department of Judaic Studies, the Department of Po- 
litical Science, Duke-UNC International Security Af- 
fairs Seminar, Durham-Chapel Hill Jewish Federation, 
and the Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs. 
A limited number of tickets (500), priced at $5.00 gen- 
eral admission, will be available to the community be- 
ginning Wednesday, March 12th at Page Box Office. 
Student tickets, priced $1 .50, will go on sale Thursday, 
April 3rd. If there are any remaining seats as of Tues- 
day, April 8th, they will become available to the com- 
munity. Tickets with checks payable to Duke Univer- 
sity, may also be purchased by mail order to Page Box 
Office, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N. C. 27706. 
Please enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope for 
ticket return. 

Ambassador Eban has played an important role in 
his country's foreign affairs since the establishment of 
Israel in May, 1948. At that time he became the head of 
Israel's mission to the United Nations. When Israel 
gained membership at the UN on May 11, 1949, he 
became its Permanent Representative to the United 
Nations. A year later, at the age of 35, he assumed the 
additional portfolio of Israel's Ambassador to the 
United States of America. 

Educated at Cambridge University, where he re- 
ceived the highest academic honors, Mr. Eban 
specialized in, and later taught, Hebrew, Arabic, and 
Persian literature. His connection with political work 
in Israel began during World War II when he went to 
Jerusalem as liaison officer of Allied Headquarters to 
the Jewish population. He remained in Israel after the 
war, entering the service of the Jewish Agency in 1946 
and was a member of the delegation which secured the 
vote of the UN General Assembly in favor of the es- 
tablishment of Israel. 

In 1958 he returned to Israel to become President of 
Israel's famed center of scientific research — the 
Weizmann Institute. He was also elected to Parliament 
(the Knesset) as a member of David Ben-Gurion's 
Mapai Party and shortly after, became Minister of 
Education and Culture. In the summer of 1963, when 
Levi Eshkol became Prime Minister, Mr. Eban was 
named Deputy Prime Minister. From 1965-1974 he 
served as Israel's Foreign Minister. Mr. Eban is cur- 
rently a member of the Knesset. 



FACULTY RECITAL— JOYCE PECK 

The Department of Music will present a faculty re- 
cital by Joyce Peck, soprano and an associate with the 
voice faculty, on Thursday, April 10th, at 8:15 p.m. in 
the East Duke Music Room. Assisting Ms. Peck will 
be Jane Hawkins, pianist, and Barbara Jacobson, 
flutist. The program which is open to the public with- 
out charge follows: 
I. Aria: Ei! wi schmeckt der Kaffee siisse (BWV 211) J. S. Bach 
II. Recitative: Ch'io mi scordi di te? (K. 505) W. A. Mozart 

Aria: Non temer amato bene 
III. Wer hat dies Liedlein erdacht Gustav Mahler 

Ich ging mit Lust 

Lob des hohen Verstand 

Das irdische Leben 

Wir geniessen die himmlischen Freuden, Fourth Symphony 



Michael Head 
Paul Hindemith 



Francis Poulenc 



Sergei Rachmaninoff 



IV. A Piper 

On a Fly Drinking out of His Cup 
The Whistling Thief 
V. La Fraicheur et le Feu 

Rayon des yeux 

Le matin les branches attisent 

Tout disparut 

Dans les tenebres du jardin 

Unis la fraicheur et le feu 

Homme au sourire tendre 

La grande riviere qui va 
VI. O, Never Sing to Me Aagain, Op. 4, No. 5 
The Lilacs, Op. 21, No. 5 
The Soldier's Wife, Op. 8, No. 4 
Arion, Op. 34, No. 5 
The Little Island, Op. 14, No. 2 
Spring Waters, Op. 14, No. 11 

SPRINGFEST '80 

The Special Events Committee of the Duke Univer- 
sity Union presents Springfest '80 on Friday, April 
1 1th from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on the Main Quad of West 
Campus. This festival includes a crafts fair, food and 
beverages, and live entertainment. There is no cover 
charge and everyone is welcome. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. W. D. Billings, James B. Duke Professor of 
Botany, will speak on "Some Atmospheric Changes 
and Their Possible Consequences in Arctic and Alpine 
Ecosystems" for the Plant Ecology Seminar on Fri- 
day, April 11th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. 

SOUTHEASTERN 
RENAISSANCE CONFERENCE 

The Southeastern Renaissance Conference Thirty- 
Seventh Annual Meeting will be held Friday after- 
noon, April 11th, at 1:00 p.m. and Saturday, April 
12th, at 9:00 a.m. on the second floor, of the East Duke 
Building, East Campus. Registration will begin Friday, 
April 11th, at 12:00 noon in the second floor lobby. 

"IS PUBLIC UTILITY REGULATION 
BEYOND HOPE?" 

"Is Public Utility Regulation Beyond Hope?" will 
be the subject of a seminar presented by Professor 



Roger Sherman of the Department of Economics. The 
University of Virginia, on Friday. April 11th at 3:00 
p.m. in Room 213 Social Sciences. The seminar is 
jointly sponsored by the Department of Economics 
and the School of Businesss Administration. 

KARAMU PRESENTS 
'FOR COLORED GIRLS 

Karamu (a black student drama group) will present 
"For Colored Girls Who Considered Suicide When 
The Rainbow Is Enuf " by Ntozake Shange on Friday. 
April 11th. at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Miss 
Shange's Choreopoem was featured on Broadway as a 
celebration of being black and being a woman. "For 
Colored Girls . . ." is a celebration for black women 
but there is a subtle and far reaching message for 
everyone. Tickets, price S2.00, are available at the 
door and Page Box Office. 

The cast includes: Victoria Bernardo. Sterlia Ben- 
son, Paula Young, Anna Blackburne, Kim Smith, 
Camilla Lawson, Ava Lias, and Dawn Frisbee. Di- 
rectors are Paula Gomes and Vergil Smith. 

COLLOQUIUM ON FRENCH ORGAN MUSIC 

On Saturday, April 12th. and Sunday, April 13th, 
the Department of Music and Arts in Duke Chapel will 
sponsor a Colloquium on French Organ Music. Lec- 
tures will be held on both days in the Rehearsal Hall of 
the Mary Duke Biddle Music Building on the East 
Campus, and organ recitals will be presented in Duke 
Chapel. Both the lectures and the recitals are open to 
the public without charge. 

The colloquium will begin with a lecture by David 
Fuller. University of New York at Buffalo, on "Off- 
Center: Experiments in Harpsichord Music under 
Louis XV" on Saturday. April 12th from 10:30-Noon. 

Dirk A. Flentrop, Organ Builder — Netherlands, will 
hold the second lecture on "Handwork in the Classical 
Revival" on Saturday, April 12th, from 2:00 p.m. -3:30 
p.m. 

Fenner Douglass, University Organist, will present 
an organ recital on the Benjamin N. Duke Memorial 
Organ, Flentrop (1976) on April 12th, at 7:00 p.m. The 
program will include Suite on the Fifth Tone by Jac- 
ques Boyvin: Chaconne en La (1695) by Lambert 
Chaumont: Three verses on Pange lingua by Nicholas 
Degrigny; Selections from Messe du 8e Ton (1703) by 
Gaspard Corrette; and Grand Dialogue (1696) by 
Louis Marchand. 

Larry Todd will give a lecture on "Franz Liszt as 
Prophet — the Ad nos ad salutarem Fantasy and Fugue 
for Organ" on April 13th, from 4:00 p.m. -5:30 p.m. 

The colloquium will conclude with an organ recital 
by Louis Robilliard Lyon, France, on Sunday, April 
13th at 7:00 p.m. Mr. Robilliard is Professor of Organ 
at the National Conservatory for the Region of Lyon 
and organist at the church of Francois, Lyon. The pro- 
gram will include Choral No. 2, in B minor by Cesar 
Franck; Choral No. 3, in A minor by Franck; Con- 
certo in A minor, after Vivaldi, S. 593 by J. S. Bach; 
and Fantasie and Fugue on the Chorale by Franz 
Liszt. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY WIND SYMPHONY 
GARDEN CONCERT 
Join the Duke University Wind Symphony in the 
Sarah P. Duke Gardens for an afternoon of music in 
beautiful surroundings when they present their Spring 
Garden Concert on Sunday, April 13th at 3:00 p.m. 
The public is invited to this concert for which there is 
no charge. 

FUNDING FOR MISSION PROJECTS 
AVAILABLE FOR DUKE STUDENTS 
The Summer Foreign Mission Fund to provide 
travel and expense funds for Duke students who want 
to undertake mission projects in other countries is ad- 
ministered through the Chapel. Students interested in 
receiving monies from the fund should contact the 
Chapel office for application forms. Applications are 
due April 14th. A committee composed of various 
members of the University community will review ap- 
plications to determine those projects most suitable for 
funding. 

COMMITTEE TO REVERSE THE ARMS RACE 

The Duke Committee to Reverse the Arms Race is 
sponsoring a series of events concerned with the role 
of the military. On Sunday, April 13th, at 10:55 a.m. 
the Reverend Juanita Wright will preach a peace sab- 
bath sermon in Duke Chapel. Monday, April 14th, at 
8:00 p.m. in the York Chapel of the Divinity School, 
Michael Klare of the Institute of Policy Studies in 
Washington will speak on what he sees as a trend to 
relegitimatize United States intervention in the Third 
World. On Tuesday, April 15th, at 8:00 p.m. in Gross 
Chemistry auditorium, a movie on nuclear testing, 
"Paul Jacobson and the Nuclear Gang," will be 
shown. Wednesday, April 16th, at 8:00 p.m. in Room 
120 of the Psychology Building there will be a presen- 
tation of two points of view on the best role for the 
military. William Randall, a Major in the United States 
Army, and Chuck Epinette of the War Resisters 
League will be speaking. 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES IN 
MAY COMMENCEMENT 

A memorandum to each candidate for a degree to be 
conferred on May 11, 1980, was mailed from the Office 
of the University Marshal on March the 3rd. This 
memorandum gave directions for reserving academic 
apparel, an order of events for the Commencement 
Weekend, and information about the procuring of en- 
graved invitations and tickets. Any degree candidate 
not receiving the memorandum should consult im- 
mediately the Office of the University Marshal, 353 
Gross Chemical Laboratory, (684-6029), to be certain 
that a diploma has been ordered and that the office has 
an address for a second mailing in April. 

DUKE HOMESITES— HOUSES FOR SALE 

Only those homes located on lots originally de- 
veloped and sold by the University and which are still 
owned by a member of the faculty or staff of the Uni- 



versity will be listed in the University Calendar. Call 
Fred E. Miller at extension 2054 for information re- 
garding listings. Call the appropriate number listed 
below for information regarding a particular house. 

Location: 2417 Wrightwood 

Phone: 489-7761 

Number of Bedrooms: Five (5) 

Number of Baths: Two (2) 

Type of heating/air conditioning: Gas Heat/Central air 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. AND ED.D. DEGREES 

The final examination of Mr. Henry Leyer Band for the Ph.D. 
degree in Physics was held on Friday, March 21st. The subject of 
Mr. Band's dissertation was "Inclusive Study of 200 GeV/c PI- 
NEON Interactions."' The committee conducting the examination 
consisted of Professors William D. Walker, presiding. Moo-Young 
Han, L. C. Biedenharn, Horst M. Meyer, and Robert L. Wolpert. 



The final examination of Mr. Nelson George Landmesser for the 
Ph.D. degree in Chemistry was held on Friday. March 21st. The 
subject of Mr. Landmesser's dissertation was "The Synthesis of 
Natural Products by Photoannelation: I. Occidentalol II. Grand- 
isol." The committee conducting the examination consisted of Pro- 
fessors Steven W. Baldwin, presiding, Daniel D. Stembach, Peter 
W. Jeffs, Ned A. Porter, and Elmer Rauchman. 



The final examination of Ms. Rosalind Amy Schaefer for the 
Ph.D. degree in Psychology was held on Friday, March 21st. The 
subject of Ms. Schaefer's dissertation was "Maternal Choice of 
Child-Rearing Strategy and Birth Order of Child." The committee 
conducting the examination consisted of Professors Philip Costanzo. 
presiding, Robert Carson, John Coie, Clifford Butzin, and Kurt 
Back. 



The final examination of Mr. Charles Frederick Bond for the 
Ph.D. degree in Psychology will be held on Monday, March 24th at 
1:00 p.m. in the Adam's Conference Rm.. Soc. -Psych. Bldg. The 
subject of Mr. Bond's dissertation is "Performance in Public: Drive 
Theory and Beyond." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Alan Levy, presiding, Clifford Butzin, Philip 
Costanzo, David Rubin, and John McConahay. 



The final examination of Mr. Keith Edward Norman for the Ph.D. 
degree in Religion will be held on Monday, March 31st at 9:00 a.m. 
in Room 210 Divinity School. The subject of Mr. Norman's disser- 
tation is "Deification: The Content of Athanasian Soteriology." The 
committee to conduct the examination consists of Professors Robert 
Gregg, presiding, Franklin Young. James Charlesworth, Jill Raitt. 
and W. D. Davies. 



The final examination of Mr. Robert B. Myers for the Ph.D. de- 
gree in Chemistry was held on Thursday April 3rd. The subject of 
Mr. Myers' dissertation was "A Study of Changes in the Physical, 
Chemical, and Electrochemical Properties of Glassy Carbon with 
Chemical Surface Treatments." The committee conducting the 
examination consisted of Professors William F. Gutknecht, presid- 
ing. Richard A. Palmer, Charles H. Lochmuller, Howard A. Strobel, 
and Richard Walters. 



The final examination of Mr. Dudley Eargith Flood for the Ph.D. 
degree in Education was held on Thursday, March 20th. The subject 
of Mr. Flood's dissertation was "A Study of the Tasks and Respon- 
sibilities of Secondary Principals in North Carolina Public Schools." 
The committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors 
Anne Flowers, presiding, Anne Adams, Robert PittiUo, Robert 
Sawyer, and Richard Leach. 



The final examination of Mr. Winstead Earl Watson for the Ph.D. 
degree in Education was held on Thursday, March 27th at 10:30 a.m. 
in Room 212 West Duke Building. The subject of Mr. Watson's 
dissertation was "The State School Plant Unit." The committee 
conducting the examination consisted of Professors Robert A. Pit- 
tiUo, presiding, Anne H. Adams, Anne Flowers. Robert N. Sawyer, 
and Richard H. Leach. 



The final examination of Mr. David Leigh Rhodes for the Ph.D. 
degree in Education was held on Wednesday, April 2nd at 9:00 a.m. 
in Room 212 West Duke Building. The subject of Mr. Rhodes' dis- 
sertation was "Mens Sana, Corpore Sano: A Study of the Effect of 
Jogging on Depression Anxiety, and Self Concept." The committee 
conducting the examination consisted of Professors Robert H. Bal- 
lantyne. presiding, Lucy T. Davis, David V. Martin, and Robert N. 
Sawyer. 



The final examination of Mr. Harry Arnold Starr, Jr. for the Ed.D. 
degree in Education will be held on Monday. April 7th at 1:00 p.m. 
in Room 212 West Duke Building. The subject of Mr. Starr's disser- 
tation is "Procedural Due Process Rights for Secondary School Stu- 
dents: 1964-1978." The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors David V. Martin, presiding, Anne H. Adams, 
Anne Flowers, Richard Leach, and Robert A. Pittillo. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

calendar/ 




April 13-20, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published April 11, 1980 



Number 26 



Sunday, April 13 

Through April 24th DUU Galleries Art Exhibit: Dollhouse Invita- 
tional. West Campus Gallery. 
Through May 12th DUU Galleries Art Exhibit: Student Juried 
Show. 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:00 a.m. WOMEN'S TENNIS: Duke vs. Univ. of Va. 
10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Juanita Bass Wright, Assistant 
Minister to the University. T'he Service of Worship is Broad- 
cast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
1 1:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults; Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

2:00 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. Univ. of Va. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

3:00 p.m. DUKE UNIVERSITY WIND SYMPHONY GARDEN 
CONCERT. Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Open to public. Free. 

4:00 p.m. -5:30 p.m. Colloquium on French Organ Music Lecture. 
Speaker: Larry Todd. Reh. Hall MD Biddle Bldg. Open to 
public. Free. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center, 505 Alex- 
ander. A light supper is served following the service. 

7:00 p.m. Colloquium on French Organ Music: RECITAL by 
Louis Robilliard. Duke Chapel. Open to public. Free. 

7:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: -THE DEER HUNTER.' Pro- 
tracted joltingly violent saga of small town working class 
friends who are subjected to the brutalization of the Vietnam 
war. Stars Robert DeNiro, Christopher Walken, John Sav- 
age, John Cazale, Meryl Streep. Dir. Michael Cimino. (R) 
Page. $1.50. 

Monday, April 14 

Deadline for applications for Summer Foreign Mission Fund for 

Duke Students. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:00 Noon Environmental Engineering Graduate Students Semi- 
nar. Speaker: Bill Adair. Rm. 115A Engineering Bldg. 
12:10 p.m. Forest Protection Seminar. Speakers: Jan Mackiernan 

and Bob Schroeder. Rm. 202 Bio. Sci. 
2:00 p.m. "Government Information'' to be addressed by Lois 

Mills. Engineering Aud. 
4:00 p.m. Mathematics Colloquia. Speaker: Dr. Burton Wendroff. 

Rm. 128 Physics Bldg. 
8:00 p.m. Committee to Reverse the Arms Race. Speaker: Michael 

Klare. York Chapel, Divinity Sch. 
8:15 p.m. Department of Music PIANO RECITAL: Students of 

Boaz Sharon. EDMR. Open to public. Free. 

Tuesday, April 15 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:00 Noon Department of Music presents CELLO RECITAL. 



Students of Fred Raimi: Martin McMillan, Linda Moran. 
Jane Pridgen, John Sperry. and Jane Hawkins, piano. Re- 
hearsal Hall Biddle Music Bldg. Open to the public. Free. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Genetics Colloquium. Speaker: Dr. Nicholas W. Gill- 
ham. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics and Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Ms. 
Barbara Armbruster. Rm. 130 Bio. Sci. 

2:00 p.m. MEN'S TENNIS: UNC. 

4:00 p.m. Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Elizabeth Miller. 
Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Mathematics Colloquia. Speaker: Dr. Burton Wendroff. 
Rm. 128 Physics Bldg. 

4:30 p.m. Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement, Great Deci- 
sions '80 Lecture. Speaker: Dr. Charles Hirschman. Gross 
Chem. Aud. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Eucharist. Duke Chapel Crypt. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "THE WILD DUCK." (Con- 
temporary German Directors) Dir. by Hans W. Giessen- 
dorfer. Stars Peter Kern, Jean Seberg. Conceivably the de- 
finitive version of the Ibsen tragi-comic play. Giessendorfer 
employs a fine filmic sense of physical space, setting, and 
objects to describe the family of the photographer Hjalmar 
and their comfortable life of delusion. Bio. Sci. Duke Under- 
grads w/ID Free; Others $1.50. 

8:00 p.m. Committee to Reverse the Arms Race Movie: "PAUL 
JACOBSON AND THE NUCLEAR GANG.'" Gross Chem. 

Wednesday, April 16 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours 

9:15 a.m. -4:30 p.m. Canadian Studies Center and the Department 

of Community and Family Medicine Symposium. Alice At- 
kins Rauch Conf. Rm. Morris Bldg., Hosp. 
10:00 a.m. Campus Club Coffee and Annual Business Meeting. 

Lecture and slides by Mr. Ned E. Huffman. Burroughs 

Wellcome Research Triangle Park. 
11:30 a.m.- 11:50 a.m. Preaching Service led by Duke Divinity 

School Community. York Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30-1:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Spring Semester Speakers. 

Speaker: Elsa Woods. Rm. 202 West Duke Bldg. 
4:00 p.m. DUKE LACROSSE: Duke vs. N. C. State University. 
4:00 p.m. Department of Music presents Lecture. Speaker: Dr. 

Otto Biba. Classroom 104 Biddle Music Bldg. Open to the 

public. Free. 
7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services Program: David and Karen 

Kolbinsky and David Crabtree. Folksongs. Main Lobby, 

Hosp. Free. 
7:30 p.m. N. C. Pirg Movie: "HARLAN COUNTY." Donations 

appreciated. Bio. Sci. 
8:00 p.m. Committee to Reverse the Arms Race presents two 

points of view on the best role for the military. Speakers: 

William Randall and Chuck Epinette. Rm. 120 Psychology 

Bldg. 
8: 15 p.m. Dept. of Music: SENIOR RECITAL. Diane Alcuri. vio- 
lin; Geraldine Alcuri, piano; and Louis Alcuri, piano. EDMR. 

Open to public. Free. 
8:15 p.m. 1980 Spring Lecture for the Society of Sigma Xi. 

Speaker: Dr. Eugene I. Gordon. Gross Chem. Lab. Main 

Aud. 



Thursday, April 17 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
11:30-11:50 a.m. Communion Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:00 Noon Department of Music presents a STUDENT RE- 
CITAL: Nancy Duckies, violin: Anthony Pulgram. baritone; 
Kathryn Huestis. piano: Edward Wu, violin: and Richard 
Braaten, baritone horn. Rehearsal Hall Biddle Music Bldg. 
Open to public. Free. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

1:00 p.m. Members of the Duke Institute for Learning in Retire- 
ment visit to the Primate Facility. Carpool at Bivings Parking 
Lot. 

1:30 p.m. BASEBALL: Duke vs. St. Andrews College (2). 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist. Episcopal. Memorial Chapel. Duke 
Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: -WHY WORRY'' & WAY 
OUT WEST. " "Why Worry'?"— Dir. by Fred Newmeyer. 
Sam Taylor. Stars (Early Screen Comedians) Harold Lloyd. 
The master of thrill comedy. Lloyd is best remembered for 
his timid, bespectacled. ail-American character, who could 
make danger seem funny. Here he plays a millionaire playboy 
who inadvertently becomes involved in a banana republic 
revolution. "Way Out West." — Dir. by James W. Home. 
Stars Laurel & Hardy. Stan and Ollie try and fail and then 
finally succeed in delivering the deed to a gold mine to its 
rightful owner. An unsung comedy classic. Academy Award 
nomination for music score. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads * ID 
Free: Others SI. 50. 

8:15 p.m. Depl. of Music: COLLEGIUM MUSICUM. "Music of 
William Bvrd" Jan Herlinser. Director. Duke Chapel. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: TOYS IN THE ATTIC." Branson. 
$2.50. 

Friday, April 18 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:00 Noon Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 

011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

3:30 p.m. South Asia Committee and the Dept. of Anthropolog\ 
Lecture. Speaker: Prof. M. S. A. Rao. 012 North Bldg. 

7:00. 9:30. & Midnight Freewater Films: "WATERSHOP DOWN" 
Dir. by Martin Rosen. Animated — voices of John Hurt. Zero 
Mostel. etc. Pastel watercolors and innovative animation 
techniques bring all the unforgettable characters from 
Richard Adams' novel to life. This odyssey of a determined 
group of rabbits who search for a new home safe from man 
and from enslavement by tyrants of their own kind is an ex- 
citing and provocative movie for all ages. Rated PG. Bio. Sci. 
Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; Others SI. 50. 

8:00 p.m. AIA's North Carolina Society Lecture. Speaker: Prof. 
Wilhelmina Jashemski. Rm. 125 Engineering Sch. 

8:15 p.m. Durham Savoyards. Ltd.. Present "H.M.S. PINA- 
FORE." Page. $5. Gen. Adm.: S3 Senior Citizens: $2.50 
Children. 

8: 15 p.m. Dept. of Music: JOINT SENIOR RECITAL. Del Curl- 
ing, baritone; John Sperry, cello; and Kathryn Huestis. 
piano. EDMR. Open to public. Free. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "TOYS IN THE ATTIC." Branson. S3 
and S4. 

Saturday, April 19 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

10:30 a.m. Freewater Films: "BUGSY MALONE" (Children). Dir. 
by Alan Parker. Stars Scott Baio. Jodie Foster. Unique musi- 
cal spoof of Prohibition-era Gangster films with an all-kiddie 
cast. The machine guns even shoot marshmallows instead of 
bullets. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free, Others $1.50. 

5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

8:15 p.m. Durham Savoyards. Ltd., Present "H.M.S. PINA- 
FORE." Page. S5. Gen. Adm.: S3 Senior Citizens: $2.50 
Children. 

8:15 p.m. Department of Music: STUDENT COMPOSER CON- 
CERT by Robert Ward. Rehearsal Hall Biddle Music Bldg. 
Open to public. Free. 



8:15 p.m. Duke Plavers: "TOYS IN THE ATTIC." Branson. S3 & 
$4. 

Sunday, April 20 

9:30 & 1 1:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Harrell Beck, Professor of Old 
Testament, Boston University School of Theology. Boston, 
Massachusetts. The Service of Worship is Broadcast over 
WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room. East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
1 1 :30-2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room. West Campus Union. 
Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine Service 
available after 1:00 p.m. 

1 :30 p.m. GREEK GAMES. Main Quad East Campus. All sorority 
and fraternity members welcome. Free. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

2:00 p.m. Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting Ceremonies of Duke 
Hospital North. Front entrance New Hosp. Open to public. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Music: Junior Organ Recital by Kimberly Mar- 
shall. Duke Chapel. Open to the Public. Free. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist. Episcopal. Episcopal Student Center. 
505 Alexander Avenue. 

7:0(1 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "THE MAIN EVENT." 
1970s-style reprise of 1930s screwball comedy genre. Barbra 
Streisand's perfume business is bankrupt, her one asset the 
contract of a reluctant boxer — Ryan O'Neal. Dir. Howard 
Zieff. PG. Page. SI. 50. 

8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music: JOINT SENIOR RECITAL. Stephen 
Yang, piano and Cindy Hutton. violin. Reh. Hall Biddle 
Music Bldg. Open to public. Free. 

8:15 p.m. Durham Civic Choral Society Concert. Durham High 
School Aud. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Plavers: "TOYS IN THE ATTIC." Branson. $3 & 
$4. 

COLLOQUIUM ON FRENCH ORGAN MUSIC 

On Saturday. April 12th, and Sunday, April 13th, 
the Department of Music and Arts in Duke Chapel will 
sponsor a Colloquium on French Organ Music. Lec- 
tures will be held on both days in the Rehearsal Hall of 
the Mary Duke Biddle Music Building on the East 
Campus, and organ recitals will be presented in Duke 
Chapel. Both the lectures and the recitals are open to 
the public without charge. 

The colloquium will begin with a lecture by David 
Fuller, University of New York at Buffalo, on "Off- 
Center: Experiments in Harpsichord Music under 
Louis XV" on Saturday, April 12th from 10:30-Noon. 

Dirk A. Flentrop, Organ Builder — Netherlands, will 
hold the second lecture on "Handwork in the Classical 
Revival" on Saturday, April 12th, from 2:00 p.m. -3:30 
p.m. 

Fenner Douglass. University Organist, will present 
an organ recital on the Benjamin N. Duke Memorial 
Organ. Flentrop (1976) on April 12th, at 7:00 p.m. The 
program will include Suite on the Fifth Tone by Jac- 
ques Boyvin; Chaconne en La (1695) by Lambert 
Chaumont; Three verses on Pange lingua by Nicholas 
Degrigny; Selections from Messe du 8e Ton (1703) by 
Gaspard Corrette; and Grand Dialogue (1696) by 
Louis Marchand. 

Larry Todd will give a lecture on "Franz Liszt as 
Prophet — the Ad nos ad salutarem Fantasy and Fugue 



for Organ"" on April 13th, from 4:00 p.m. -5:30 p.m. 

The colloquium will conclude with an organ recital 
by Louis Robilliard Lyon. France, on Sunday, April 
13th at 7:00 p.m. Mr. Robilliard is Professor of Organ 
at the National Conservatory for the Region of Lyon 
and organist at the church of Francois, Lyon. The pro- 
gram will include Choral No. 2. in B minor by Cesar 
Franck: Choral No. 3, in A minor by Franck: Con- 
certo in A minor, after Vivaldi, S. 593 by J. S. Bach: 
and Fantasie and Fugue on the Chorale by Franz 
Liszt. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for S3. 50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, NC 27706: telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of April 20th- April 27 th 
is Monday, April 14th, before 1:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



THE 7TH DOLLHOUSE INVITATIONAL 

The Duke University Union Galleries Committee 
presents the 7th Dollhouse Invitational in the West 
Campus Gallery, works by artists from California to 
Indiana to North Carolina are on display until April 
24th. The works are small, at most 11" x SV2" in size, 
some are three-dimensional and free standing, and 
others are planar. All reveal the artists" subtle senses 
of humor. The Union Galleries Committee invites the 
public to see this exhibition. 

THE JURIED SHOW 
OF DUKE STUDENTS" ART 

The Duke University Union Galleries Committee 
presents the Juried Show of Duke Students' Art on 



display through May 12th in the East Campus Gallery. 
Works by Duke Students have been carried out in sev- 
eral different media. Come see these superb examples 
of the talent here at Duke! 

COMMITTEE TO REVERSE THE ARMS RACE 

The Duke Committee to Reverse the Arms Race is 
sponsoring a series of events concerned with the role 
of the military. On Sunday, April 13th, at 10:55 a.m. 
the Reverend Juanita Wright will preach a peace sab- 
bath sermon in Duke Chapel. Monday. April 14th, at 
8:00 p.m. in the York Chapel of the Divinity School. 
Michael Klare of the Institute of Policy Studies in 
Washington will speak on what he sees as a trend to 
relegitimatize United States intervention in the Third 
World. On Tuesday. April 15th. at 8:00 p.m. in Gross 
Chemistry auditorium, a movie on nuclear testing. 
'Paul Jacobson and the Nuclear Gang." will be 
shown. Wednesday. April 16th. at 8:00 p.m. in Room 
120 of the Psychology Building there will be a presen- 
tation of two points of view on the best role for the 
military. William Randall, a Major in the United States 
Army, and Chuck Epinette of the War Resisters 
League will be speaking. 

DUKE UNIVERSITY WIND SYMPHONY 
GARDEN CONCERT 

Join the Duke University Wind Symphony in the 
Sarah P. Duke Gardens for an afternoon of music in 
beautiful surroundings when they present their Spring 
Garden Concert on Sunday, April 13th at 3:00 p.m. 
The public is invited to this concert for which there is 
no charge. 

FUNDING FOR MISSION PROJECTS 
AVAILABLE FOR DUKE STUDENTS 

The Summer Foreign Mission Fund to provide 
travel and expense funds for Duke students who want 
to undertake mission projects in other countries is ad- 
ministered through the Chapel. Students interested in 
receiving monies from the fund should contact the 
Chapel office for application forms. Applications are 
due April 14th. A committee composed of various 
members of the University community will review ap- 
plications to determine those projects most suitable for 
funding. 

EEGS SEMINAR 

Bill Adair, a biologist in the Duke Power Environ- 
mental Laboratories in Charlotte, will lead a discus- 
sion on the Duke Power Environmental Laboratories' 
perspective on Nuclear Power for the Environmental 
Engineering Graduate Students Seminar on Monday, 
April 14th, at 12 Noon in Room 115A Engineering 
Building. Bring your lunch — beverages and cookies 
provided. 

FOREST PROTECTION SEMINAR 

The School of Forestry and Environmental Studies 
is sponsoring a Forest Protection Seminar on Monday, 



April 14th. at 12:10 p.m. in Room 202 Biological Sci- 
ences. Jan Mackiernan will discuss "PHNV's as a 
biocontrol for the gypsy moth" and Bob Schroeder 
will speak on "Potential insect vectoring of Endothia 
parasitica on oaks and chestnuts." 

GOVERNMENT INFORMATION 

Millions of tax dollars are spent each year by Fed- 
eral agencies producing information for and about our 
government and collecting and analyzing data about all 
aspects of life in the United States. At present much of 
this information is made available to the public in 
printed form or microfiche. Advancing technology has 
produced many other methods for storing and dis- 
seminating such data. Video-discs, computer data 
bases, records, films and tapes are being utilized by 
many agencies in the Federal Government. The law 
governing public access to this information. Title 44 of 
the United States Code, was written in 1895 and does 
not address issues raised by the new dissemination 
mechanisms. Legislation has been introduced in Con- 
gress to revise Title 44 to ensure the public"s right of 
free access to tax supported information. Debate on 
the proposed revision has raised fundamental issues 
including the relationship between the legislative 
branch and the executive branch, government compe- 
tition with private interests and free public access to 
government information. Lois Mills, Government 
Publications and Legal Reference Librarian, Associate 
Professor at Western Illinois University, will address 
the topic on Monday. April 14th, at 2:00 p.m. in the 
Engineering Auditorium. (For additional information, 
contact Jaia Barrett. Public Documents Dept.. Perkins 
Library, 684-2380.) 

MATHEMATICS COLLOQUIA 

Dr. Burton Wendroff of the Los Alamos Scientific 
Laboratory will present two Mathematics Colloquium 
lectures. The first is entitled "Bounds for the Model 
Quench Front" and will be held on Monday, April 14th 
at 4:00 p.m. in Room 128 Physics Building. The second 
lecture is entitled "A New Inequality for Symmetric 
Functions" and will be held on Tuesday. April 15th at 
4:00 p.m. in Room 124 Physics Building. Refreshments 
will be served both afternoons at 3:30 p.m. in Room 
138 Physics Building. All interested persons are cor- 
dially invited to attend these lectures. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC PIANO RECITAL 
STUDENTS OF BOAZ SHARON 

Students of Boaz Sharon will be presented in a piano 
recital for the Department of Music on Monday, April 
14th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. The 
program which includes piano works by Bartok, 
Beethoven. Debussy. Faure. Ravel, Schubert, Stock- 
hausen and "'Fats" Waller is open to the public with- 
out charge. 

GENETICS COLLOQUIUM 

Dr. Nicholas W. Gillham. Department of Zoology, 
will hold the second Genetics Colloquium in a series 



on Ciliate Genetics on Tuesday, April 15th, at 12:30 in 
Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY SEMINAR 

Ms. Barbara Armbruster, graduate student in the 
Department of Botany, will speak on "Sporangium 
development and spore discharge in members of the 
Saprolegniaceae" for the Plant Systematics and 
Evolution Seminar Tuesday, April 15th. at 12:30 p.m. 
in Room 130 Biological Sciences. The topic is the sub- 
ject of Ms. Armbruster's doctoral research. Spore dis- 
charge mechanisms in watermolds have long been a 
mystery, and subject to several interpretations. Ms. 
Armbruster has attempted to solve these problems by 
an ultrastructural approach. 

PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Elizabeth Miller. Ph.D., Department of Oncology, 
McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, will speak 
on "Some Aspects of the Metabolic Activation of 
Chemical Carcinogens" for the Department of Phar- 
macology Seminar on Tuesday, April 15th, at 4:00 
p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee 
will be served in the lobby at 3:45 p.m. 

GREAT DECISIONS "80 LECTURE 

The fifth Great Decisions '80 Lecture will be given 
on Tuesday, April 15th, at 4:30 p.m. in the auditorium 
of the Gross Chemistry Building. Dr. Charles 
Hirschman of the Sociology Department will speak on 
"Humanity on the Move: How Migration Affects 
U. S." This subject deals with such problems as the 
"boat people" and illegal aliens from Mexico. The 
series is being sponsored by the Duke Institute for 
Learning in Retirement. 

CAMPUS CLUB MEETING 

The Campus Club Coffee and Annual Business 
Meeting will be held at Burroughs Wellcome. Re- 
search Triangle Park, on Wednesday, April 16th at 
10:00 a.m. A lecture and slides on the Research 
Triangle will be presented by Mr. Ned E. Huffman. 
Executive Vice President of the Research Triangle 
Foundation. 

KAPPA DELTA PI 
SPRING SEMESTER SPEAKERS 

Elsa Woods' topic will be "Turning Kids on to 
Writing" for the Kappa Delta Pi Spring Semester 
Speakers on Wednesday, April 16th. from 12:30 p.m.- 
1:30 p.m. in Room 202 of the West Duke Building. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC LECTURE 
DR. OTTO BIBA 

Dr. Otto Biba of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde 
in Vienna will present a lecture on the history of that 
institution in Room 019 of the Mary Duke Biddle 



Music Building at 4:00 p.m., Wednesday, April 16th. 
The Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde, founded in 1813. 
quickly became established as a leading center of 
musical performance and study. Among the many 
prominent composers associated with it during the first 
half of the nineteenth century were Beethoven, 
Schubert, and Mendelssohn: its artistic directors in the 
second half of the century included Anton Rubinstein 
and Brahms, and its archivists, the important Haydn 
scholars Carl Ferdinand Pohl and Eusebius Mandy- 
czewski. Dr. Biba is presently the director of the li- 
brary. 

Dr. Biba"s scholarly interests encompass a wide 
range of fields, including the Austrian Piarist monastic 
order and its influence on the arts in the eighteenth and 
nineteenth centuries. He has published numerous 
studies on Heinrich Schiitz. Benedetto Marcello, 
Mozart, Schubert, and the organ builders Johann 
Hencke and Carl Friedrich Ferdinand Buchow. He has 
also examined the eighteenth-century pastorale, and 
the Gregorian Easter Alleluia as a thematic motive in 
the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. 

Refreshments will be served following Dr. Biba's 
lecture. Admission is free. 

SENIOR RECITAL BY DIANE ALCURI 

The Department of Music will sponsor a Senior Vio- 
lin Recital by Diane Alcuri (Ciompi's Student), ac- 
companied by Louis and Geraldine Alcuri, on 
Wednesday, April 16th. at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke 
Music Room. The program will include the Sonata #/ 
in A Major. No. 305, by Mozart: the Sonata #/ in G 
Major, Opus 78, by Brahms: and the Concerto for 
Two Violins in A Minor, Opus 3, No. 8, by Vivaldi. 
The public is invited to this recital for which there is no 
charge. 

1980 SPRING LECTURE FOR THE 
SOCIETY OF SIGMA XI 

The 1980 Spring Lecture for the Society of Sigma Xi 
will be a public lecture given by Dr. Eugene I. Gordon, 
Director of the Optical Devices Laboratory, Bell 
Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey. His topic will 
be "A little Light on Light Waves"' and will be given 
on Wednesday. April 16th at 8:15 p.m. in the main 
auditorium of the Paul M. Gross Chemical Laboratory. 

Light wave communication for telephone, television 
and computers — Exactly one hundred years ago, 
Alexander Graham Bell invented "photo-telephones." 
Two months ago, most of ABC's television of the 
Olympic Games was communicated over optical 
fibers. What are the limiting factors in present com- 
munication systems that make light-wave communica- 
tion attractive now, 100 years after the invention? 
What are the developments with fiber optics, lasers, 
and photo-detectors that make light-wave communi- 
cation feasible and economical now? How does one 
construct an optical communication system? These are 
a few of the questions to be answered in the illustrated 
lecture for a general audience. 



INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING IN RETIREMENT 

Members of the Duke Institute for Learning in Re- 
tirement who have signed up to visit the Primate 
Facility Thursday. April 17th. will meet at Bivins 
Parking Lot at 1:00 p.m. to join the carpool to the 
center. The return trip to Bivins will be at 3:30 p.m. 
Members should sign up at the Campus Center. 

COLLEGIUM MUSICUM SPRING CONCERT 

""Music of William Byrd" is the title of the Col- 
legium Musicum's Spring Concert, sponsored by the 
Department of Music, on Thursday evening, April 
17th, at 8:15 p.m. in Duke Chapel. The program is 
divided into three parts: In the Service of the Church 
of England: Psalms, Sonnets, and Songs of Sundry 
Natures: and Byrd the Catholic. Soloists, the Vocal 
Ensemble and the Viol Consort will be under the di- 
rection of Jan Herlinger. The public is invited to this 
concert without charge. 

DUKE PLAYERS PRESENT 
"TOYS IN THE ATTIC"" 

The Duke Players bring a very successful 50th an- 
niversary season to a close with Lillian Hellman's 
Toys in the Attic. Eight performances are scheduled 
for Thursday through Sunday, April 17th-20th and 
April 24th-27th. Curtain time is 8:15 p.m. at Branson 
Theatre. 

Lillian Hellman, one of America's foremost play- 
wrights, has written twelve plays during a distin- 
guished career in which she has also been a top Hol- 
lywood screenwriter, an editor, and a highly contro- 
versial public figure. All of her plays demonstrate a 
keen insight into human nature and psychological 
weakness. The earlier plays, such as The Children's 
Hour, The Little Foxes, and Watch on the Rhine, are 
especially concerned with various aspects of greed and 
destructive selfishness in society. The later plays do 
not place as much emphasis on social problems, and 
the best of these plays in Toys in the Attic. 

Toys in the Attic is a serious drama centering around 
two spinster sisters, Anna and Carrie Berniers. who 
live in New Orleans. They have dreamed of visiting 
Europe but are constantly spending their meager sav- 
ings helping their younger brother, Julian, out of finan- 
cial difficulties. One day. Julian returns home, bringing 
elaborate and expensive gifts. Suspicions of illegal 
dealings arise as Julian sports his new-found wealth, 
and tensions mount as the characters struggle to adjust 
to Julian's unexpected independence. 

This final production of the 50th anniversary season 
is being directed by Duke Players Resident Scenic De- 
signer Ron Regier. Scenic and lighting design will be 
handled by Guest Designer Richard Harmon. Mr. 
Harmon holds an M.F.A. from N.Y.U. School of Arts 
and has designed over 35 productions, most recently 
Jesse and the Bandit Queen at the Impossible Ragtime 
Theatre in New York. Costumes for Toys in the Attic 
will be designed by Resident Costume Designer Do- 
reen Wetzel. 



Tickets at S4.00 Center Section. $3.00 Side Sections, 
and $2.50 for all Thursday Night seats are on sale now 
at Page Box Office. Tickets may also be purchased 
using Mastercharge or Visa by phoning Instantcharge 
at 684-3227 weekdays between the hours of 10 a.m. 
and 3 p.m. 

INDIAN SOCIOLOGIST TO SPEAK 

M.S. A. Rao. Professor of Sociology, Delhi School 
of Economics. University of Delhi, will speak on 
"Peasant Colonization and Tribal Alienation — Andhra 
Pradesh" for the South Asia Committee and the De- 
partment of Anthropology on Friday, April 18th, at 
3:30 p.m. in 012 North Building. The lecture is open to 
the public. A reception for Dr. Rao will be given in the 
Commons Room following the lecture. Dr. Rao is 
presently visiting Professor at the University of Vir- 
ginia. He has written widely on social movements and 
social transformation in India as well as editing sur- 
veys of research in sociology and social anthropology. 
He lectured at Duke in the spring semester. 1973. 

AIAs NORTH CAROLINA 

SOCIETY LECTURE 

BY PROF. WILHELMINA JASHEMSKI 

To help celebrate the centennial of the Archaeologi- 
cal Institute of America and to commemorate the 
1,900th anniversary of the destruction of Pompeii, the 
AIA's North Carolina Society presents a public lecture 
by Professor Wilhelmina Jashemski (University of 
Maryland) on her excavations of gardens at Pompeii. 
The lecture will be on Friday, April 18th, at 8:00 p.m. 
in Room 125 of the Engineering School behind Duke 
Chapel. The lecture and the reception which follows 
are open to the public without charge. A banquet by 
reservation precedes: for more information, call John 
Younger, 684-6974/5076. 

Professor Jashemski having traced ancient planting 
beds, obtained casts of root cavities, analyzed pollen, 
and re-assembled planter boxes and flower pots, has 
been able to reconstruct the layouts and seasons of 
private, public, and commercial gardens in first cen- 
tury A. D. Pompeii. Her well-received book. Gardens 
in Pompeii and Herculaneum, has just been published. 

DURHAM SAVOYARDS, LTD., PRESENT 
"H.M.S. PINAFORE" 

The Durham Savoyards, Ltd., present Gilbert and 
Sullivan's perpetual favorite, "H.M.S. Pinafore." The 
production is co-directed by Paul Bryan of the De- 
partment of Music at Duke and Ben Keaton of the 
Drama Department at North Carolina Central. It is the 
third production of "Pinafore" mounted by the 
Savoyards in their eighteen-year history, and the cast, 
as usual, contains both veterans of the company and 
newcomers. Patrick D. Kenan sings the role of Sir 
Joseph Porter, and Sheila Berninger repeats the part of 
Josephine that she sang in 1970: other members of the 
Duke community aboard are Pepper Fluke, Shirley 



Hanks, Mary Umstead, Marian Kilne, Charles Apple, 
David Bradley. Donald Fluke, David Martin, David A. 
Smith, Shiangtai Tuan. John P. Waggoner. Jr.. and 
Richard Watson. The orchestra consists of more than 
twenty area instrumentalists. Earl Wolslagel, concert 
master. Performances are at Page Auditorium, Friday, 
April 18th and Saturday, April 19th, at 8:15 p.m. (re- 
peated April 25th-26th at Stewart Theater in Raleigh): 
Tickets priced at $5 General Admission: $3 Senior 
Citizens: and $2.50 Children are available at Page Box 
Office. 

JOINT SENIOR RECITAL BY 
DEL CURLING AND JOHN SPERRY 

The Department of Music will sponsor a Joint Senior 
Recital by Del Curling, baritone, and John Sperry, cel- 
list, on Friday evening, April 18th, at 8:15 p.m. in the 
East Duke Music Room. Mr. Curling will be accom- 
panied by Kathryn Huestis. The public is invited to 
this recital without charge. 

STUDENT COMPOSER CONCERT 
PRESENTED BY ROBERT WARD 

On Saturday, April 19th, a Student Composer Con- 
cert will be presented by Robert Ward for the Depart- 
ment of Music at 8:15 p.m. in the Rehearsal Hall of the 
Mary Duke Biddle Music Building on East Campus. 
Included in the concert will be the Ciompi Quartet 
playing string quartets composed by Michael Ching 
and Scott Tiliey. This concert is open to the public 
without charge. 

GRAND OPENING DUKE HOSPITAL NORTH 

The Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting Ceremonies 
for the North Division of Duke Hospital are scheduled 
for Sunday. April 20th, at 2:00 p.m. The ceremony will 
take place at the front entrance of the new hospital. 
Tours of the first and second floors will follow the 
ceremony. The entire university community is invited 
to attend. 

JUNIOR ORGAN RECITAL BY 
KIMBERLY MARSHALL 

The Department of Music is sponsoring a Junior 
Organ Recital by Kimberly Marshall on Sunday, April 
20th, at 4:00 p.m. in Duke Chapel. Ms. Marshall is a 
Junior at Duke. The program will include works by 
Johann Sebastian Bach, Jacques Charpentier. Cesar 
Franck and Marcel Dupre. The public is invited to this 
recital for which there is no charge. 

Ms. Marshall has just returned from France, where 
she was a student of Odile Bailleux in Paris, and Louis 
Robilliard in Lyon. She holds the top award in organ 
performance given by the Lyon Conservatory. Ms. 
Marshall is now preparing to enter the Chartres Inter- 
national Organ Competition to be held in Chartres 
Cathedral next September. Kimberly Marshall is a 
Morehead Scholar at UNC-Chapel Hill, working also 
at the Department of Music here at Duke. 



JOINT SENIOR RECITAL 
STEPHEN YANG AND CINDY HUTTON 

Pianist. Stephen Yang, and violinist, Cindy Hut- 
ton, will present a Joint Senior Recital for the Depart- 
ment of Music on Sunday evening. April 20th, at 8:15 
p.m. in the Rehearsal Hall of the Mary Duke Biddle 
Music Building on East Campus. Stephen Yang is a 
student of John Ruggero, and Cindy Hutton is a stu- 
dent of Giorgio Ciompi. The public is invited to this 
recital without charge. 

DURHAM CIVIC CHORAL SOCIETY CONCERT 

The Durham Civic Choral Society of the Durham 
Arts Council will present the Cherubini Requiem 
Mass in C Minor on Sunday, April 20th, at 8:15 p.m. 
in the Durham High School Auditorium. James Ogle, 
Associate Conductor of the North Carolina Sym- 
phony, will direct the concert. Also on the program 
will be music by Brahms, Hoist, Hanson, and 
Thompson. 

NEUROBEHAVIORAL SCIENCES RESEARCH 

TRAINING PROGRAM 

14TH ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM 

Drs. Ian Creese, Everett Ellinwood, Jr., Pierre 
Flor-Henry, Philip Groves, Barry Jacobs, and Richard 
Wyatt will review special areas of the neurobiological 
basis of psychosis and animal models of psychosis at 
the "Neurobiological Basis of Psychosis" annual 
symposium being held Monday, April 21st, at 9:00 
a.m. -5:30 p.m. in the Searle Center Lecture Hall of the 
Medical Center Library. Discussions will focus on the 
conceptual issues that confront various neuroscience 
approaches to research on psychosis. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. AND ED.D. DEGREES 

The final examination of Ms. Diane Sautter Adkins for the Ph.D. 
degree in Religion was held on Friday, April 4th at 10:00 a.m. in 
Room 210 Divinity School. The subject of Ms. Adkins' dissertation 
was "Meeting in a Meaning: Personal Knowledge in Literary Crit- 
icism as a Foundation for Religion and Literature Studies.'' The 
committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors Wil- 
liam H. Poteat, presiding, Robert Osbom, Wesley A. Kort, Thomas 
A. Langford, and David S. Steinmetz. 



The final examination of Ms. Kathleen Lynn Allen-Weber for the 
Ph.D. degree in Romance Languages was held on Friday, April 4th. 
The subject of Ms. Allen- Weber's dissertation was "The Intellectual 
Adventure: Poetry and Art Criticism as Integral Expression of 
Apollinaire's Vision." The committee conducting the examination 
consisted of Professors Philip Stewart, presiding. Thomas H. Cor- 
dle. Inez Hedges, Patrick R. Vincent, and Ernesto Caserta. 



The final examination of Mr. Mohammad Tabibian for the Ph.D. 
degree in Economics was held on Monday, April 7th. The subject of 
Mr. Tabibian's dissertation was "In Empirical Investigation in the 
Theory of Consumer Behavior." The committee conducting the 
examination consisted of Professors T. Dudley Wallace, presiding, 
Marjorie McElroy. E. Roy Weintraub, and A. Ronald Gallant. 



zation of Calsequestrin in Muscle Cells." The committee conducting 
the examination consisted of Professors Joachim Sommer, presid- 
ing. John Shelburne, Donald Hackel. Harvey Sage, and Gerhard 
Meissner. 

The final examination of Mr. Daniel Lee Kilpatrick for the Ph.D. 
degree in Biochemistry was held on Tuesday. April 8th. The subject 
of Mr. Kilpatrick's dissertation was "Stimulus-Secretion Coupling 
in Cultured Bovine Adrenal Medulla Cells." The committee con- 
ducting the examination consisted of Professors Norman Kirshner, 
presiding. Robert Lefkowitz, Harvey Sage, and Thomas Vanaman. 

The final examination of Ms. Adrienne M. McElwain for the 
Ph.D. degree in Economics was held on Tuesday, April 8th. The 
subject of Ms. McElwain's dissertation was "The Modelling of the 
Time-of-Day Demand for Electricity: An Investigation of the 
Carolina Power and Light Residential Time-of-Day Pricing Ex- 
periment." The committee conducting the examination consisted 
of Professors Marjorie McElroy, presiding. T. Dudley Wallace, 
H. Gregg Lewis, and John M. Vernon. 



The final examination of Mr. Frederic William Whitehurst for the 
Ph.D. degree in Chemistry was held on Tuesday, April 8th at 3:00 
p.m. in Room 103 Gross Chemical Laboratory. The subject of Mr. 
Whitehurst's dissertation was "An Indo Interpretation of C 13 NMR 
Chemical Shielding in Hydrocarbons." The committee conducting 
the examination consisted of Professors Donald B. Chesnut, pre- 
siding. Alvin L. Crumbliss. Peter Smith. A. T. McPhail, and Michael 
Reed. 

The final examination of Ms. Myra Beth Mackie for the Ph.D. 
degree in Religion was held on Wednesday. April 9th. The subject of 
Ms. Mackie's dissertation was "John Hick's Theodicy." The com- 
mittee conducting the examination consisted of Professors Thomas 
A. Langford. presiding. Robert E. Cushman. Robert T. Osborn, 
Harry B. Partin, and George W. Roberts. 



The final examination of Ms. Linda Joy Pike for the Ph.D. degree 
in Biochemistry was held on Wednesday. April 9th at 9:00 a.m. in 
Room 331 Sands Building. The subject of Ms. Pike's dissertation 
was "Beta-Adrenergic Receptor-Coupled Adenylate Cyclase Sys- 
tem: Investigation of the Role of Protein Components in the Expres- 
sion of Drug Intrinsic Activity and Desensitization." The committee 
conducting the examination consisted of Professors Robert Lef- 
kowitz, presiding, K. V. Rajagopalan. Henry Kamin, Walter Guild, 
and Thomas Vanaman. 

The final examination of Ms. Sharon Anderholm Wiener for the 
Ph.D. degree in Political Science was held on Thursday. April 10th. 
The subject of Ms. Weiner's dissertation was "Turkish Foreign 
Policy Decision-Making on the Cyprus Issue: A Comparative 
Analysis of Three Crises." The committee conducting the examina- 
tion consisted of Professors Ole Holsti. presiding, R. Taylor Cole, 
Albert Eldridge. Arturo Valenzuela, and Thomas Huber. 



The final examination of Ms. Marion Winifred Roydhouse for the 
Ph.D. degree in History was held on Friday. April 1 1th. The subject 
of Ms. Roydhouse's dissertation was "The Universal Sisterhood of 
Woman:' Women and Labor Reform in North Carolina. 1900-1932." 
The committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors 
Anne Firor Scott, presiding. Richard L. Watson, Jr.. Sydney 
Nathans, and Frank T. de Vyver. 



The final examination of Mr. James Lesslie Junker for the Ph.D. 
degree in Pathology was held on Monday, April 7th. The subject of 
Mr. Junker's dissertation was "The Immunohistochemical Locali- 



The final examination of Mr. Roland Daniel Zimany for the Ph.D. 
degree in Religion was held on Friday, April 1 1th. The subject of Mr. 
Zimany's dissertation was "Eberhard Jungel's Synthesis of Barth 
and Heidegger." The committee conducting the examination con- 
sisted of Professors Frederick Herzog, presiding, William H. Poteat, 
Robert T. Osborn, Thomas A. Langford, and George W. Roberts. 

The final examination of Ms. Mabel Thomasine Hardy for the 
Ph.D. degree in Education will be held on Monday. April 14th at 
1:00 p.m. in Room 212 West Duke Building. The subject of Ms. 
Hardy's dissertation is "Roles and Responsibilities of School 
Psychologists." The committee to conduct the examination consists 



of Professors William Cartwright, presiding, W. Scott Gehman. 
Robert Pittillo, and John Fowler. 



The final examination of Mr. Gary Paul Lehmann for the Ph.D. 
degree in English will be held on Thursday, April 14th at 3:00 p.m. in 
Room 328 Allen Building. The subject of Mr. Lehmann's disserta- 
tion is "A Critical Analysis of the Works of John Day (ca. 1574-ca. 
1640)." The committee to conduct the examination consists of Pro- 
fessors Dale B. J. Randall, presiding, George W. Williams, A. Leigh 
DeNeef, Oliver Ferguson, and Arthur Ferguson. 



The final examination of Mr. Buell Glen Epley, Jr. for the Ph.D. 
degree in Education will be held on Tuesday, April 15th at 1:00 p.m. 
in Room 212 West Duke Building. The subject of Mr. Epley's dis- 
sertation is "The Emerging Concept of Educational Malpractice: 
The Courts and Tortious Teacher Actions Relating to the Instruc- 
tion, Supervision, and Protection of Students." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors Peter Carbone, 
presiding, Michael Michlin, Robert Pittillo, and Robert Durden. 

The final examination of Mr. James Martin Swafford for the Ph.D. 
degree in English will be held on Friday, April 18th at 3:00 p.m. in 
Room 315 Allen Building. The subject of Mr. Swafford's dissertation 
is "The Allegorical Vision of Dante Gabriel Rossetti." The com- 
mittee to conduct the examination consists of Professors Gerald 
Monsman, presiding. Grover Smith. Wallace Jackson, Robert Gleck- 
ner. Oliver Ferguson. 



The final examination of Ms. Delma Clark Blinson for the Ed.D. 
degree in Education was held on Thursday, April 3rd at 2:30 p.m. in 
Room 212 West Duke Building. The subject of Ms. Blinson's dis- 
sertation was "An Analysis of Selected State Court Cases on School 
Finance Since 1973." The committee conducting the examination 
consisted of Professors Robert A. Pittillo, presiding, William H. 
Cartwright, Mary E. Mayesky, Peter G. Fish, and Richard H. 
Leach. 



The final examination of Mr. Harry Arnold Starr, Jr. for the Ed.D. 
degree in Education was held on Monday, April 7th at 1:00 p.m. in 
Room 212 West Duke Building. The subject of Mr. Starr's disserta- 
tion was "Procedural Due Process Rights for Secondary School 
Students: 1964-1978." The committee conducting the examination 
consisted of Professors David V. Martin, presiding, Anne H. 
Adams, Anne Flowers, Richard Leach, and Robert A. Pittillo. 



The final examination of Mr. John Livingston Kinlaw for the 
Ed.D. degree in Education will be held on Friday. April 14th at 3:00 
p.m. in Room 213-1 West Duke Building. The subject of Mr. Kin- 
law's dissertation is "A Property Equalization School Finance Plan 
for Public Education in North Carolina." The committee to conduct 
the examination consists of Professors Robert A. Pittillo, presiding, 
William H. Cartwright, Anne Flowers, Robert N. Sawyer, and 
Richard H. Leach. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 






Duke University 

CALENDAR^ 




April 20-27, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published April 18. 1980 



Number 27 



Sunday, April 20 

Through April 24th DUU Galleries Art Exhibit: Dollhouse Invita- 
tional. West Campus Gallery. 
Through May 12th DUU Galleries Art Exhibit: Student Juried 
Show . 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Harrell Beck. Professor of Old 
Testament. Boston University School of Theology, Boston. 
Massachusetts. The Service of Worship is Broadcast over 
WDBS. 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
S3. 50 adults; Vi price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

1:30 p.m. GREEK GAMES. Main Quad East Campus. All sorority 
and fraternity members welcome. Free. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

2:00 p.m. Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting Ceremonies of Duke 
Hospital North. Front entrance New Hosp. Open to public. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

4:00 p.m. Dept. of Music: Junior Organ Recital By Kimberly Mar- 
shall. Duke Chapel. Open to the Public. Free. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist, Episcopal. Episcopal Student Center. 
505 Alexander Avenue. 

7:00 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: 'THE MAIN EVENT." 
1970s-style reprise of 1930s screwball comedy genre. 
BARBRA Streisand's perfume business is bankrupt, her one 
asset the contract of a reluctant boxer — Ryan O'Neal. Dir. 
Howard Zieff. PG. Page. SI. 50. 

8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music: JOINT SENIOR RECITAL. Stephen 
Yang, piano and Cindy Hutton, violin. Reh. Hall Biddle 
Music Bldg. Open to public. Free. 

8:15 p.m. Durham Civic Choral Society Concert. Durham High 
School Aud. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Plavers: "TOYS IN THE ATTIC." Branson. S3 & 
$4. 

Monday, April 21 

SPRING SEMESTER GRADUATE CLASSES END. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. Neurobehavioral Sciences Research Training 

Program 14th Annual Symposium. Speakers: Drs. Ian 

Creese. Everett Ellinwood. Jr., Pierre Flor-Henry. Philip 

Groves. Barry, Jacobs, and Richard Wyatt. Searle Center 

Lecture Hall. Med. Center Library. 
3:30 p.m. University Review CommiUee Meeting. Board Room. 

Allen Bldg. 
4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Joanne M. Werts. 

Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
8:00 p.m. NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY CONCERT. Page 

Aud. S6 adults; $3 Students. 65i. and Symphony Society 

members or Season tickets. 

Tuesday, April 22 

Through April 28th Tuesday-Monday. Reading period (Graduate). 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 



11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Prayer Service led by Duke Divinity School 

Community. York Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Genetics Colloquium. Speaker: Dr. Nicholas W. Gill- 
ham. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Economics Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Douglas W. 

Webbink. Rm. 214 Social Sciences Bldg. Open to public. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Systematics and Evolution Seminar. Speaker: Ms. 
Deborah Langsam. Rm. 130 Biological Sciences. 

4:00 p.m. Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Les Carter. Rm. 408 
Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

4:30 p.m. Great Decisions "80 Lecture. Speaker: Prof. Arturo A. 
Valenzuela. Gross Chem. Bldg. 

5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Eucharist. East Campus Center. 

7:00, 9:00, & 11:00 p.m. Duke Republican's Comedy Night 
featuring "A PLUMBING WE WILL GO" by the Three 
Stooges and several other comedy shorts including cartoons. 
$1.00. Gross Chem. 

7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "WOYZECK" (Contemporary 
German Dir.) Dir. by Werner Herzog. Stars Klaus Kinski. 
Eva Mattes. Based on Georg Biichner's fragmentary 
masterpiece — story of soldier/barber Woyzeck who, driven 
by the uncompromising forces of his world, brutally murders 
his lover, the prostitute Marie. Herzog captures Buchner s 
grotesque cynicism in this portrayal of the anarchy and 
meaninglessness of a society bound to inhumane, archaic 
laws and morals. No rating. Plus: A featurette on the filming 
of "NOSFERATU— THE VAMPYRE" narrated by the di- 
rector. Werner Herzog. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID 
Free: Others $1.50. 

7:30 p.m. DURHAM YOUTH SYMPHONY and GREENSBORO 
YOUTH SYMPHONY Joint Concert. Page. Public is invited. 
Free. 

8:00 p.m. Friends of Duke Chapel Present Margaret Walker Alex- 
ander, poet and novelist. York Chapel. Public is invited. 

8:00 p.m. Perspectives on Aging Lecture Series. Speaker: Prof. 
Anne F. Scott. Searle Center. Medical Center. 

Wednesday. April 23 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
11:30 a.m. -11:50 a.m. Preaching Service led by Duke Divinity 

School Community. York Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
1:00-2:30 p.m. Political Science Department Colloquium. Speaker: 

Prof. Jerry Hough. Rm. 204 Perkins Library. 
3:30 p.m. DUKE LACROSSE: Duke vs. Washington & Lee 
4:00 p.m. Dept. of Anatomy Cell and Molecular Biology Training 

Grant Seminar. Speaker: Ueli Aebi. Rm. 273 Sands Bldg. 
4:15 p.m. Department of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Leslie 

Reinherz. Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 
7:00, 9:30 p.m. & Midnight Sigma Nu Movie: "TO KILL A 

MOCKING BIRD." $1.50. Bio. Sci. 
7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services Program: Chuck Holton. Jazz 

Piano and Synthesizer. Courtyard Dining Rm.. Hosp. Free. 
8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music: SENIOR RECITAL. Charles Jarrett, 

violinist; Leslie Lewis, violinist: Jane Hawkins, pianist. 

EDMR. Open to public. Free. 

Thursday, April 24 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 



11:30-11:50 a.m. Communion Service led by Duke Divinity School 
Community. York Chapel. 

12:00 Noon Dept. of Music: SENIOR RECITAL. Kenneth 
Zirkman, violin; Joseph Zirkman, piano. Open to public. 
Free. Reh. Hall M. D. Biddle Music Bldg. 

12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

1:30 p.m. DILR East Campus Tour of the East Campus. Begins at 
Campus Center. 

3:00 p.m. The Program in Quebec Studies and the Department of 
Sociology Colloquium. Speaker: Prof. Paul Bernard. Rm. 133 
Sociology-Psychology Bldg. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist, Episcopal, Memorial Chapel, Duke 
Chapel. 

7:00 p.m. Freewater Films: 'WRONG AGAIN'' (Early Screen 
Comedians). Dir. by Leo McCarey. Stars Laurel & Hardy. 
Marcel Marceau once wrote, "Stan Laurel was one of the 
great mimes of our time." This short proves it. Silent. Plus: 
"MODERN TIMES" Dir. by and stars Charlie Chaplin. As a 
factory worker, Charlie is confronted by the alienating world 
of the assembly line. The film, branded as pro-Red when 
released, did poor business, but is now counted among Chap- 
lin's classics. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free: Others 
$1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "TOYS IN THE ATTIC." Branson. 
$2.50. 

8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music: SENIOR RECITAL. Rose Anne Bow- 
den, piano. EDMR. Open to public. Free. 

9:30 p.m. Freewater Films: "FILM" (Early Screen Comedians). 
Dir. by Alan Schneider. Stars Buster Keaton. Written by 
Samuel Beckett, based on Berkeley's theory Esse est percipi, 
"to be is to be perceived"' — Keaton plays a man who cannot 
escape the problem of self-perception. Not typical Keaton, 
but definitely an unusual piece of work. Silent. Plus: "MOD- 
ERN TIMES." Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID Free; 
Others $1.50. 

Friday, April 25 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:00 Noon Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 

011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Robert Webster. 

Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Speaker: Paulette Peckol. Rm. 
144 Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

6:00 p.m. SPRING SEMESTER UNDERGRADUATE 
CLASSES END. 

7:00, 9:30, & Midnight Freewater Films: "ANDY WARHOLS 
DRACULA." Dir. by Paul Morrissey. Stars Joe Dalesandro, 
Udo Kier. In Warhol's version of Dracula, the old blood- 
sucker craves blood from only virgins, and virgins are in short 
supply — even in 1930 Italy. Plenty of sex and camp humor: 
the faint-of-heart would do best to stay away — blood is not in 
short supply. Rated X. Bio. Sci. Duke Undergrads w/ID 
Free; Others $1.50. 

7:30 p.m. DUU Major Attractions Presents THE DIXIE DREGS. 
Page Aud. $6.50. $5.50 Undergrads; $7.50, $6.50 Gen. Public. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "TOYS IN THE ATTIC." Branson. $3 
and $4. 

8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music: SENIOR RECITAL. LisaHaupert Bar- 
field, soprano; Cindy Hall, flute: Mark Parta, piano. EDMR. 
Open to public. Free. 

Saturday, April 26 

Through April 28th Saturday-Monday. Reading period (Under- 
graduate ) . 

Through May 22nd DUU Galleries Art Exhibit: Ruth Pinnell. West 

Campus Gallery. 
9:00 a.m. D. U. Program in Genetics: Mini-Symposium on Genetic 
Engineering. Gross Chem. Aud. 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

10:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. NEW GAMES FESTIVAL. East Campus. 

10:30 a.m. D. U. STRING SCHOOL ENSEMBLES. Dorothy 

Kitchen, Director. EDMR. Open to public. Free. 
2:00 p.m. DUKE LACROSSE: Duke vs. University of Baltimore. 



5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

7:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "ANNE HALL." Woody Allen as 
Alvy, a classic urban neurotic, meets Diane Keaton as Annie, 
who has not yet found her identity. Their relationship is 
hilarious, but Allen, in mature comic statement, is also saying 
something about the joy and pain of human contact. Endear- 
ing as well as witty, funny and inventive. Dir. Allen. In color. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "TOYS IN THE ATTIC." Branson. $3 & 
$4. 

8:45 p.m. "SLEEPER." Uproariously Inventive comedy. Woody 
Allen wakes up in the year 2173 after being frozen for 200 
years when an operation for an ulcer went wrong. In this 
hilariously futuristic, practically lobotomized authoritarian 
society, he must run for his life to survive as revolution and 
repression rage. A zillion laughs, sight gags, and satirical 
barbs at the 1973 Woody left behind. Diane Keaton. Dir. 
Allen. In Color. Page. $1.50. 

Sunday, April 27 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship, University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend B. Maurice Ritchie, Assistant Dean 
for Field Education and Student Services, Divinity School. 
The Service of Worship is Broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults; x /i price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

4:00 & 8:00 p.m. OPEN HOUSE DUKE OPERA WORKSHOP. 
John Hanks. Director. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center, 505 Alex- 
ander. A light supper is served following the service. 

6:00 p.m. Supper on the Terrace. Reh. Hall Biddle Music Bldg. 
Open to public. Free. 

7:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "ANNE HALL." Woody Allen as 
Alvy, a classic urban neurotic, meets Diane Keaton as Annie, 
who has not yet found her identity. Their relationship is 
hilarious, but Allen, in mature comic statement, is also saying 
something about the joy and pain of human contact. Endear- 
ing as well as witty, funny and inventive. Dir. Allen. In color. 

8:45 p.m. '"SLEEPER." Uproariously Inventive comedy. Woody 
Allen wakes up in the year 2173 after being frozen for 200 
years when an operation for an ulcer went wrong. In this 
hilariously futuristic, practically lobotomized authoritarian 
society, he must run for his life to survive as revolution and 
repression rage. A zillion laughs, sight gags, and satirical 
barbs at the 1973 Woody left behind. Diane Keaton. Dir. 
Allen. In Color. Page. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "TOYS IN THE ATTIC." Branson. 
$3 & $4. 

THE 7TH DOLLHOUSE INVITATIONAL 

The Duke University Union Galleries Committee 
presents the 7th Dollhouse Invitational in the West 
Campus Gallery, works by artists from California to 
Indiana to North Carolina are on display until April 
24th. The works are small, at most 11" x %V2 n in size, 
some are three-dimensional and free standing, and 
others are planar. All reveal the artists' subtle senses 
of humor. The Union Galleries Committee invites the 
public to see this exhibition. 

THE JURIED SHOW 
OF DUKE STUDENTS" ART 

The Duke University Union Galleries Committee 
presents the Juried Show of Duke Students" Art on 



display through May 12th in the East Campus Gallery . 
Works by Duke Students have been carried out in sev- 
eral different media. Come see these superb examples 
of the talent here at Duke! 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station. Durham, NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U. S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for S3. 50. payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station. 
Durham. NC 27706; telephone 684-5578. 



Deadline for the Calendar of April 27th-May 11th 
is Monday, April list, before 1:00 p.m. Please note 
this calendar is for two weeks. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 

SUMMER SESSION I CALENDAR 

Information for the calendar for Summer Session 
I is now due. This calendar will cover the entire six 
weeks period of the first summer session. May 15th 
through June 29th. The deadline is Monday, May 5th 
by 1:00 p.m. 



GRAND OPENING DUKE HOSPITAL NORTH 

The Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting Ceremonies 
for the North Division of Duke Hospital are scheduled 
for Sunday. April 20th, at 2:00 p.m. The ceremony will 
take place at the front entrance of the new hospital. 
Tours of the first and second floors will follow the 
ceremony. The entire university community is invited 
to attend. 

JUNIOR ORGAN RECITAL BY 
KIMBERLY MARSHALL 

The Department of Music is sponsoring a Junior 
Organ Recital by Kimberly Marshall on Sunday, April 
20th, at 4:00 p.m. in Duke Chapel. Ms. Marshall is a 
Junior at Duke. The program will include works by 



Johann Sebastian Bach. Jacques Charpentier. Cesar 
Franck and Marcel Dupre. The public is invited to this 
recital for which there is no charge. 

Ms. Marshall has just returned from France, where 
she was a student of Odile Bailleux in Paris, and Louis 
Robilliard in Lyon. She holds the top award in organ 
performance given by the Lyon Conservatory. Ms. 
Marshall is now preparing to enter the Chartres Inter- 
national Organ Competition to be held in Chartres 
Cathedral next September. Kimberly Marshall is a 
Morehead Scholar at UNC-Chapel Hill, working also 
at the Department of Music here at Duke. 

JOINT SENIOR RECITAL 
STEPHEN YANG AND CINDY HUTTON 

Pianist. Stephen Yang, and violinist, Cindy Hut- 
ton, will present a Joint Senior Recital for the Depart- 
ment of Music on Sunday evening, April 20th, at 8:15 
p.m. in the Rehearsal Hall of the Mary Duke Biddle 
Music Building on East Campus. Stephen Yang is a 
student of John Ruggero, and Cindy Hutton is a stu- 
dent of Giorgio Ciompi. The public is invited to this 
recital without charge. 

DURHAM CIVIC CHORAL SOCIETY CONCERT 

The Durham Civic Choral Society of the Durham 
Arts Council will present the Cherubim Requiem 
Mass in C Minor on Sunday, April 20th. at 8:15 p.m. 
in the Durham High School Auditorium. James Ogle, 
Associate Conductor of the North Carolina Sym- 
phony, will direct the concert. Also on the program 
will be music by Brahms, Hoist, Hanson, and 
Thompson. 

DUKE PLAYERS PRESENT 
•TOYS IN THE ATTIC 

The Duke Players bring a very successful 50th an- 
niversary season to a close with Lillian Hellman's 
Toys in the Attic. Eight performances are scheduled 
for Thursday through Sunday, April 17th-20th and 
April 24th-27th. Curtain time is 8:15 p.m. at Branson 
Theatre. 

Lillian Hellman, one of America's foremost play- 
wrights, has written twelve plays during a distin- 
guished career in which she has also been a top Hol- 
lywood screenwriter, an editor, and a highly contro- 
versial public figure. All of her plays demonstrate a 
keen insight into human nature and psychological 
weakness. 

Toys in the Attic is a serious drama centering around 
two spinster sisters, Anna and Carrie Berniers, who 
live in New Orleans. They have dreamed of visiting 
Europe but are constantly spending their meager sav- 
ings helping their younger brother. Julian, out of finan- 
cial difficulties. One day, Julian returns home, bringing 
elaborate and expensive gifts. Suspicions of illegal 
dealings arise as Julian sports his new-found wealth, 
and tensions mount as the characters struggle to adjust 
to Julian's unexpected independence. 

This final production of the 50th anniversary season 



is being directed by Duke Players Resident Scenic De- 
signer Ron Regier. Scenic and lighting design will be 
handled by Guest Designer Richard Harmon. Mr. 
Harmon holds an M.F.A. from N.Y.U. School of Arts 
and has designed over 35 productions, most recently 
Jesse and the Bandit Queen at the Impossible Ragtime 
Theatre in New York. Costumes for Toys in the Attic 
will be designed by Resident Costume Designer Do- 
reen Wetzel. 

Tickets at $4.00 Center Section, $3.00 Side Sections, 
and $2.50 for all Thursday Night seats are on sale now 
at Page Box Office. Tickets may also be purchased 
using Mastercharge or Visa by phoning Instantcharge 
at 684-3227 weekdays between the hours of 10 a.m. 
and 3 p.m. 

NEUROBEHAVIORAL SCIENCES RESEARCH 

TRAINING PROGRAM 

14TH ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM 

Drs. Ian Creese, Everett Ellinwood, Jr.. Pierre 
Flor-Henry, Philip Groves, Barry Jacobs, and Richard 
Wyatt will review special areas of the neurobiological 
basis of psychosis and animal models of psychosis at 
the "Neurobiological Basis of Psychosis" annual 
symposium being held Monday. April 21st, at 9:00 
a.m. -5:30 p.m. in the Searle Center Lecture Hall of the 
Medical Center Library. Discussions will focus on the 
conceptual issues that confront various neuroscience 
approaches to research on psychosis. 

UNIVERSITY REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING 

The University Review Committee on the Use of 
Human Subjects in Non-Medical Research will meet 
on Monday. April 21st, at 3:30 p.m. in the Board Room 
of Allen Building. All materials (copy of research pro- 
posal, completed protocol, and completed federal 
forms, if applicable) must be submitted to the com- 
mittee secretary, Robert Sawyer, 215 Allen Building, 
by noon on the Wednesday preceding the regular 
meeting. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

Joanne M. Werts. Department of Zoology will speak 
on "Sexual Preferences and Dominance Status in Ring 
Doves" for the Department of Zoology Seminar on 
Monday, April 21st, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Coffee and tea will be 
served at 4:00 p.m. 

NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY CONCERT 

The final concert of the North Carolina Symphony 
in Durham will be held in Page Auditorium on Mon- 
day, April 21st at 8:00 p.m. Admission is by season or 
single ticket. Single tickets are $6 for adults and $3 for 
students, senior citizens, and Symphony Society 
members. For more information, call Page Box Office 
at 684-4059. 

The Dvorak Cello Concerto in B minor performed 
by cellist Michele Djokic will highlight the concert 
with Artistic Director and Conductor John Gosling di- 
recting. The remainder of the concert will feature the 



Royal Fireworks Music by Handel and the Brahms 
Symphony No. 4 in E minor. 

Michele Djokic, at the age of 18, has become some- 
thing of a marvel. The Joseph M. Bryan Young Artists 
Competition in January, 1979 was the sixth consecu- 
tive contest to be won by Djokic. Her other triumphs 
include competitions at the New Jersey Symphony in 
1977: the Juilliard Competition in December of 1978: 
the Aspen Music Festival Competition in the summer 
of 1978, and a Trenton Symphony competition she 
entered while a pre-college student at Juilliard. She has 
studied with Joseph Druian of the Philadelphia Or- 
chestra and is currently studying with Leonard Rose 
and Channing Robbins at the Juilliard School. 

Now in his eighth season as Artistic Director and 
Conductor of the North Carolina Symphony, John 
Gosling led the orchestra in its premiere concerts in 
New York's Carnegie Hall in 1977; Washington" s John 
F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in April of 
1978: and in Chicago's Orchestra Hall in October of 
1978. The founder of "Music from Bear Valley," the 
music festival held each year in California's High 
Sierra mountains. Gosling was educated at the Juilliard 
School and the Catholic University of America. He 
also serves on the board of directors of the Conductors 
Guild of the American Symphony Orchestra League. 

GENETICS COLLOQUIUM 

Dr. Nicholas W. Gillham, Department of Zoology. 
will hold the third Genetics Colloquium in a series on 
Ciliate Genetics on Tuesday, April 22nd. at 12:30 p.m. 
in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. 

PLANT SYSTEMATICS 
AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR 

On Tuesday. April 22nd. at 12:30 p.m. in Room 130 
Biological Sciences, Ms. Deborah Langsam, will 
speak on "A revision of the genus Brevilegnia." Ms. 
Langsam is completing her doctoral studies, and will 
discuss the results of her thesis research. Although the 
genus Brevilegnia is a relatively small one among the 
watermolds, its species have long been variously in- 
terpreted and often misidentified. Ms. Langsam has 
produced the first world monograph on the genus. 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS SEMINAR 

Dr. Douglas W. Webbink of the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission will present a seminar on "Fre- 
quency Spectrum Deregulation: Or the Move Towards 
Spectrum Economic Markets," for the Department of 
Economics on Tuesday, April 22nd, at 12:30 p.m. in 
Room 214 Social Sciences Building. This seminar is 
open to the public. Attendees should bring their own 
"Brown Bag Lunch." 

PHARMACOLOGY STUDENT SEMINAR 

Les Carter will speak on "Pathogenesis and Phar- 
macology of African Trypanosoniasis" for the De- 
partment of Pharmacology Student Seminar on Tues- 
day, April 22nd at 4:00 p.m. in Room 408 of the 
Nanaline H. Duke Building. 



GREAT DECISIONS 80 LECTURE SERIES 

The sixth Great Decisions '80 Lecture will be given 
on Tuesday. April 22nd, at 4:30 p.m. in the auditorium 
of the Gross Chemistry Building. Arturo A. Valen- 
zuela. Associate Professor, Political Science, will 
speak on 'Brazil's Rising Power: What Weight in the 
World Scale?" for the Duke Institute for Learning in 
Retirement. 



EPISCOPAL WORSHIP SERVICES 

As of last week the Tuesday evening Eucharist has 
been moved to the East Campus Center. This move is 
designed to make services more available to students 
living on East Campus, but it is hoped that the entire 
university community will take advantage of these 
services. The services will be at 5:15 p.m. in the front 
room of the East Campus Center (next to the tennis 
courts). 

The Thursday evening service will be continued in 
Duke Chapel on West Campus and Sunday evening 
will be at the Episcopal Center on Central Campus at 
505 Alexander Avenue. All services are at 5:15 p.m. 



DURHAM/GREENSBORO YOUTH SYMPHONY 
JOINT CONCERT 

The Durham Youth Symphony will join with the 
Greensboro Youth Symphony in a joint concert on 
Tuesday, April 22nd. at 7:30 p.m. in Page Auditorium. 
The public is invited to this concert for which there is 
no charge. 

Featured in the program will be the winners of the 
Durham Symphony Concerto Competition: Erich 
Huang, Sabrina Boswell. Bettina Lauf, and Francesca 
Mulvihill. These four will present two movements of 
the Bach Double Concerto in D minor. Runners-up in 
this competition were Perry Havighurst and Eugenie 
Huang. 

Also included on the program will be the Royal 
Fireworks Music by Handel, a Schubert Overture, and 
Benjamin Britten's Simple Symphony. George Taylor 
will guest conduct the Bach, and Dorothy Kitchen will 
conduct the Britten. Paul Bryan is the conductor of the 
Durham Youth Symphony and Peter Wilson the 
Greensboro Youth Symphony. 



FRIENDS OF DUKE CHAPEL PRESENT 
MARGARET WALKER ALEXANDER 

Friends of Duke Chapel present Margaret Walker 
Alexander, the distinguished poet and novelist, on 
Tuesday, April 22nd, at 8:00 p.m. in York Chapel. Ms. 
Alexander is the well-known author of Jubilee, the 
beloved and celebrated story of her people. She has 
also written several books of poetry, including some 
she and Nikki Giovanni co-authored. She will read 
some of her poetry from her book now being pub- 
lished. This Is My Century. 



PERSPECTIVES ON 
AGING LECTURE SERIES 

Anne F. Scott, Professor of History, will speak on 
'Old Wives' Tales" on Tuesday. April 22nd at 8:00 
p.m. in the Searle Center, Duke University Medical 
Center. Professor Scott's lecture is the final lecture in 
a series on Perspectives on Aging sponsored by the 
Center for the Study of Aging and Human Develop- 
ment in cooperation with Colonial Penn Group, Inc. 
Please contact Betty Ray, Box 3003, Duke University 
Medical Center, Durham, N. C. 27710 (telephone 
684-2248) for free tickets. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
DEPARTMENT COLLOQUIUM 

Professor Jerry Hough will speak on "Soviet 
Foreign Policy Debates" for the Political Science De- 
partment Colloquium Series on Wednesday, April 
23rd, from 1:00 to 2:30 p.m. in Room 204 Perkins Li- 
brary. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY/CELL AND 
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY TRAINING SEMINAR 

Ueli Aebi, Department of Cell Biology and 
Anatomy. Johns Hopkins Medical School, Baltimore. 
Maryland will speak on '"Identification of Subunits 
and Antibody Labels by Electron Microscopy and 
Image Processing" for the Department of Anatomy 
and the Cell and Molecular Biology Training Grant 
Seminar on Wednesday, April 23rd, at 4:00 p.m. in 
Room 273 Sands Building. Coffee and cookies will be 
served at 3:45 p.m. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

Leslie Reinherz, Department of Zoology will speak 
on 'Courtship in the Zebra Finch or Does Familiarity 
Breed Variability'.'" for the Department of Zoology 
Seminar on Wednesday, April 23rd, at 4:15 p.m. in 
Room 111 of the Biological Sciences Building. Coffee 
and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

SENIOR RECITAL BY CHARLES JARRETT 

The Department of Music is sponsoring a senior re- 
cital by Charles Jarrett. violinist, with Leslie Lewis, 
violinist, and Jane Hawkins, pianist, on Wednesday. 
April 23rd at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. 
The public is invited to this recital for which there is no 
admission charge. 

SENIOR RECITAL BY KENNETH ZIRKMAN 

Kenneth Zirkman. violinist, will present his Senior 
Recital which is sponsored by the Department of 
Music on Thursday, April 24th. at 12:00 Noon in re- 
hearsal Hall of the Mary Duke Biddle Music Building. 
Joseph Zirkman, pianist, will assist in the program 
which will include works by J. S. Bach, Antonin 
Dvorak, W. A. Mozart and Fritz Kreisler. The public 
is invited to this recital without charge. 



DILR EAST CAMPUS TOUR 

The Duke Institute for Learning in Retirement will 
conduct a tour of East Campus led by Dr. and Mrs. 
Luther Gobble. The tour will begin at the Campus 
Center on Thursday, April 24th. at 1:30 p.m. 

THE PROGRAM IN QUEBEC STUDIES AND 
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

The Program in Quebec Studies and the Department 
of Sociology will sponsor a colloquium by Professor 
Paul Bernard of the Department of Sociology, Univer- 
sity of Montreal, on Thursday, April 24th at 3:00 p.m. 
in Room 133 Sociology-Psychology Building. The title 
of Professor Bernard's presentation is "Linguistic 
Stratification in Quebec: Trends and Policies." A re- 
ception will follow. The public is cordially invited. 

SENIOR RECITAL BY ROSE ANNE BOWDEN 

Pianist, Rose Anne Bowden, will present her Senior 
Recital which is sponsored by the Department of 
Music on Thursday evening, April 24th, at 8: 15 p.m. in 
the East Duke Music Room. Miss Bowden is a senior 
music major from Henderson, North Carolina. A. 
W. N. Reynolds Scholar, Miss Bowden has studied 
piano and organ at Duke and is presently studying 
piano with Mr. Loren Withers. Miss Bowden is a 
four-year member of the Duke University Chapel 
Choir, and has served on the workshop committee of 
the Duke University Parish Ministry and the Parish 
Ministry Advisory Council. 

The program which is open to the public without 
charge will include piano works by Bartok. Beeth- 
oven, Brahms, Chopin, Liszt, and Scarlatti. 

BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR 

Dr. Robert Webster, Department of Biochemistry, 
will speak on "Bacteriophage F 1 : Genetics, Structure 
and Thoughts on Morphogenesis" for the Department 
of Biochemistry Seminar on Friday, April 25th, at 
12:30 p.m. in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. 
Coffee will be served at 12:15 p.m. in the lobby. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Paulette Peckol, Graduate Student, Department of 
Botany, will speak on "'In Search of the Wild Sea- 
weed: Effects of Seasonality on Population Growth. 
Survival, and Reproduction" for the Plant Ecology 
Seminar on Friday, April 25th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 
144 Biological Sciences Building. 

DUU MAJOR ATTRACTIONS PRESENTS 
THE DIXIE DREGS 

The Duke University Union Major Attractions 
Committee presents The Dixie Dregs on Friday. April 
25th, at 7:30 p.m. in Page Auditorium. The Dixie Dregs 
combine rock, jazz, country, and classical music in an 
amplified sound which Dregs guitarist describes as 
'"electric chamber music." Tickets for the concert 



priced at S6.50. $5.50 for undergraduates and $7.50, 
$6.50 for the general public may be purchased between 
the hours of 9:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m.. Monday through Fri- 
day at Page Box Office. 



SENIOR RECITAL BY 
LISA HAUPERT BARFIELD 

Lisa Haupert Barfield, soprano, will present a senior 
recital which is sponsored by the Department of Music 
on Friday. April 25th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke 
Music Room. She will be assisted by Mark Parta, 
pianist, and Cindy Hall, flutist. The program includes 
vocal pieces by Bach, Handel, Schumann, Enrique 
Granados, and Jack Jarrett. The public is invited to 
this recital for which there is no charge. 

MINI-SYMPOSIUM ON 
GENETIC ENGINEERING 

The D. U. Program in Genetics is sponsoring a 
Mini-Symposium on Genetic Engineering on Saturday, 
April 26th, in the Gross Chemistry Auditorium. The 
program is as follows: 

Moderator Dr. Paul Modrich 

9 a.m. Dr. Clyde Hutchison 

University of North Carolina 
Site-directed mutagenesis 

10 a.m. Dr. James Hicks 

Cold Spring Habor Laboratory 

Transformation in yeast and the cloning of mating 

type cassettes 

11 a.m. Break-coffee and refreshments 

12 Noon Dr. Dean Hamer 

National Institutes of Health 

Expression of eukaryotic genes cloned in SV40 

1 p.m. Dr. Virginia Walbot 

Washington University 

Unsolved problems in plant molecular biology 

2 p.m. Concluding remarks and discussion 

3 p.m. Barbecue-East Campus Gazebo. 
For further information, call 684-5546. 



NEW GAMES FESTIVAL 

A New Games Festival is a time of fun, games, and 
relaxation for the entire Duke Community. Those at- 
tending are invited to bring friends, family, and a pic- 
nic lunch to eat on the lawn at the festival on Saturday, 
April 26th from 10:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. on the East Cam- 
pus. Play and picnic areas will be centered around 
Hanes field, facing Broad Street and the A&P. The 
rain date will be Sunday, April 27th from 1:00 p.m.- 
5:00 p.m. Play familiar games like frisbee and vol- 
leyball, or learn New Games such as Prui, Vampire, 
Hug Tab, Annihilation or Blob will be played. There 
are games for everyone. New Games is co-sponsored 
by Project WILD, ASDU, Residential Federations, 
Wilson House, and the Office of Student Affairs. 



D. U. STRING SCHOOL ENSEMBLES 
SPRING CONCERT 

The Duke University String School Ensembles will 
give their Spring Concert under the direction of 
Dorothy Kitchen on Saturday morning. April 26th, in 
the East Duke Music Room. This program, which was 
originally announced to begin at 3:00 p.m.. will begin 
instead at 10:30 a.m. Parents and children are urged to 
attend this concert for which there is no charge. 

OPEN HOUSE DUKE OPERA WORKSHOP 

"Open House at the Opera Workshop" will be pre- 
sented by The Duke University Opera Ensemble under 
the direction of John Hanks on Sunday, April 27th. 
Performances of both acts and scenes from operas will 
begin at 4:00 p.m. and continue at 8:00 p.m. in the 
Rehearsal Hall of the Mary Duke Biddle Music Build- 
ing on East Campus. Louis Auld is Stage Director for 
the Workshop. 

Included in the evening's program will be selections 
from Hansel and Gretel by Humperdinck; Madam 
Butterfly by Puccini; the Old Maid and the Thief by 
Menotti: // Barbiere di Siviglia by Rossini; Die 
Zauberflote by Mozart; Pagliacci by Leoncavallo: Le 
Nozze di Figaro by Mozart; Fidelia by Beethoven: 
and La Traviata by Verdi. 

At 6:00 p.m. there will be a supper on the terrace. 
Those attending are invited to pack picnic baskets with 
food and drink and join the opera ensemble during 
intermission. The public is invited to an afternoon and 
evening at the opera without charge. 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES IN 
MAY COMMENCEMENT 

A memorandum to each candidate for a degree to be 
conferred on May 1 1 , 1980, was mailed from the Office 
of the University Marshal on March the 3rd. This 
memorandum gave directions for reserving academic 
apparel, an order of events for the Commencement 
Weekend, and information about the procuring of en- 
graved invitations and tickets. Any degree candidate 
not receiving the memorandum should consult im- 
mediately the Office of the University Marshal, 353 
Gross Chemical Laboratory, (684-6029), to be certain 
that a diploma has been ordered and that the office has 
an address for a second mailing in April. 

DUKE HOMESITES— HOUSES FOR SALE 

Only those homes located on lots originally de- 
veloped and sold by the University and which are still 
owned by a member of the faculty or staff of the Uni- 
versity will be listed in the University Calendar. Call 
Fred E. Miller at extension 2054 for information re- 
garding listings. Call the appropriate number listed 



below for information regarding a particular house. 

Location: 2417 Wrightwood 

Phone: 489-7761 

Number of Bedrooms: Five (5) 

Number of Baths: Two (2) 

Type of heating/air conditioning: Gas Heat/Central air 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Ms. Ana Marie Beamud for the Ph.D. 
degree in Romance Languages was held on Thursday. April 15th. 
The subject of Ms. Beamud's dissertation was "The Invisible Icon: 
Poetry About Portraiture in the Spanish Golden Age." The com- 
mittee conducting the examination consisted of Professors Bruce 
Wardropper, presiding, John Fein, Richard L. Predmore, Patrick 
Vincent, and Duncan T. Kinkead. 



The final examination of Ms. Teresa Ann Scott Soufas for the 
Ph.D. degree in Romance Languages was held on Friday, April 16th. 
The subject of Ms. Soufas" dissertation was "Dreams, Nightmares, 
and Swoons: Calderon and Ancient Psychology."' The committee 
conducting the examination consisted of Professors Bruce War- 
dropper, presiding, Rafael Osuna. Richard L. Predmore, and Dun- 
can T. Kinkead. 



The final examination of Mr. Dennis Michael Hanratty for the 
Ph.D. degree in Political Science will be held on Friday. April 21st at 
9:00 a.m. in Room 214 Perkins Library. The subject of Mr. Han- 
ratty's dissertation is "Change and Conflict in the Contemporary 
Mexican Catholic Church." The committee to conduct the exami- 
nation consists of Professors Arturo Valenzuela, presiding, R. 
Taylor Cole, John H. Hallowell. Sheridan Johns, and Robert T. 
Osbom. 

The final examination of Ms. Elizabeth Stevens Prioleau for the 
Ph.D. degree in English will be held on Monday. April 21st at 3:15 
p.m. in Room 328 Allen Building. The subject of Ms. Prioleau's 
dissertation is '"The Circle of Eros: Sexuality in the Work of W. D. 
Howells." The committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors Edwin H. Cady, presiding. Buford Jones, Bernard I. 
Duffey. Carl Anderson, and Gerald Monsman. 



The final examination of Mr. Marc David Rafal for the Ph.D. 
degree in Electrical Engineering will be held on Monday, April 21st 
at 3:00 p.m. The subject of Mr. Rafal's dissertation is "Optimization 
of the Six-Port Technique for Measuring Complex Reflection Coef- 
ficient. " The committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors William Joines, presiding, Henry A. Owens, Rhett T. 
George, Peter N. Marinos, and Merrell L. Patrick. 



The final examination of Ms. Sarah Stanbury Smith for the Ph.D. 
degree in English will be held on Tuesday. April 22nd at 3:15 p.m. in 
Room 328 Allen Building. The subject of Ms. Smith's dissertation is 
"Fayre Formez: Image and Vision in the Works of Gawain-Poel." 
The committee to conduct the examination consists of Professors A. 
Leigh DeNeef. presiding, Holger O. Nygard, Dale B. Randall. 
George W. Williams, and Wallace Jackson. 



The final examination of Ms. Mary Alletta Wheeler for the Ph.D. 
degree in Psychology will be held on Tuesday. April 22 at 9:00 a.m. 
in Room 222 Sociology-Psychology Bldg. The subject of Ms. 
Wheeler's dissertation is "Mothers' Speech in Context: Age 
Changes and Language Lessons." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Carol Eckerman, presiding, 
Lloyd Borstelmann, Norman Guttman, Lise Wallach, and Naomi 
Quinn. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR (USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR- 




April 27-May 11, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published April 25. 1980 



Number 28 



Sunday, April 27 

Through April 28th Tuesday-Monday. Reading period (Graduate). 
Through April 28th Saturday-Monday. Reading period (Under- 
graduate). 
Through May 12th DUU Galleries Art Exhibit: Student Juried 

Show. 
Through May 30th DUU Galleries Art Exhibit: Ruth Pinnell. West 
Campus Gallery. 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship, University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend B. Maurice Ritchie, Assistant Dean 
for Field Education and Student Services, Divinity School. 
The Service of Worship is Broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
1 1 :30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults; '/i price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

4:00 & 8:00 p.m. OPEN HOUSE DUKE OPERA WORKSHOP. 
John Hanks. Director. 6:00 p.m. Supper on the Terrace. Reh. 
Hall Biddle Music Bldg. Open to public. Free. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist (Episcopal). Student Center, 505 Alex- 
ander. A light supper is served following the service. 

7:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "ANNE HALL," Woody Allen as 
Alvy, a classic urban neurotic, meets Diane Keaton as Annie, 
who has not yet found her identity. Their relationship is 
hilarious, but Allen, in mature comic statement, is also saying 
something about the joy and pain of human contact. Endear- 
ing as well as witty, funny and inventive. Dir. Allen. In color. 

8:45 p.m. "SLEEPER." Uproariously Inventive comedy. Woody 
Allen wakes up in the year 2173 after being frozen for 200 
years when an operation for an ulcer went wrong. In this 
hilariously futuristic, practically lobotomized authoritarian 
society, he must run for his life to survive as revolution and 
repression rage. A zillion laughs, sight gags, and satirical 
barbs at the 1973 Woody left behind. Diane Keaton. Dir. 
Allen. In Color. Page. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players: "TOYS IN THE ATTIC." Branson. $3 & 
$4. 

Monday, April 28 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. An Informal Demonstration on Hewlett- 
Packard Desktop Computers. Rm. 1 15A Engineering Bldg. 
Open to the public. 

4:15 p.m. Dept. of Zoology Seminar. Speaker: Prof. Eric J. Den- 
ton. Rm. Ill Bio. Sci. Bldg. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "AGATHA." Fictionalized 
account of mystery writer Agatha Christie's unexplained 
eleven day disappearance in 1926. Entertaining star perfor- 
mances, plenty of period mood, but story of the author's 
despair and her bizarre plan takes a preposterous turn. Van- 
essa Redgrave, Dustin Hoffman. Dir. Michael Atted. Page. 
$1.50. 

8:15 p.m. Dept. of Music: FACULTY AND GUEST RECITAL. 
Mary Turner, piano; Sang Ei Kim, soprano. EDMR. Open to 
public. Free. 



Tuesday, April 29 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS BEGIN. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

12:30 p.m. Genetics Colloquium. Speaker: Dr. Nicholas W. Gill- 
ham. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
4:00 p.m. Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Eric Simon. Rm. 

147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
5:15 p.m. Episcopal Holy Eucharist. East Campus Center. 
7:00 & 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "MOONRAKER." James 
Bond turns spaceman to track villain out to destroy the 
world. Sumptuously produced and photographed, and loaded 
with the special effects and gimmicks 007 fans expect. 
Crammed with spectacular action. Roger Moore, Lois Chiles, 
Michael Lonsdale, Richard Kiel. Dir. Lewis Gilbert. Page. 
$1.50. 

Wednesday, April 30 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "SUPERMAN." Splashy, 
noisy comic strip spectacle loaded with special effects. Fun 
and humor when Superman zooms into action. Christopher 
Reeve just right as the flying hero; Margo Kidder sparkles as 
Lois Lane. Marlon Brando, Gene Hackman. Dir. Richard 
Donner. (PG) Page. $1.50. 

Thursday, May 1 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist, Episcopal, Memorial Chapel, Duke 
Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "BEDAZZLED." Faust 
story with a fresh, mod look in witty, crusty, comedy about 
fumbling London restaurant worker who sells soul to devil in 
exchange for becoming a man of the world. Inventive acting, 
irreverent humor, stylist direction. Peter Cook, Dudley 
Moore, Eleanor Bron, Raquel Welch. Dir. Stanley Donen. 
Page. $1.50. 

8:15 p.m. The American Association of University Professors 
Spring Meeting. Speakers: Chancellor Kenneth Pye and 
Professor Irving T. Diamond. Zener Aud. 130 Sociology- 
Psychology Bldg. Open to the public. 

Friday, May 2 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 
011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "SINGIN' IN THE 
RAIN." Classic musical kidding silent movie Hollywood 
(1928). Gene Kelly, Jean Hagen, Donald O'Connor, Debbie 
Reynolds. Dirs. Kelly and Stanley Donen. Page. $1.50. 

Saturday, May 3 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

5:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 

7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: "SINGIN' IN THE 
RAIN." Classic musical kidding silent movie Hollywood 
(1928). Gene Kelly, Jean Hagen, Donald O'Connor, Debbie 
Reynolds. Dirs. Kelly and Stanley Donen. Page. $1.50. 



Sunday, May 4 

9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship. University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Robert T. Young. The Service of 
Worship is Broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Magnolia Room, East Cam- 
pus Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families and guests. 
$3.50 adults: '/i price children under 12. Wine service avail- 
able after 1:00 p.m. 
11:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Sunday Dinner in Oak Room, West Campus 
Union. Open for faculty, staff, their families & guests. Wine 
Service available after 1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist, Episcopal. Episcopal Student Center. 
505 Alexander Avenue. 

Monday, May 5 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS END. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

Tuesday, May 6 

Beginning this day. Summer Drop/Adds must be approved by 

academic dean or director of graduate studies. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
4:00-5:00 p.m. DU Council on Aging and Human Development 
Seminar. Speaker: Mary L. C. Bernheim. Ph.D. Rm. 1504. 
Gerontology Bldg. 
4:30 p.m. Great Decisions '80 Lecture Series. Speaker: Robert F. 
Conrad. Gross Chem. Aud. 

Wednesday, May 7 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

Thursday, May 8 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 

4:00 p.m. Department of Pharmacology Seminar. Speaker: Prof. 
Rubin Bressler. Rm. 147 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

Friday, May 9 

LAST DAY FOR PAYMENT OF FEES FOR SUMMER SESSION 

TERM I. 
9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
12:30 p.m. Catholic Mass. Newman Center. 
12:30 p.m. Dept. of Biochemistry/ Medical Scientists Training Pro- 
gram Joint Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Janice Pero. Rm. 147 
Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 
1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 

011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 
8:30 p.m. Hoof V Horn presents -FIDDLER ON THE ROOF." 
Page Aud. Tickets S4. $5. and $6 Reserved Seating at Page 
Box Office. 

Saturday, May 10 
COMMENCEMENT BEGINS. 

9:00 a.m. Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

10:00-11:00 a.m. Guided tours of the campus. Buses leave from the 
University Chapel at these hours. 

2:00 p.m. DUKE LACROSSE: Duke vs. Drexel University. 

3:00 p.m. Baccalaureate Service for candidates whose surnames 
begin with letters A through G. University Chapel. Sermon 
by W. Kenneth Goodson. D.D.. L.H.D.. LL.D. Resident 
Bishop. Richmond Area, The United Methodist Church. 
(Admission of guests by green tickets only.) The procession 
of candidates for each baccalaureate service begins ten min- 
utes prior to the announced hour. 

4:30-6:00 p.m. Informal Reception honoring the graduating 
classes. East Duke Lawn. East Campus. (East Campus 
Union in case of rain). Music by the Duke University Wind 
Symphony. Paul R. Bryan. Professor of Music. Conductor. 

6:00 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 



8:30 p.m. Hoof n' Horn presents "FIDDLER ON THE ROOF." 

Page Aud. Tickets $4, $5, and S6 Reserved Seating at Page 

Box Office. 
9:00 p.m. Demonstration Recital by Fenner Douglass, Professor of 

Music and University Organist. Benjamin N. Duke Memorial 

Organ. University Chapel. 

SPECIAL CEREMONIES 

9:00 a.m. AFROTC COMMISSIONING EXERCISES. School of 

Law. 
10:30 a.m. THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Hippocratic Oath 

Ceremony. University Chapel. 
11:00 a.m. NROTC Commissioning Exercises. Courtroom, School 
of Law. Speaker: Rear Admiral Austin B. Scott. Jr. 

12:30 p.m. THE SCHOOL OF NURSING Recognition Service. 
University Chapel. 

4:00 p.m. THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Hippocratic Oath Re- 
ception. Searle Center, Seeley G. Mudd Bldg. 

4:15 p.m. JEWISH BACCALAUREATE CEREMONY Bac- 
calaureate Service for Jewish Students. Music Room, East 
Duke Bldg. 

5:30 p.m. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMIN- 
ISTRATION Special Ceremony. Auditorium. Paul M. Gross 
Chemical Laboratory. 

6:00 p.m. THE SCHOOL OF NURSING Reception. Mary Duke 
Biddle Music Bldg. 

6:00-7:30 p.m. THE SCHOOL OF LAW Reception. South Por- 
tico. Paul M. Gross Chemical Laboratory. 

6:30-8:00 p.m. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION Reception. Lobby, Paul M. Gross 
Laboratory. 

7:00 p.m. THE DIVINITY SCHOOL Baccalaureate Service of 
Worship. University Chapel. 

Sunday, May 11 

GRADUATION EXERCISES, CONFERRING OF DEGREES. 

8:30 a.m. Baccalaureate Service for candidates whose surnames 
begin with letters H through O. Sermon by Bishop Goodson. 
(Admission of guests by blue tickets only.) The procession of 
candidates for each baccalaureate service begins ten minutes 
prior to the announced hour. 

9:00 a.m. & 12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass. York Chapel. 
10:30 a.m. Baccalaureate Service for candidates whose surnames 
begin with letters P through Z. Sermon by Bishop Goodson. 
(Admission of guests by buff tickets only.) The procession of 
candidates for each baccalaureate service begins ten minutes 
prior to the announced hour. 

2:00 p.m. Graduation Exercises. East Campus Quadrangle (out- 
door seating). Conferring of degrees by Terry Sanford. Presi- 
dent of Duke University. (If weather conditions necessitate 
moving the exercises indoors, to the Edmund M. Cameron 
Indoor Stadium, admission of guests will be b\ ticket only. 
Those without tickets will be admitted to Page Auditorium 
where the exercises will be broadcast.) The procession of 
candidates for the graduation exercises begins twenty min- 
utes before the announced hour. 

2:00-5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

DISTRIBUTION OF DIPLOMAS 

(Immediatelv following the Graduation Exercises) 

TRINITY COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES— A.B.. B.S.. 

East Campus Quadrangle. 
THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING— B.S.E.. University Chapel. 

Reception in Chapel Courtyard. 
THE SCHOOL OF NURSING— B.S.N. , M.S.N., Museum of Art, 

East Campus. 
THE SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND ENVIRONMENTAL 

STUDIES— M.E.M.. M.F.. Auditorium. Biological Sciences 

Bldg. Reception in Lobby. 
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMIN- 
ISTRATION— M.M.. M.B.A.. Room 111. Social Science 

Bldg. 
THE DIVINITY SCHOOL— M.Div.. Th.M.. M.R.E., Asbury 

United Methodist Church. 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW— LL.B.. J.D., M.C.L.. LL.M., Page Au- 
ditorium. 

THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE— B.H.S., M.D., Music Room. 
East Duke Bldg. (In the event of rain. Intramural Bldg.. West 
Campus.) 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL— M.A.T., M.Ed.. M.H.A.. M.S.. 
A.M., Room 134, The Edmund M. Cameron Indoor Stadium. 
Ed.D.. Ph.D.. Lobby, Paul M. Gross Chemical Laboratory 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

The Duke University Calendar (USPS 162-120) is 
published weekly during the Fall and Spring terms 
when school is in session and once during each of 
the three Summer sessions by Duke University, 
Box KM Duke Station, Durham. NC 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 

The format covers a Sunday through Sunday time 
period. The calendar is distributed on campus and 
through the U.S. mail on Thursday and Friday of 
each week. 

Notices for publication in the Calendar should be 
typewritten, double-spaced, signed by the person 
submitting information, and should give a contact 
telephone extension. 

Deadline for submission of copy to the Calendar 
Office, 108 Page Building, is Monday afternoon be- 
fore 1:00 p.m. (Deadline exceptions are made in re- 
spect to holidays and are noted in the Calendar.) This 
deadline is absolutely necessary in order to maintain 
the publication and distribution schedule. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar are avail- 
able by sending a check for $3.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station. 
Durham, NC 27706: telephone 684-5578. 



SUMMER SESSION I CALENDAR 

Information for the calendar for Summer Session 
I is now due. This calendar will cover the entire six 
weeks period of the first summer session, May 15 th 
through June 29th. The deadline is Monday, May 5th 
by 1:00 p.m. 

Copies of the Duke University Weekly Calendar 
are available at Flowers Information Desk. 



NEW GAMES FESTIVAL 

A New Games Festival is a time of fun, games, and 
relaxation for the entire Duke Community. Those at- 
tending are invited to bring friends, family, and a pic- 
nic lunch to eat on the lawn at the festival on Saturday, 
April 26th from 10:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. on the East Cam- 
pus. Play and picnic areas will be centered around 
Hanes field, facing Broad Street and the A&P. The 
rain date will be Sunday, April 27th from 1:00 p.m.- 
5:00 p.m. Play familiar games like frisbee and vol- 
leyball, or learn New Games such as Prui. Vampire, 
Hug Tab, Annihilation or Blob will be played. There 
are games for everyone. New Games is co-sponsored 
by Project WILD, ASDU, Residential Federations, 
Wilson House, and the Office of Student Affairs. 



THE JURIED SHOW 
OF DUKE STUDENTS - ART 

The Duke University Union Galleries Committee 
presents the Juried Show of Duke Students' Art on 
display through May 12th in the East Campus Gallery. 
Works by Duke Students have been carried out in sev- 
eral different media. 

PHOTOGRAPHS BY RUTH PINNELL 

The Duke University Union Galleries presents an 
exhibition of black and white photographs from two 
portfolios by Ruth Pinnell in the West Campus Gallery 
from April 26th through May 30th. There will be a 
reception for the artist on Saturday, April 26th from 7 
to 9 p.m. in the West Gallery. The university commu- 
nity is invited to attend and talk with the artist. 



OPEN HOUSE DUKE OPERA WORKSHOP 

"Open House at the Opera Workshop"' will be pre- 
sented by The Duke University Opera Ensemble under 
the direction of John Hanks on Sunday, April 27th. 
Performances of both acts and scenes from operas will 
begin at 4:00 p.m. and continue at 8:00 p.m. in the 
Rehearsal Hall of the Mary Duke Biddle Music Build- 
ing on East Campus. Louis Auld is Stage Director for 
the Workshop. 

Included in the evening's program will be selections 
from Hansel and Gretel by Humperdinck; Madam 
Butterfly by Puccini; the Old Maid and the Thief by 
Menotti; // Barbiere di Siviglia by Rossini: Die 
Zauberflote by Mozart: Pagliacci by Leoncavallo; Le 
Nozze di Figaro by Mozart; Fidelio by Beethoven: 
and La Traviata by Verdi. 

At 6:00 p.m. there will be a supper on the terrace. 
Those attending are invited to pack picnic baskets with 
food and drink and join the opera ensemble during 
intermission. The public is invited to an afternoon and 
evening at the opera without charge. 

DUKE PLAYERS PRESENT 
'TOYS IN THE ATTIC' 

The Duke Players bring a very successful 50th an- 
niversary season to a close with Lillian Hellman's 
Toys in the Attic. The final performances are 
scheduled for Thursday through Sunday, April 24th- 
27th. Curtain time is 8:15 p.m. at Branson Theatre. 

Lillian Hellman, one of America's foremost play- 
wrights, has written twelve plays during a distin- 
guished career in which she has also been a top Hol- 
lywood screenwriter, an editor, and a highly contro- 
versial public figure. All of her plays demonstrate a 
keen insight into human nature and psychological 
weakness. 

Toys in the Attic is a serious drama centering around 
two spinster sisters, Anna and Carrie Berniers, who 
live in New Orleans. They have dreamed of visiting 
Europe but are constantly spending their meager sav- 
ings helping their younger brother, Julian, out of finan- 
cial difficulties. One day, Julian returns home, bringing 



elaborate and expensive gifts. Suspicions of illegal 
dealings arise as Julian sports his new-found wealth, 
and tensions mount as the characters struggle to adjust 
to Julian"s unexpected independence. 

This final production of the 50th anniversary season 
is being directed by Duke Players Resident Scenic De- 
signer Ron Regier. Scenic and lighting design will be 
handled by Guest Designer Richard Harmon. Mr. 
Harmon holds an M.F.A. from N.Y.U. School of Arts 
and has designed over 35 productions, most recently 
Jesse and the Bandit Queen at the Impossible Ragtime 
Theatre in New York. Costumes for Toys in the Attic 
will be designed by Resident Costume Designer Do- 
reen Wetzel. 

Tickets at $4.00 Center Section, $3.00 Side Sections, 
and $2.50 for all Thursday Night seats are on sale now 
at Page Box Office. Tickets may also be purchased 
using Mastercharge or Visa by phoning Instantcharge 
at 684-3227 weekdays between the hours of 10 a.m. 
and 3 p.m. 

AN INFORMAL DEMONSTRATION ON 
HEWLETT-PACKARD DESKTOP COMPUTERS 

An informal demonstration on Hewlett-Packard 
(85A, 9815A, 9825A, 9835A and 9845T) Desktop Com- 
puters and their applications will be given in Room 
1 15A of the Engineering Building between 9 a.m. and 5 
p.m. on Monday, April 28th. This demonstration is 
sponsored by the Department of Electrical Engineer- 
ing. Anyone interested is invited to attend. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

Professor Eric J. Denton, FRS, The Laboratory of 
the Marine Biological Association, Plymouth, Eng- 
land, will speak on "Hearing in Clupeid Fishes" for 
the Department of Zoology Seminar on Monday, April 
28th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 of the Biological Sci- 
ences Building. Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 
p.m. 

Professor Denton is a distinguished scientist who 
during most of his professional life has been associated 
with the Laboratory of the Marine Biological Associa- 
tion at Plymouth, where he is now Director. He is 
widely known for his many contributions to the under- 
standing of buoyancy problems of marine animals. 
More recently he has turned his attention to problems 
of sensory physiology, which is analyzing with his 
usual keen sense of what is important for the living 
animal in nature. 

FACULTY AND GUEST RECITAL BY 
MARY TURNER AND SANG EI KIM 

The final recital of the Department of Music's 
academic year will be held on Monday evening, April 
28th, at 8:15 p.m. in the East Duke Music Room. The 
faculty and guest recital by Mary Turner, pianist, and 
Sang Ei Kim, soprano, will also feature a string wind, 
brass, and harpsichord ensemble. The program which 
is open to the public without charge follows: 



Recitative and Aria from The Creation Joseph Haydn 

"Ridente La Calma" from Daniel Jdger Wolfgang Mozart 

Motet, K. 165 — Exsultale, Jubilate Wolfgang Mozart 

Philip Bromberg and Matthew Gillman, violins 

Charles Jarrett, viola 

Richard Clark, cello 

Jane Gabin, contrabass 

David Howell and Nancy Wilson, oboes 

Edward Bostley and Sally Bostley, horns 

Ruth Goldstein, harpsichord 

Five Bagatelles for piano Walter Saul 

Sonata in d minor. Opus 31, No. 2 Ludwig van Beethoven 

Variations on a Theme of Paganini, Opus 35 Johannes Brahms 

GENETICS COLLOQUIUM 

Dr. Nicholas W. Gillham, Department of Zoology, 
will hold the final genetics Colloquium in a series on 
Ciliate Genetics on Tuesday, April 29th, at 12:30 p.m. 
in Room 147 Nanaline H. Duke Building. 

PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Eric Simon, Ph.D., Departments of Medicine and 
Pharmacology, New York University Medical Center, 
will speak on "Opiate Receptors and Their Endoge- 
nous Ligands" for the Department of Pharmacology 
Seminar on Tuesday, April 29th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
147 of the Nanaline H. Duke Building. Dr. Leon Lack 
will be the host for this seminar which is sponsored by 
the Toxicology Training Grant. Coffee will be served 
in the lobby at 3:45 p.m. 

THE AMERICAN ASSOC. OF UNIVERSITY 
PROFESSORS SPRING MEETING 

The American Association of University Professors, 
Duke Chapter, will hold its Spring Meeting on May 1st 
at 8:15 p.m. in Zener Auditorium (130 Sociology- 
Psychology Building). The topic of the meeting is 
"THE UNIVERSITY: BUSINESS OR IVORY 
TOWER." Chancellor Kenneth Pye and Irving T. 
Diamond, James B. Duke Professor of Psychology, 
will speak on aspects of this topic and a discussion will 
follow. All members of the Duke Community are in- 
vited to attend. 

DU COUNCIL ON AGING 
AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

Mary L. C. Bernheim, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus, 
Department of Biochemistry, will speak on "Retire- 
ment From The Inside And Outside" for the Duke 
University Council On Aging And Human Develop- 
ment Seminar on Tuesday, May 6th from 4:00-5:00 
p.m. in Room 1504 of the Gerontology Building. The 
public is invited to this open seminar. 

Born in Gloucester, England, and trained at Cam- 
bridge University (BA, MA, Ph.D. in Biochemistry), 
Dr. Bernheim retired as Professor of Biochemistry at 
Duke in 1973 after forty-three years as a member of the 
faculty. She has published sixty research papers in 
professional journals. Dr. Bernheim has been active in 
the development of the Duke Institute for Learning in 
Retirement and is deeply involved in illustrating that 
learning is a lifetime affair. 






GREAT DECISIONS '80 LECTURE SERIES 

The seventh Great Decisions 80 Lecture will be 
given on Tuesday, May 6th, at 4:30 p.m. in the au- 
ditorium of the Gross Chemistry Building. Robert F. 
Conrad, Associate Professor, Economics, will speak 
on "The World Energy Crunch: America's Choices at 
Home and Abroad'" for the Duke Institute for Learn- 
ing in Retirement. 

PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR 

Rubin Bressler, M.D., Professor and Head of Inter- 
nal Medicine, Professor of Pharmacology and Chief, 
Clinical Pharmacology, University of Arizona, Tuc- 
son, Arizona, will speak on "Carnitine: Some Phar- 
macological Insights" for the Department of Phar- 
macology Seminar on Thursday, May 8th, at 4:00 p.m. 
in Room 147 of the Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee 
will be served in the lobby at 3:45 p.m. 

BIOCHEMISTRY/MEDICAL SCIENTISTS 
TRAINING PROGRAM JOINT SEMINAR 

Dr. Janice Pero, The Biological Laboratories, Har- 
vard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, will 
speak on "Positive Control of Gene Expression By 
Sigma-Like Regulatory Proteins" for the Department 
of Biochemistry and Medical Scientists Training Pro- 
gram Joint Seminar on Friday, May 9th at 12:30 p.m. 
in Room 147 of the Nanaline H. Duke Building. Coffee 
will be served at 12:15 p.m. in the lobby. 

"FIDDLER ON THE ROOF" 

Hoof n' Horn, the oldest student musical theatre 
group in the South, is proud to present the hit Broad- 
way musical "Fiddler On The Roof" on Friday, May 
9th at 8:30 p.m. in Page Auditorium. At 8:30 p.m. on 
Saturday, May 10th, there will be a special perfor- 
mance of this touching musical reserved especially for 
the family and friends of the Class of 1980. 

"Fiddler On The Roof marks the seventeenth an- 
nual Hoof n' Horn Spring production of a Broadway 
show following over thirty years of original student 
written musicals. It is one of the classical Broadway 
musicals, telling the story of Tevye, the Dairyman, and 
of his family and friends in their peasant village 
Anatevka on the eve of the Russian revolutionary 
period. Theatre-goers will remember such wonderful 
songs as "Tradition," "Matchmaker," "Sunrise, 
Sunset," and "If I Were a Rich Man." 

Tickets for the May 9th and 10th performances are 
now on sale at Page Box Office between the hours of 
9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. for $4, $5, and $6 Reserved 
Seating. Master Charge or Visa purchases are avail- 
able over the phone between the hours of 10:00 a.m. 
and 3:00 p.m. at 684-3227. 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES IN 
MAY COMMENCEMENT 

A memorandum to each candidate for a degree to be 
conferred on May 1 1 , 1980, was mailed from the Office 



of the University Marshal on March the 3rd. This 
memorandum gave directions for reserving academic 
apparel, an order of events for the Commencement 
Weekend, and information about the procuring of en- 
graved invitations and tickets. Any degree candidate 
not receiving the memorandum should consult im- 
mediately the Office of the University Marshal, 353 
Gross Chemical Laboratory, (684-6029), to be certain 
that a diploma has been ordered and that the office has 
an address for a second mailing in April. 

EAST CAMPUS DINING HALLS 
SPRING '80 CLOSINGS 

The following is the schedule for the closings for the 
spring semester of 1980 for the East Campus Dining 
Halls: 
The Gilbert-Addoms Dining Hall will close after lunch 

on Monday, May 5th. 
The Down Under will close after operations on Sun- 
day, May 4th. 
The Magnolia Room will close after lunch on Monday, 

May 5th, and the last Sunday meal will be served on 

Sunday, May 4th. 
The East Campus Union will close after breakfast on 

Monday, May 12th. 
The East Campus Catering Office will be open for 

business. 

WEST CAMPUS DINING HALLS 
END OF THE YEAR SCHEDULE 

CAMBRIDGE INN 

Closed nights after Sunday, May 4th. 

Closed days after 5:00 p.m., Monday, May 5th. 

Snack Bar will be in Blue and White Room, Tuesday. May 6th. 
UNIVERSITY ROOM 

Closed after lunch on Thursday. May 1st. 
OAK ROOM 

Closed dinner meals beginning Tuesday. May 6th. 

Open Saturday and Sunday, May 10th and 1 1th, lunch and dinner. 
(Commencement Weekend) 
SPRIG 

Closed after Friday, May 2nd. 

COMMENCEMENT SCHEDULE 

Friday. May 9th 
Dinner 

Blue and White Room Cafeteria 
Saturday, May 10th 
Breakfast 

Blue and White Room Cafeteria 
Lunch 

Blue and White Room Cafeteria 

Oak Room — a la carte 
Dinner 

Blue and White Room Cafeteria 5:30- 7:30 p.m. 

Oak Room— a special Buffet 5:30- 8:30 p.m. 

(Perfect for dinner before the Hoof n' Horn production of Fiddler 
on the Roof, Page Auditorium) 8:30 p.m. 

Sunday. May I lth 
Breakfast 

Blue and White Room Cafeteria 7:30-10:00 a.m. 

Brunch 

Gothic Dining Hall 10:00- 1:30 p.m. 

Lunch 

Blue and White Room Cafeteria 11:30- 1:30 p.m. 



5:00- 7:30 p.m. 



7:30-10:00 a.m. 



11:30- 2:30 p.m. 
11:30- 2:00 p.m. 



Oak Room 11:00- 2:00 p.m. 
Dinner 

Blue and White Room Cafeteria 5:00- 7:30 p.m. 

Oak Room— a special Champagne Buffet 5:30- 8:00 p.m. 

WEST CAMPUS DINING HALLS 
SUMMER SCHEDULE 1980 

BLUE AND WHITE ROOM CAFETERIA 

Monday through Friday, beginning Tuesday, May 6, 1980. 



7:00- 9:30 a.m. 

9:00-11:00 a.m. 
11:30- 1:45 p.m. 

5:00- 6:30 p.m. 
11:30- 1:45 p.m. 



9:00-11:00 a.m. 
11:30- 1:30 p.m. 
5:00- 6:30 p.m. 



Breakfast 

Snack Bar 

Lunch 

Dinner 
Summer Sprig open 
Sandwich Grill open for Lunch only. 

Saturday 

Breakfast and Snack Bar 

Lunch 

Dinner 

Sunday 

Breakfast 9:30-11:00 a.m. 

Lunch 11:30- 1:30 p.m. 

Dinner 5:00- 6:30 p.m. 

OAK ROOM, CAMBRIDGE INN, and UNIVERSITY ROOM 
Closed for Summer 

DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SCHEDULE 
Reading Days and Exams April 26th-May 11th. 

Perkins Library 



Saturday, 4/26 

Sunday, 4/27 

Monday, 4/28-Friday. 5/2 

Saturday, 5/3 

Sunday, 5/4 

Monday, 5/5 

Tuesday, 5/6-Friday, 5/9 

Saturday, 5/10 

Sunday, 5/1 1 

*No service after 10:45 pm. 

Undergraduate Library 

Saturday, 4/26 

Sunday, 4/27 

Monday, 4/28 



8 am-6 pm 
12:30 pm-1 am* 
8am-l am* 
8 am-6 pm 
12:30 pm-1 am* 
8am-ll pm 

8 am-5 pm 

9 am- 1 pm 
CLOSED 

stacks only open. 



Saturday. 5/3 
Sunday. 5/4 



Tuesday, 5/6-Friday, 5/9 

Saturday, 5/10 

Sunday. 5/11 

East Campus Library 

Saturday, 4/26 

Sunday, 4/27 

Monday, 4/28-Thursday, 5/ 

Friday, 5/2 

Saturday, 5/3 

Sunday, 5/4 

Monday, 5/5 

Tuesday. 5/6-Friday. 5/9 

Saturday, 5/10 

Sunday, 5/11 



8am-10:30pm 
12:30 pm-1 am 
OPEN CONTINUOUSLY 

8 am through 

Saturday, 5/3, 10:30 pm 
CLOSED from 10:30 pm through 
Sunday, 5/4, 12:30 pm 
OPEN CONTINUOUSLY 

12:30 pm through 

Monday, 5/5, 11 pm 

8 am-5 pm 
9am-l pm 
CLOSED 

9 am- 10:30 pm 
12:30 pm-midnight 
8 am-midnight 
8am-10:30pm 
9am-10:30pm 
12:30 pm-midnight 
8am-10:30pm 

8 am-5 pm 

9 am-5 pm 
CLOSED 



AMERICAN DANCE FESTIVAL TO BEAT 
INFLATION THIS SUMMER 

The American Dance Festival has provided an alter- 
native to inflation this summer with performance sub- 
scription offers of savings of up to 40% over single 



ticket prices. This summer's subscription plan reduc- 
tions vary according to attendance. Patrons planning 
to attend performances once a week will receive an 
overall savings of 25%; those who attend twice a week 
will receive a 33% reduction; and patrons purchasing 
the 3-performances-a-week plan will receive a 40% re- 
duction over single ticket prices. 

Highlighted by 8 world premieres, this summer's 
ADF performance schedule is as follows: "A Salute to 
Vaudeville Dance - ' (June 17); the Nikolais Dance 
Theatre (June 19-21); Dizzy Gillespie, along with dan- 
cers Honi Coles and Scobey Stroman and the 
Rutgers/Livingston Jazz Professors (June 23); 
Crowsnest (June 24); the Erick Hawkins Dance Com- 
pany (June 26-28); Kei Takei's Moving Earth (July 1); 
the Twyla Tharp Dance Foundation (July 3-5); and 
performances by the Paul Taylor Dance Company 
(July 7, 8, 10, 11 and 12); the Chuck Davis Dance 
Company (July 15); the Bella Lewitzky Dance Com- 
pany (July 17, 18, 19), and the Pilobolus Dance Theatre 
(July 21, 22, 24, 25 and 26). All single tickets are $8.50, 
except the Tuesday evening performances of "A Sa- 
lute to Vaudeville Dance," Crowsnest, Kei Takei's 
Moving Earth and the Chuck Davis Dance Company, 
which are $5.50. Single tickets go on sale June 2. 

For further information and information on sub- 
scription tickets call the ADF office at (919) 684-6402. 

DUKE HOMESITES— HOUSES FOR SALE 
Only those homes located on lots originally de- 
veloped and sold by the University and which are still 
owned by a member of the faculty or staff of the Uni- 
versity will be listed in the University Calendar. Call 
Fred E. Miller at extension 2054 for information re- 
garding listings. Call the appropriate number listed 
below for information regarding a particular house. 

Location: 2704 Sevier Street 

Phone:489-0680 

Number of Bedrooms: four (4) 

Number of Baths: three (3) 

Type of heating; air conditioning: Central air, gas heating 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Bruce Francis Monzyk for the Ph.D. 
degree in Chemistry was held on Thursday, April 17th. The subject 
of Mr. Monzyk's dissertation was "I. Mechanism of Ligand Sub- 
stitution of High Spin Iron (III) by Hydroxamic Acid Chelators. 
Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies on the Formation and Disso- 
ciation of a Series of Monohydroxamatoiron (III) Complexes. II. 
Kinetics and Mechanism of Aquation of the Siderophore Complex 
Ferrioxamine B. III. Catalysis of Iron (III) Removal from Ferriox- 
amine B." The committee conducting the examination consisted of 
Professors Alvin L. Crumbliss, presiding. Robert W. Henkens, C. 
William Anderson, Richard A. Palmer, and James Siedow. 



The final examination of Ms. Jane Ellen Fredericks for the Ph.D. 
degree in Chemistry was held on Tuesday, April 22nd. The subject 
of Ms. Fredericks' dissertation was "Spiro (4.5) Decane Systems by 
Photoannelation with ,,-Formyl Ketone Equivalents: The Synthesis 
of (-)— Acorenone." The committee conducting the examination 
consisted of Professors Steven W. Baldwin, presiding, Peter W. 
Jeffs, Ned A. Porter, Daniel D. Stembach. and Elmer Rauckman. 



The final examination of Ms. Melba Anne Hill for the Ph.D. de- 
gree in Economics was held on Tuesday, April 22nd. The subject of 



Ms. Hill's dissertation was "Labor Force Participation of Married 
Women in Urban Japan.'" The committee conducting the examina- 
tion consisted of Professors Gregg Lewis, presiding, T. Dudley 
Wallace, Martin Bronfenbrenner and George Tauchen. 



The final examination of Mr. Gary James Roloson for the Ph.D. 
degree in Microbiology & Immunology was held on Tuesday, April 
22nd at 10:00 a.m. in Room 264 Jones Building. The subject of Mr. 
Roloson's dissertation was "Serum Therapy of Murine Ascites 
Tumor- Adenocarcinoma 755a." The committee conducting the 
examination consisted of Professors Dani P. Bolognesi, presiding, 
Ralph E. Smith, Dennis B. Amos. Ralph A. Snyderman, and Jac- 
queline Reynolds. 

The final examination of Mr. Kuo-Jang Kao for the Ph.D. degree 
in Pathology was held on Thursday, April 24th at 2:00 p.m. in Room 
223 Sands Building. The subject of Mr. Kao's dissertation was 
"Factor VII; VON Willebrand Factor Receptor on Human Platelet." 
The committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors 
Salvatore Pizzo, presiding, Darell D. Bigner, Dolph Adams, Robert 
Lefkowitz, and Herbert A. Cooper. 



The final examination of Mr. Michael Craig King for the Ph.D. 
degree in Psychology was held on Thursday, April 24th at 1:00 p.m. 
in Room 222 Sociology/Psychology Building. The subject of Mr. 
King's dissertation was "Sequential Effects in the Variability of 
Magnitude Estimations of Loudness." The committee conducting 
the examination consisted of Professors Gregory R. Lockhead, 
presiding, William Bevan, Herbert Crovitz, David Rubin, J.E.R. 
Staddon. and Naomi Quinn. 



The final examination of Mr. James Michael Johnson for the 
Ph.D. degree in History was held on Friday, April 25th at 3:00 p.m. 
in Room 235 Allen Building. The subject of Mr. Johnson's disserta- 
tion was " Not a Single Soldier in the Province': The Military Es- 
tablishment of Georgia and the Coming of the American Revolu- 
tion." The committee conducting the examination consisted of Pro- 
fessors I. B. Holley, Jr., presiding. Robert F. Durden, Peter H. 
Wood, and High M.Hall. 



The final examination of Mr. Norman Clark Strole for the Ph.D. 
degree in Electrical Engineering was held on Friday, April 25th at 
4:00 p.m. in Room 112 Electrical Engineering Bldg. The subject of 
Mr. Strole's dissertation was "A Simulation Facility for Perfor- 
mance Evaluation of Shared-Resource Computer Architecture." 
The committee conducting the examination consisted of Professors 
Peter N. Marinos. presiding, Roger C. Barr, Rhett T. George. Harry 
A. Owen, and Kishor S. Trivedi. 

The final examination of Mr. Joseph A. Travis for the Ph.D. de- 
gree in Zoology was held on Friday. April 25th at 1:00 p.m. in Room 
225 Biological Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. Travis' disser- 
tation was "The Ecological Genetics of Larval Development in 
Hylid Frogs." The committee conducting the examination consisted 
of Professors Henry M. Wilbur, presiding, Joseph R. Bailey, Vance 
A. Tucker, Janis Antonovics, Donald Burdick, and Nelson G. 
Hairston. 



The final examination of Mr. Ernest Jeffrey Holder, Jr. for the 
Ph.D. degree in Mathematics will be held on Monday, April 28th at 
3:00 p.m. in Room 138 Physics Building. The subject of Mr. Hold- 
er's dissertation is "On the Existence, Scattering, Blow Up. and 
Decay of Solutions to Systems of Nonlinear Schrodinger Equa- 
tions." The committee to conduct the examination consists of Pro- 
fessors Michael Reed, presiding, William Allard, Robert J. V. 
Jackson. David Schaeffer, and Seth Warner. 



The final examination of Mr. Steven Garry Smith for the Ph.D. 
degree in Religion will be held on Tuesday, April 29th at 2:00 p.m. in 
Room 210 Old Divinity Building. The subject of Mr. Smith's disser- 
tation is "Totaliter Aliter: The Argument to the Other in the thought 
of Karl Barth and Emmanual Levinas." The committee to conduct 
the examination consists of Professors William H. Poteat, presiding. 
Waldo Beach, Robert E. Cushman, Frederick Herzog, and Richard 
A. Smyth. 



The final examination of Ms. Leslie Susan Reinherz for the Ph.D. 
degree in Zoology will be held on Wednesday. April 30th at 9:00 
a.m. in Room 225 Biological Sciences Building. The subject of Ms. 
Reinherz's dissertation is "The Effects of Varying Social Relation- 
ships on Communication in the Australian Zebra Finch." The com- 
mittee to conduct the examination consists of Professors Peter H. 
Klopfer. presiding. Donald J. Fluke, John E. R. Staddon, Carl 
Erickson, and R. Haven Wiley. 



The final examination of Ms. Joanne Margaret Werts for the Ph.D. 
degree in Zoology will be held on Wednesday, April 30th at 1:00 
p.m. in Room 225 Biological Sciences Building. The subject of Ms. 
Werts' dissertation is "'Sexual Preferences Based on Dominance 
Status in Ring Doves {Streptopelia Risoria)." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors Peter H. Klopfer, 
presiding, Joseph R. Bailey, John E. R. Staddon, Carl Erickson, and 
Donald S. Burdick. 

ARTSFARE *80 
DUKE UNIVERSITY FESTIVAL OF ARTS 

In the near future a brochure, Artsfare '80, the Duke 
University Festival of Arts, will be mailed to the home 
addresses of all members of the faculty, staff, emeriti 
and Duke Calendar subscribers. Copies may also be 
secured from the Office of Cultural Affairs, the Sum- 
mer Session Office and the Flowers Information Desk. 

Detailed information will be carried in this publica- 
tion of the full schedule of artistic presentations to take 
place on the campus during the two summer sessions. 
It will give ticket availability and prices as well as pro- 
gram selections. 

Artsfare '80 is a full menu of exciting and tasty of- 
ferings in the arts — drama, dance, music, opera, films, 
lectures, crafts, museum showings, continuing educa- 
tion programs, organ and carillon recitals. Many per- 
formances will be open to the public without charge. 
The public is cordially invited to join the University 
Community in attending all of these artistic functions. 
For information and/or ticket information please call 
684-4059 or 684-3227. 

ARTS IN THE CHURCH MAY 19-23, 1980 

A five day workshop entitled "The Use of the Per- 
forming Arts in the Program of the Local Church and 
Campus Ministries" is scheduled to take place on the 
Duke Campus May 19-23, 1980. Registrations, open to 
all, are now being accepted through the Office of Cul- 
tural Affairs (684-5578) or the Divinity School Office of 
Continuing Education (684-3041). The workshop is de- 
signed to help religious leaders and lay workers learn 
more effective and creative uses of dance, music and 
drama in the actual programming needs of the local 
church and campus ministry. 



COMING EVENTS 
"BE JUBILANT MY FEET" 

On Monday, May 19th, Artsfare '80 will present 
"Be Jubilant My Feet" at 8:15 p.m. in Page Au- 
ditorium. Tickets, priced at $5, $4, and $3, are now 
available at Page Box Office. A $1 discount will be 
given all students and 65+ persons. Group discounts 
may also be obtained by calling 684-4059. 



"Be Jubilant My Feet," written and narrated by the 
distinguished dance authority and critic Walter Terry, 
will feature dancers Pamela Critelli and David Ander- 
son of David Anderson Dance Company. It is a cele- 
bration of dance as religious expression, tracing the 
relationship of dance from primitive times to the pre- 
sent. The dances range from ancient nature worship 
through the evolution of symbolic gesture and cere- 
monial dances to dances as experience in religious 
ecstasy and finally as an exposition of religious tenets 
and experiences. 

FRANCIS PERRY IN RECITAL 
FOR LUTE AND GUITAR 

Artsfare '80 will present Francis Perry in a recital of 
music for guitar and lute on Wednesday, May 21st, at 



8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Tickets, priced at $3 for 
the general public and $2 for students and those 65 and 
over, will be available at Page Box Office by May 1st. 
Mr. Perry returns to Duke for his fourth residency and 
will be available for classes during both Summer Ses- 
sions. 

SEASON TICKET INFORMATION 

Season tickets for the Duke Opera Festival, Summer 
Theatre at Duke, and N. C. Chamber Players will be 
available at Page Box Office beginning the 12th of 
May. Season tickets may now be purchased for the 
American Dance Festival. Call 684-6402 for brochure 
and information. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR ^USPS 162-120) 

Published by Duke University 

Box KM Duke Station 
Durham, North Carolina 27706 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE 
PAID AT DURHAM, N. C. 



Duke University 

calendar/ 




May 15- June 29, 1980 



Volume 79 



Published May 13, 1980 



Number 29 



SUMMER SESSION I CALENDAR 



Thursday, May 15 

TERM I CLASSES BEGIN. 

Through May 30th DUU Galleries Art Exhibit: Ruth Pinnell. West 
Campus Gallery. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

5:00-7:00 p.m. The Office of Summer Educational Programs An- 
nounces: AN OPENING PICNIC AND MUSICAL. Main 
Residential Quad, West Campus. 

7:30 & 9:50 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: (DOUBLE FEATURE) 
•DOG DAY AFTERNOON" (R) ("75 color) dir. by Sidney 
Lumet: stars Al Pacino. John Cazale. Al Pacino shows his 
tremendous versatility in this collage of humor, pathos, fright 
and chaos. Pacino is Sonny, confused and frantic about his 
tattered life, an unhappy wife, debts and a male lover desper- 
ate for a sex-change operation. 9:50 p.m. "WAIT UNTIL 
DARK" ('68 color) (PG) dir. by Terrence Young: stars Au- 
drey Hepburn. Alan Arkin, Richard Crenna. Adapted from 
the New York stage play and voted one of the ten best by 
Film Daily's critics. Wait Until Dark is a suspenseful movie 
of an innocent couple who become involved with a narcotics 
gang. Gross Chem. $1. 

Friday, May 16 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 
011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 

Saturday, May 17 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
Sunday, May 18 

10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Juanita Bass Wright, Assistant 
Minister to the University. The Service of Worship is Broad- 
cast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

Monday, May 19 

May 19-23 ARTS IN THE CHURCH CONFERENCE. "The Use of 
the Performing Arts in the Program of the Local Church and 
Campus Ministries." Divinity School. Sponsored by: The 
Divinity School; Duke University Chapel; Office of Cultural 
Affairs/ Artsfare '80; Duke Summer Festival of Arts; Summer 
Educational Programs. 
12:30 p.m. Special Biochemistry Seminar. Speaker: Dr. Stefan 
Marklund. Rm. 127 Nanaline H. Duke Bldg. 

3:30 p.m. University Review Committee Meeting. Board Rm. 
Allen Bldg. 

4:00 p.m. Drop/Add for Term I ends. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

8:15 p.m. ARTSFARE '80: "BE JUBILANT MY FEET" Narra- 
tion, Walter Terry, Dance Authority, featuring dancers 
Pamela Critelli and David Anderson of David Anderson 
Dance Company. Page Aud. Tickets (Reserved Seating) $5, 
$4, $3 Gen. Public; $1 off, Students $65±. Group Rates 
Available. 
Tuesday, May 20 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

7:15 p.m. ARTSFARE '80: CARILLON RECITAL BY 



J. SAMUEL HAMMOND. Duke Chapel. Free to the Public. 

8:15 p.m. ARTSFARE '80: ORGAN RECITAL BY ROBERT 

PARKINS. Duke Chapel. Free to the public. 
Wednesday, May 21 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

6:30 p.m. D. U. Chapel Summer Choir Organizational Rehearsal. 
Chapel. 

7:30 & 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: (DOUBLE FEATURE). 
"STAGECOACH" (G) C39) dir. by John Ford; stars John 
Wayne, Thomas Mitchell. Claire Trevor. Stagecoach is 
brimming with colorful characters that have become stan- 
dards in the genre, such as the noble prostitute (Claire Tre- 
vor), the gallant Southern gambler (John Carradine). and the 
tippling doctor (Thomas Mitchell). Academy Award Winner. 
"THE SEARCHERS" (G) ('56 color) dir. by John Ford; 
stars John Wayne, Vera Miles. Natalie Wood. Gross Chem. 
$1.50. 

7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services Program: THE BARBARA 
SINGER TRIO, Jazz and Swing. Main Lobby Hosp. Free. 

8:15 p.m. ARTSFARE '80: FRANCIS PERRY, ARTIST-IN- 
RESIDENCE IN A RECITAL OF MUSIC FOR GUITAR 
AND LUTE. Page Aud. Tickets (Gen. Admission) $3 Gen. 
Public; $2 Students and 65 ±. 
Thursday, May 22 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

4:00 p.m. Wellcome Lecture in the Basic Sciences. Speaker: J. Z. 
Young. Rm. 143 Jones Bldg.. DUMC. 

Friday, May 23 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 
Oil (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 

Saturday, May 24 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
Sunday, May 25 

10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Robert T. Young, Minister to the 
University. The Service of Worship is Broadcast over 
WDBS, 107.1 FM. 
2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

Monday, May 26 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

8:00 p.m. Freewater Films: "LOLITA" (PG) James Mason, Sue 
Lyon, Shelley Winters, Peter Sellers. Stanley Kubrick's bril- 
liant adaptation of Nobokov's controversial novel. Cannily 
shifting from social satire to tragic farce, this is a masterpiece 
of comic despair. B/W. Bio. Sci. $1.50. 

Tuesday, May 27 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
Wednesday, May 28 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

7:30 & 9:40 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: (DOUBLE FEATURE) 
"CITIZEN KANE" (G) (41) dir. by Orson Welles; Stars 
Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Agnes Moorhead. Citizen 
Kane is acclaimed as the best American film ever made. It is 



extraordinarily entertaining and an incredible cinematic 
achievement, telling the story of newspaper tycoon Charles 
Foster Kane. 9:40 p.m. "IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT" 
(G) C34) dir. by Frank Capra; stars Clark Gable, Claudette 
Colbert. Winner of five major Academy Awards, this won- 
derfully warm, funny and moving comedy is a story of a 
fugitive heiress and a rebellious reporter who tames her. 
Gross Chem. $1.50. 
7:30 p.m. DUMC Cultural Services Program: 'FREE TO BE 
YOU AND ME" The Bragtown Childrens' Theatre, Court- 
yard Dining Rm„ Hosp. Free. 

Thursday, May 29 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
Friday, May 30 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 
011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 

8:30 p.m. SUMMER THEATER AT DUKE's Opening Night 
Champagne Gala Benefit for University Center Theatre 
Building Fund. A champagne reception for cast, crew and 
audience follows "Child's Play" by Robert Marasco in the 
E. D. Music Room. 8:30 p.m. Season: $13.50 Orchestra; $10 
Balcony. Singles: $4 Orchestra; $3 Balcony. Plus a tax de- 
ductible contribution of $5 or more per ticket for Opening 
Night. 
Saturday, May 31 
10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

8:00 p.m. National Opera Co. & the Department of Music presents 
the DUKE OPERA FESTIVAL: "MARRIAGE OF FIG- 
ARO" by Mozart. Page Aud. Tickets: (Reserved Seating) 
Gen. Public: $15 Season; $6 Singles. Students with ID & 
Children: $10 Season. $4 Singles. 

8:30 p.m. SUMMER THEATRE AT DUKE presents "CHILD'S 
PLAY." E. D. Music Room. Season: $13.50 Orchestra; $10 
Balcony. Singles: $4 Orchestra; $3 Balcony. 
Sunday, June 1 

10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Dennis M. Campbell, Director 
of Continuing Education, Duke Divinity School. The Service 
of Worship is Broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

8:30 p.m. SUMMER THEATRE AT DUKE presents "CHILD'S 
PLAY." E. D. Music Room. Season: $13.50 Orchestra; $10 
Balcony. Singles: $4 Orchestra: $3 Balcony. 
Monday, June 2 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

8:00 p.m. Freewater Films: "DELIVERANCE" (R) ('72) dir. 
John Boorman; stars Jon Voight and Burt Reynolds. Bio. Sci. 
$1.50. 
Tuesday, June 3 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
Wednesday, June 4 

10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. THE RITES OF SPRING. On the lawn out- 
side the Davison Bldg. 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

7:30 & 9:20 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: (DOUBLE FEATURE) 
"SINGIN" IN THE RAIN" (G) ("52 color) dir. by Gene Kelly 
and Stanley Donen; stars Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor. 
Jean Hagen. Debbie Reynolds. The screen's most exhilarat- 
ing musical, Singin' In The Rain spoofs the glorious days of 
early Hollywood, when the advent of "talkies" made new 
careers and demolished a few old ones. 9:20 p.m. "BYE BYE 
BIRDIE" (PG) ("63 color) dir. by George Sidney; stars Janet 
Leigh. Dick Van Dyke, Ann-Margaret, Paul Lynde. A happy, 
zestful film which pokes gentle fun at the younger 
generation — from their soda shop meetings to their intermi- 
nable telephoning, from their careless clothing to their over- 
powering romances — has been fashioned from the Broadway 
musical play. Bio. Sci. $1.50. 
Thursday, June 5 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 



8:30 p.m. SUMMER THEATRE AT DUKE presents "CHILD'S 
PLAY." E. D. Music Room. Season: $13.50 Orchestra; $10 
Balcony. Thurs. Evening Tickets: $2.50. 

Friday, June 6 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

1:00 p.m. Islamic Assoc, at D. U.: Prayers (Salat Al Jumaa). Rm. 
011 (PCR) Baldwin Aud. Basement. 

8:30 p.m. SUMMER THEATRE AT DUKE presents "CHILD'S 
PLAY." E. D. Music Room. Season: $13.50 Orchestra; $10 
Balcony. Singles: $4 Orchestra; $3 Balcony. 

Saturday, June 7 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

8:00 p.m. National Opera Co. & the Department of Music presents 
the DUKE OPERA FESTIVAL: "SIGNOR DELUSO" by 
Pasatieri and "GIANNI SCHICCHI" by Puccini. Page Aud. 
Season Tickets or Singles: $6 Gen. Public, $4 Students with 
ID & Children. (Reserved Seating). 

8:30 p.m. SUMMER THEATRE AT DUKE presents "CHILD'S 
PLAY." E. D. Music Room. Season: $13.50 Orchestra. $10 
Balcony. Singles: $4 Orchestra: $3 Balcony. 

Sunday, June 8 

10:55 a.m. University Service of Worship University Chapel. 
Preacher: The Reverend Peter J. Lee. Rector, Chapel of the 
Cross Episcopal Church. Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The 
Service of Worship is Broadcast over WDBS, 107.1 FM. 

2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

3:00 p.m. Museum of Art Guided Tour. 

5:30 p.m. N. C. Chamber Players Pops Garden Concert: 
JOHANN STRAUSS FESTIVAL. Sarah P. Duke Memorial 
Gardens. Free to the Public. 

8:30 p.m. SUMMER THEATRE AT DUKE presents "CHILD'S 
PLAY." E. D. Music Room. Season: $13.50 Orchestra; $10 
Balcony. Singles: $4 Orchestra; $3 Balcony. 

Monday, June 9 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

8:15 p.m. N. C. Chamber Players Recital Series: BAROQUE 
CONCERT. Gross Chem. Aud. Season Tickets $15; Single 
Tickets: $5; $4 with Duke ID. 
Tuesday, June 10 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 
Wednesday, June 1 1 

9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Museum of Art Open Hours. 

7:30 & 9:20 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures: (DOUBLE FEATURE) 
"STRANGERS ON A TRAIN" (PG) ("51) dir. by Alfred 
Hitchcock; stars Robert Walker, Farley Granger. Alfred 
Hitchcock, the master of suspense, shows his flair for staging 
in this classic thriller. Walker strikes up a conversation with 
Granger who reveals his desire for a divorce which his wife 
refuses to grant. Walker suggests that he will kill Granger's 
wife if Granger kills Walker's hated father. 9.20 p.m. 
"NORTH BY NORTHWEST" ('59 color) dir. by Alfred 
Hitchcoc